The enduring popularity of THE RIFLEMAN 55 years after its five-year run (1958–1963) is its character-driven narratives.  Many of the most talented actors working in the entertainment industry visited North Fork over the series' 168 episodes.  More than 500 actors made guest appearances in over 970 credited roles.

Guest appearances were made by venerable veteran actors, including John Carradine, Lon Chaney, Jr., Ellen Corby, John Dehner and Agnes Moorehead.  Talented newcomers also made appearances on THE RIFLEMAN series, including Mark Goddard, Dennis Hopper, Michael Landon, Harry Dean Stanton, Robert Vaughn, and many others.

A long call sheet of the most recognizable, top actors working in the 1950s and 1960s also guest starred on THE RIFLEMAN, including Julie Adams, Richard Anderson, Michael Ansara, James Coburn, Leif Erickson, James Franciscus, Martin Landau, Warren Oates, Lee Van Cleef, and scores of others.  A few celebrated icons renowned for their accomplishments in other fields also made cameo appearances on THE RIFLEMAN series, including singer Sammy Davis, Jr., baseball legend Don Drysdale, comedian Buddy Hackett and writer/director/producer Paul Mazursky.

Directory of Guest Stars

 
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John Abbott

John Abbott, born John Kefford, was an English character actor.  He appeared in 150 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  He performed in a wide range of different genres, although several of his early roles were uncredited.  Despite being blacklisted in the 1950s, Abbott remained a sought-after performer.  He is best remembered for his portrayal of Frederick Fairlie in "The Woman in White" (1948).  He also provided the voice of the wolf in Walt Disney's "The Jungle Book" (1967).  Abbott made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dr. Hennekin in "The Vision" (episode 66).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he also guest-starred in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Julie Adams

Julie Adams, born Betty May Adams, is an American television and film actress.  She has appeared in nearly 150 movies and TV shows in a career spanning more than 50 years.  Born in Arkansas, she later moved to California to pursue a career in acting.  Most of her early appearances were in B-movie westerns.  She is perhaps best known for her portrayal of Kay Lawrence in the classic science-fiction film "Creature from the Black Lagoon" (1954).  She also made several appearances as Eve Simpson in the mystery series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).  Adams made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the title character in "Nora" (episode 75).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Adams also guest-starred in "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Stanley Adams

Stanley Adams was an American actor and screenwriter.  He appeared in nearly 200 television shows and movies in a career spanning more than 20 years.  He wrote for various popular television series, including "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Star Trek" (1966–1969).  He had his first film role in "Death of a Salesman" (1951), portraying the bartender.  He had a recurring role in the comedy series "The Adventures of Hiram Holliday" (1956–1957), playing the part of Garreaux.  Adams made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dr. Jay Carter in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Adams also guest-starred in "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Claude Akins

Claude Akins was an American actor of stage, film and television.  He appeared in over 100 movies and 180 television shows in a career spanning more than 40 years.  He served in the US Army Signal Corps during World War II and was stationed in Burma and the Philippines.  Prior to his military service, Akins attended Northwestern University where he studied theater and upon returning home from his last deployment, he rekindled his interest in art and drama, appearing in his first film role in "From Here to Eternity" (1953).  Akins was broad-shouldered and barrel-chested, with a deep baritone voice and dark wavy hair.  Gregarious, likeable and friendly, he was never short of work.  He was equally adept at playing sneering cowardly villains and portraying hard-nosed cops.  Akins is best remembered for his television role as Sheriff Lobo in the 1970's series "B.J. and the Bear" and later a spin-off series, "The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo."

He quickly began notching up roles in TV shows, including "Dragnet," "My Friend Flicka" and "Zane Grey Theatre."  He also turned in several strong cinematic performances, playing Mack in the excellent "The Defiant Ones" (1958), gunfighter Joe Burdette in the landmark western "Rio Bravo" (1959), Sgt. Kolwicz in "Merrill's Marauders" (1962) and Earl Sylvester in the gripping "The Killers" (1964).  In the early 1970's Akins appeared in several supernatural TV films, playing "no-nonsense" sheriffs in both "The Night Stalker" and "The Norliss Tapes."  He was virtually unrecognizable underneath his simian make-up as war-mongering General Aldo in "Battle for the Planet of the Apes" (1973).  Akins continued staring in films and television until the time of his death from cancer in 1994.

Akins appeared in many classic western series, including "The Big Valley," "Gunsmoke," "The Virginian" and "Rawhide."  He also appeared in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Floyd Doniger in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8), Tom Benton in "Meeting at Midnight" (episode 74) and Bletch Droshek in "Strange Town" (episode 81).

Chris Alcaide

Chris Alcaide made ten appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He is best known for his roles in westerns, having appeared in over 400 television western programs.  Alcaide, a veteran character actor of great range and talent appeared in a wide variety of projects, including "The Glass Menagerie," "The Wild One" with Marlon Brando, "Assassination" with Charles Bronson and "Kid Galahad" with Elvis Presley.  Other movie credits include "The Miami Story," "Gunslinger," "Miami Expose," "The 49th Man," "Massacre Canyon" and "Rock All Night."

Norman Alden

Norman Alden is an American character actor.  He has appeared in more than 200 television shows and movies in a career spanning 50 years.  Following his service in World War II, Alden attended Texas Christian University (TCU), where he began developing his skills as an actor.  He made several appearances in the comedy series "Hennesey" (1959–1962), which starred Jackie Cooper, Abby Dalton and Henry Kulky.  In addition to being a guest star, Alden also had a recurring role in the comedic western "Rango" (1967), playing the part of Captain Horton.  Alden made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Duff in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154).  Alden guest-starred in other westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), and he had a recurring role in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), in which he portrayed Johnny Ringo.

Virginia Aldridge

Virginia Aldridge appeared as the Waitress in THE RIFLEMAN pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter."   She also appeared in several other western series and films of the 1950s and 60s.

Richard Alexander

Richard Alexander was an American actor who worked in film and television for nearly 50 years.  Most of his roles were uncredited, but he appeared in numerous films, including "All Quiet on the Western Front" (1930), "Flash Gordon" (1936, 1938), "Zorro Rides Again" (1937) and "Requiem for a Gunfighter" (1965).  He also made numerous television appearances, frequently in Westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1950–1953), "The Gene Autry Show" (1950), "Dick Tracy (1950), "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952), "Death Valley Days" (1952) and his final role in "Petrocelli" (1971).

Alexander appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN and was one of seven actors to play Nels/Nils Swenson/Swensen/Svenson, usually also listed in the credits as the Blacksmith.  He appeared in "The Deserter" (episode 65), "Smoke Screen" (episode 68), "Meeting at Midnight" (episode 74) and "The Martinet" (episode 83).

Mel Allen

Mel Allen, born Melvin F. Allen, was an American actor.  He appeared in more than 20 movies and television shows during a 25-year career.  His first film appearance was an uncredited role in "The Return of Dracula" (1958).  Allen made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the part of Sweeney in "Miss Bertie" (episode 90).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he also guest-starred in "The Big Valley" (1965–1969).

Henry Allin

Henry Allin was an American actor.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tom Burroughs in "The Assailants" (episode 149).  In addition to the RIFLEMAN, Allin also guest-starred in an unsold pilot, "Call to Danger" (1968).  A second pilot with the same title was made in 1973, starring Peter Graves.  The second pilot also went unsold, but it won Graves the leading role in "Mission Impossible" (1966–1973).

Jean Allison

Jean Allison is an American actress who has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 20 years.  Appearing mostly in the western genre, Allison also made guest appearances in various popular television series, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a woman in "Flowers By the Door" (episode 92).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Allison also guest-starred in "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961).

John Alvin

John Alvin, born John Alvin Hoffstadt, was an American film, stage and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 150 movies and television shows during a 50-year career.  Alvin demonstrated an interest in acting beginning in high school.  He eventually made his way to California to study acting at the Pasadena Playhouse.  Despite having formal training, many of Alvin's roles were uncredited.  "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957) proved to be a breakthrough for Alvin, who made five guest appearances in the western series.  Following "The Lone Ranger," Alvin went on to act in other popular series, including "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Applegate in "Skull" (episode 124).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Alvin also guest-starred in "The Texan" (1958–1960) and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963).

Henry Amargo

Henry Amargo, born Enrique Amargo, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 11 movies and television shows during a one-decade career as an actor.  Several of his roles were uncredited.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Juan in "Baranca" (episode 82).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Amargo also guest-starred in "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

Ed Ames

Ed Ames, born Edmund Dantes Urick, is an American singer and actor.  He has 16 credits as an actor in a career spanning more than 30 years.  Despite a modest upbringing, Ames was educated in classical music, as well as opera.  He is known for performing in a group called The Ames Brothers, a popular 1950s singing group.  As a solo artist, Ames had four top-twenty singles on the national charts.  In his television career, Ames is perhaps best-remembered for his recurring role as Mingo in the western series "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).  Ames made his first television appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lee Coyle in "Quiet Night, Deadly Night" (episode 146).

Amanda Ames (Wallace Earl Sparks Laven)

Born Amanda Foulger, Wallace Earl Sparks was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in nearly 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost four decades.  Her filmography lists credits under various stage names, including Eileen Harley and Amanda Ames.  According to Laven's daughter Barbara, she took the stage name Eileen from a childhood friend and put it together with Harley, which was a family name.  She borrowed the stage name Amanda from another friend who was a professional dancer and with whom she appeared in several musicals.  According to her daughter, Laven thought Amanda sounded well with Ames.  She was married to Arnold Laven, late co-founder of Levy-Gardner-Laven Productions and creator, producer and director of THE RIFLEMAN.  They sometimes worked together.  Harley guest-starred in many popular television shows, especially crime dramas, including "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), which starred Chuck Connors, Ben Gazarra and Roger Perry; "Ironside" (1967–1975), starring Raymond Burr; "Police Woman" (1974–1978), starring Angie Dickenson and Earl Holliman; "The Rockford Files" (1974–1980), starring James Garner; and "Hardcastle and McCormick" (1983–1986), starring Brian Keith; as well as the family comedy "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and the medical dramas "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), starring Richard Chamberlain, and "Marcus Welby, M.D." (1969–1976), starring Robert Young and James Brolin.

Wallace Earl appeared in several films, playing an uncredited part in the dramatic comedy "Blue Astaire" (1946), starring Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby; Sally in the sci-fi film "The Monster That Challenged the World" (1957), directed by Arnold Laven; an uncredited role in the biographical action film "Geronimo" (1962), starring Chuck Connors and directed by Arnold Laven; and Ellie in the musical comedy "Clambake" (1967), starring Elvis Presley.

Wallace Earl made five appearances (under several different stage names) in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clair Wheatley Carney in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17), Myrtle in "The Hangman" (episode 76) and "The Silent Knife" (episode 89), Mrs. Lovering in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103), and Ruth in "The Executioner" (episode 142).  She also guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1960s and 70s, including "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.  Wallace Earl Laven passed away February 27, 2012 after a long illness.

Robert Anacher

Robert Anacher made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the part of the infant, Fancy, in "The Baby Sitter" (episode 52).

Luana Anders

Luana Anders, born Luana Margo Anderson, was an American television and film actress.  Over a 40-year acting career, Anders had more than 30 film and over 300 television credits.  She got her start in low-budget B-movies, appearing in mostly forgettable pictures, but a few iconic ones in the genre, including Roger Corman's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1961) and Francis Ford Coppola's "Dementia 13" (1962).  A contemporary of Jack Nicholson, she co-starred with him in several pictures including "Easy Rider" (1969), "The Last Detail" (1973), "Missouri Breaks" (1976) and "Goin' South" (1978).  Nicholson later acknowledged her in his Academy Award acceptance speech for Best Actor in "As Good as it Gets" (1997).  Anders also appeared in the "Chinatown" sequel, "The Two Jakes" (1990).   Anders made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lisabeth Bishop in "Shivaree" (episode 19).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, she also made appearances in "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Lawman" (1958–1962) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Richard Anderson

Richard Anderson is an American actor whose career in film and television spanned more than fifty years.  He first became interested in acting at an early age, appearing in high school plays, and after serving in the Army, he began doing summer stock, radio work and playing bit parts in movies.  He performed comedy scenes modeled on a "screen test" format for a TV series called "Lights, Camera, Action" (1950).  Shortly thereafter, MGM offered him a contract.  Anderson went on to have a prolific television career with roles in genres ranging from detective dramas to westerns, including a recurring role in the last season of "Perry Mason" (1964–1966), playing police Lt. Steve Drumm, and also "Zorro," "Death Valley Days," "I Spy," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," "The Fugitive," "The Big Valley," and many others.  In the 1970's he appeared in "Gunsmoke," "Ironside," and "The Love Boat," and in the 1980's he guest starred on "Charlie's Angels" and on "Dynasty."  Anderson is best known for his role as Oscar Goldman, boss to Lee Majors' "Six Million Dollar Man" and Lindsay Wagner's "Bionic Woman."

Richard Anderson made six guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing a different role in each episode.  He played Tom Birch in "One Went To Denver " (episode 25), the title role of Lariat Jones in "Lariat" (episode 67), Duke Jennings in "Miss Bertie" (episode 90), Jason Gowdy in " Flowers By the Door " (episode 92), Harry Chase in "Milly's Brother" (episode 140), and Griff in "The Bullet" (episode 163).

John Anderson

John Anderson was an American actor who had a prolific career in both film and television spanning four decades.  He appeared in over 500 roles in film and television, frequently appearing in recurring roles, including in "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  Anderson is perhaps best remembered for his television role as Harry Jackson, MacGyver's grandfather, in the popular Richard Dean Anderson series.  Anderson portrayed President Abraham Lincoln twice, in "The Lincoln Conspiracy" (1977) and in the series "The Voyagers!" (1980), and he portrayed President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1979 mini-series "Backstairs at the White House."  Among his many film roles, he appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 classic horror film, "Psycho," Sam Peckinpah's 1962 iconic western, "Ride the High Country," John Sturges's 1965 western spoof, "The Hallelujah Trail," and John Sayles' 1988 chronicles of baseball's 1919 World Series scandal, "Eight Men Out."  Anderson also co-starred with Chuck Connors in the 1962 film, "Geronimo."

Anderson made eleven guest appearances in all five seasons of THE RIFLEMAN, playing a different character in each episode.  He portrayed Owny in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17), Chet Packard in "Shivaree" (episode 19), Eli Flack in "The Hawk" (episode 29), Sully Hobbs in "The Patsy" (episode 41) , Cass Callicott in "Day of the Hunter" (episode 55), Jess in "Mail Order Groom" (episode 56), John Beaumont in "Shotgun Man" (episode 69), Hank Clay in "Face of Yesterday" (episode 95), Will Temple in "The Journey Back" (episode 115), John Gangling in "Incident At Line Shack Six" (episode 156), and Sam Gibbs in "Old Man Running" (episode 166).

James Anderson

James Anderson, sometimes billed as Kyle James, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 100 television shows and movies during his 30-year career, although virtually all of his early roles were uncredited.  He was typecast as the brutish villain and is best-remembered for his portrayal of Bob Ewell in "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962).  Anderson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the role of Marshal Dixon in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  He also guest-starred in "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Keith Andes

Keith Andes, born John Charles Andes, was an American television, film, radio and stage actor.  He garnered nearly 70 credits as an actor during his nearly 40-year career.  He began developing his acting skills in childhood, making his first radio appearance at the age of 12.  He was an active performer throughout his high school years and later.  Andes was well-educated, first attending Oxford University, then graduating with a bachelor's degree in education from Temple University, Philadelphia, in 1943.  He also studied voice at the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music.  During his service in the Air Force, in World War II, Andes embarked on a career on Broadway.  He was the leading man in the crime drama, "This Man Dawson" (1959).  He also had a recurring role as Keith Granville in the comedy series "Glynis" (1963), starring the famous stage performer Glynis Johns.  Andes made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Reynolds in "The Debt" (episode 133).  He also guest-starred in "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Morris Ankrum

Morris Ankrum, born Morris Nussbaum, was a character actor in American radio, television and film.  He appeared in more than 250 roles during a career spanning 30 years.  Although he began his career in academia, Ankrum eventually made his way into acting via the drama department at the University of California, Berkeley.  He taught drama and acting at the Pasadena Playhouse prior to signing with Paramount Pictures in the 1930s.  He is best-remembered for his work in the western and science-fiction genres.  He is also recognized for his recurring role as the Judge in the television crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Ankrum made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Aaron Pelser in "Shivaree" (episode 19) and Jacob Black in "The Actress" (episode 94).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Ankrum appeared in the TV westerns, "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Lawman" (1958–1962) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Michael Ansara

Michael Ansara was an American stage, television, film and voice actor, as well as a director and producer.  Born in Syria, Ansara immigrated to the United States at the age of two.  Originally, he dreamed of becoming a physician, but kindled a passion for performing after taking some acting classes to overcome his natural shyness.  He has appeared in nearly 200 films and television shows in a career spanning more than five decades.  He appeared in several Bible-era epics, including portraying Judas in "The Robe" (1953), starring Victor Mature, Prince Belshazzar in "Slaves of Babylon" (1953), the taskmaster in "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring Charleton Heston and Yul Brynner, Herod's commander in "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965), starring an ensemble cast that included Max von Sydow and Charleton Heston.  In 1999, Ansara had the starring role in the dramatic film "The Long Road Home."  Despite his Middle Eastern heritage, Ansara was often cast as a Native American in his early career.  He is best known for his role as Cochise in the television series "Broken Arrow" (1956–1958), which made him a household name.  A later generation would recognize him for his portrayal of Commander Kang in three installments of the sci-fi franchise "Star Trek."  While working on "Broken Arrow" Ansara met Barbara Eden, whom he later married.  He appeared in two episodes of Eden's hit comedy show "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), co-starring Larry Hagman.

Ansara appeared in many of the most popular TV shows of the 1950s through 80s, guest-starring in every genre from crime dramas, whodunits, sci-fi, comedy and action adventures to westerns. He appeared in THE RIFLEMAN twice, on both occasions playing Deputy U.S. Marshal Sam Buckhart in "The Indian" (episode 21) and "The Raid" (episode 37).  The storyline had Buckhart coming to North Fork in search of Indians suspected of murdering a Texas Ranger and his family. THE RIFLEMAN episodes were spun-off for a new NBC series, "Law of the Plainsman" (1959–1960) starring Ansara as Buckhart and co-starring Gina Gillespie and Robert Harland.  The series is regarded by some as one of the best television westerns ever made.  Although better know for his role in "Broken Arrow," Ansara also thought that "Plainsman" was a better show.

In his later career, Ansara frequently did voice acting in animated TV shows, movies and video games, including three iterations of the comic superhero in "Batman" (1992–1995), "The New Adventures of Batman" (1997–1999) and "Batman Beyond" (199–2001), playing the villain Mr. Freeze, a character Ansara would reprise in the film adaptation of "Batman Beyond" (1999) and in several "Batman" video games.  He also provided the voice for the recurring character General Warhawk in the animated series "Rambo" (1986).  Mr. Ansara passed away at his home in Calabasas, California on July 31, 2013 at age 91.

R. G. Armstrong

R. G. Armstrong was an American playwright and film and television actor.  Trained at the Actors Studio in New York, his filmography lists more than 180 credits spanning 50 years.  Armstrong made his first film appearance in "Garden of Eden" (1954).  While working on the television show "The Westerner," he met writer/director Sam Peckinpah, who cast him in several of his films, including "Ride the High Country" (1962), "Major Dundee" (1965), "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" (1970) and "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973).  Armstrong was also cast in three Warren Beatty films, including "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), "Reds" (1981) and "Dick Tracy" (1990), in which he played the villain Pruneface.  Other film credits include the role of Cap'n Dan in "The Great White Hope" (1970) and General Phillips "Predator" (1987).

Armstrong was best-known as a character actor in television Westerns.  He appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Sheriff Tomlinson in the pilot episode "The Sharpshooter," which was written by Sam Peckinpah, and episode 4, "The Marshal," which was both written and directed by Peckinpah.  "The Marshal" introduced the title character played by Paul Fix after Armstrong's sheriff was killed by marauding outlaws.  Other TV series in which he guest-starred include "The Texan" (1958–1959), "Lawman" (1959), "Maverick" (1959–1960), "Bonanza" (1959–1966), "Cheyenne" (1960–1961), "Perry Mason" (1958–1962), "Laramie" (1960–1962), "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1960–1962), "Gunsmoke" (1961–1967), "Wagon Train" (1962), "The Virginian" (1963–1967), "The F.B.I." (1965–1967), "T.H.E. Cat" (1966), "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979–1983), "Dynasty" (1982), "Friday the 13th" (1987–1989) and "L. A. Law" (1992–1993).  R. G. Armstrong passed away on July 27, 2012 at age 95.

Herb Armstrong

Herb Armstrong was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 50 shows in a career spanning more than 40 years.  He acted in several popular series, including "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), "The F.B.I." (1965–1974) and "Barnaby Jobes" (1973–1980).  Armstrong made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the hotel clerk in "The Actress" (episode 94).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Armstrong also appeared in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Charles Arnt

Charles Arnt appeared in THE RIFLEMAN pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter," as Wes Tippert, uncle of the young sharpshooter played by Dennis Hopper.  Arnt was a veteran character actor whose career spanned 30 years.

Larry Asmus

Larry Asmus was an American child actor.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and "My Three Sons" (1960–1972).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying one of the boys at the picnic in "Three-Legged Terror" (episode 30).

Phyllis Avery

Phyllis Avery was an American television and film actress.  She performed in more than 50 movies and television shows in career spanning nearly 50 years.  She made her film debut in "Queen for a Day" (1951), playing the role of Marjorie.  She had her first recurring role as the lead actress in "The Ray Milland Show: Meet Mr. McNulty" (1953–1955).  Avery made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Leona Bartell in "The Baby Sitter" (episode 52).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, she appeared in "Laramie" (1959–1963) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

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Alice Backes

Alice Backes was an American actress who appeared in 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  Her film appearances included roles in "Up in Central Park" (1948), the Susan Hayward classic, "I Want to Live!" (1958), "It Started with a Kiss" (1959), the Doris Day comedy, "That Touch of Mink" (1962), "Half a House" (1975) and the Disney films, "Snowball Express" (1976) and "The Cat from Outer Space" (1978).  She also portrayed Hedda Hopper in the Jill Clayburgh-James Brolin biopic, "Gable and Lombard" (1976).  Backes guest-starred in various popular TV series of the 1959s, 70s and 80s, including "Hennesey" (1959–1962), "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), "Hazel" (1961–1962), "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" (1963–1965), "Bewitched" (1964–1966), "Mayberry R.F.D." (1970–1971) and "Columbo" (1974–1997), among many other shows.  She also had a recurring role playing Vickie in the comedy series, "Bachelor Father" (1957–1962).  Backes made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Isabel Dent in "Mail Order Groom" (episode 56).  She also guest-starred in numerous iconic westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "The Big Valley" (1968).

Parley Baer

Parley Baer was an American radio, film and television actor.  He performed in more than 250 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly six decades.  Baer began his career as a performer with the circus and developed an affinity for animals, both of which became lifelong interests.  During fallow periods in his acting career, he returned to performing with circus and animal acts, serving as a ringmaster for Circus Vargas and Barnum & Bailey, a board member of the community L.A. Circus, a docent at the Los Angeles Zoo, publicity writer for Al. G. Barnes Circus, and performing in an act with seven tigers at Jungleland in Thousand Oaks, California.

In his early career, Baer also worked in the radio industry, later founding the Pioneer Pacific Broadcasters with Ralph Edwards, who went on to have a long television career.  He played the role of Chester in the radio version of "Gunsmoke" (1952–1961), a role played by Dennis Weaver in the long-running classic TV western series.  Baer had recurring roles in several series, including Darby in "The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet" (1955–1965), Mayor Arthur J. Henson in "The Addams Family(1964–1966), "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1981–1984) and Buck in "Newhart" (1984–1987).  He also guest-starred in numerous other popular TV series, often making multiple appearances playing different characters in a variety of genres, including the crime drama, "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and numerous comedy series, including "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1969), "Petticoat Junction" (1965–1970) and "Bewitched" (1966–1972).  Baer made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Walter Mathers in "A Matter of Faith" (episode 34) and Neff Parker in "A Friend in Need" (episode 123).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Baer guest-starred in many other western series, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Raymond Bailey

Raymond Bailey was an American stage, television and film actor.  He performed in nearly 150 different movies, plays and television shows in a career spanning more than three decades.  Bailey spent many years trying to get his career off the ground, intermittently active in military services, including joining the Merchant Marine during World War II.  He eventually succeeded at breaking into the industry, performing in well-known series such as "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1965) and "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  He is best known for his recurring role as Mr. Drysdale in the popular sitcom "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971).

Bailey made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing Colonel Jess Whiteside in "The Photographer" (episode 18).  In addition to the RIFLEMAN, Bailey also appeared in the Western series "Gunsmoke" (1955–1965).

Roy Barcroft

Roy Barcroft was a prolific American character actor.  He appeared in more than 350 movies and television shows in a career spanning 40 years.  Barcroft accidentally fell into acting after being discovered while acting as a hobby to improve his speaking skills for his job as a salesman.  Although most of his early roles were uncredited, Barcroft went on to become one of the most recognizable faces in the western movie genre, often typecast as the villain.  He had a recurring role as Colonel Logan in the western series "The Adventures of Spin and Marty" (1955).  He also made several guest appearances in "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956).  He had a recurring role as Roy in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), although he occasionally also played different roles.  Barcroft made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Stevens in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in numerous other popular western series, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Rawhide" (1961–1965), "Bonanza" (1962–1966), and "Laramie" (1959–1963).

Katherine Bard

Katharine Bard was an American actress.  She performed in 50 different movies and television shows in a career lasting nearly two decades.  She made appearances in various popular television series, including "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).

Bard appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, in which she played Beth Landis in "The Trade" (episode 24).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Bard also made an appearance in the Western series "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Baynes Barron

Baynes Barron was an American actor.  He appeared in more than 100 television shows and movies over a 30–year career.  Many of his roles were uncredited.  He appeared in many popular western series, including "The Adventures of Kit Carson" (1951–1952), "Death Valley Days" (1954–1955), "Annie Oakley" (1956–1957), "Lawman" (1959–1962), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  Barron also performed in several popular series of the 1960s, including "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Gus 'Gustav' Kelso in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49) and Trooper Kirk in "The Deserter" (episode 65).  He also appeared in an episode of "Branded" (1965–1966), which starred Chuck Connors in his second hit TV western series.

Patricia Barry

Patricia Barry, born Patricia White, is an American actress who has appeared in more than 130 television shows and movies in a career spanning 50 years.  Barry was signed to Columbus Pictures following her graduation from Stephens College, Columbia, MO.  She appeared in numerous TV series and soap operas popular in the 1950s through the 90s, including "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) "Dr. Kildaire" (1962–1965), "The Bold Ones: The Lawyers" (1972), "Columbo" (1975), "Charlie's Angels" (1976), "Guiding Light" (1984–1987) and "Murder, She Wrote" (1989–1994).  Barry also starred in her own TV series, playing the title role of Kate Harris in "Harris Against the World" (1965–1965).  She also appeared in two critically acclaimed made-for-TV movies, "First, You Cry" (1978) and "Bogie" (1980).  She made three appearances in The RIFLEMAN, portraying Adele Adams in "Three-Legged Terror" (episode 30) and "The Woman" (episode 32), as well as Laurie Hadley in "A Time for Singing" (episode 64).  Barry also guest-starred in other TV westerns, including "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Fern Barry

Fern Barry was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in nearly 50 television shows and movies in a career spanning more than 40 years.  Many of her acting roles were uncredited.  Working mostly during the 1930s, 50s and 60s, Barry appeared in several popular TV series, including and "The Donna Reed Show" (1960) and the popular crime drama series "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  She made two appearances in The RIFLEMAN, portraying a townswoman in "The Woman" (episode 32) and Callie Sawyer in "The Horse Traders" (episode 60).  Barry also guest–starred in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) and "Rawhide" (1960).

James Barton

James Barton was an American vaudevillian, as well as a stage, television and film character actor.  He appeared in more than 30 television shows and movies in a career spanning 40 years.  Born to a theatrical family, Barton was a song-and-dance man who performed in musical revues and dramatic plays on Broadway from the 1920s through the 1950s.  His stage credits include "Sweet and Low" (1930–1931), "Tobacco Road" (1933–1941), "The Iceman Cometh" (1946–1947) and "Paint Your Wagon" (1951–1952).  His movie career began in the silent film era, and his more memorable film appearances include "The Time of Your Life" (1948), "Here Comes the Groom" (1951) and "The Misfits" (1961).   He also made cameo appearances throughout his career, including two episodes of "The Ed Sullivan Show" (1950, 1951).  Barton guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Matt 'Pop' Simmons in "Legacy" (episode 51).

Joe Bassett

Joe Bassett, born Joseph George Bassett, was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 40 television shows and movies in a short-lived career of 13 years.  Many of his acting roles were in westerns, including "Tales of the Texas Rangers" (1955–1959), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961).  Bassett made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nat Gilkey in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7) and Sammy Morody in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).

Arthur Batanides

Arthur Batanides, born Joseph George Batanides, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in 130 television shows and movies in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He co-starred in a crime drama, "Johnny Midnight" (1960) with Edmund O'Brien.  He also appeared in numerous other popular series of the 1960s, including "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966).  Batanides remained a familiar face through the 1970s, making several appearances in "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), "The Odd Couple" (1970–1975) and "Happy Days" (1974–1984), among many other shows.  Despite a short filmography, he is remembered for his portrayal of Mr. Kirkland in several of the "Police Academy" films.  He also appeared in the Cecil B. DeMille classic, "The Ten Commandments" (1956) and the John Wayne film, "Brannigan" (1975).  Batanides made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Littleboy Sherman in "Old Man Running" (episode 166).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Wild, Wild West" (1965–1968).

Alan Baxter

Alan Baxter was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 120 television shows and movies in a career spanning 35 years.  He was a guest star in several episodes of popular series from the 1960s, including "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Baxter made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sid Fallon in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961) and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963).

Hal Baylor

Hal Baylor was an American television and film actor, as well as a heavyweight boxing champion.  He appeared in 500 television shows and 70 movies in a career spanning 40 years.  Taking advantage of his athletic abilities, Baylor attended Washington State University on a scholarship.  Most of his early film roles were either uncredited or attributed to Hal Fieberling, including "The Set-Up" (1949), in which he appeared opposite Robert Ryan.  "The Set-Up" is still regarded as one of the best boxing films in movie history.  Tall and heavy-set, Baylor was dubbed "the Last of the Bigtime Bad Guys" and was frequently cast in tough guy roles.  He played in a range of genres, from crime dramas, such as "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), to superhero, such as "Batman" (1967), in which he played the character Mercury, and the science fiction cult classic movie, "A Boy and His Dog" (1975).  He also appeared in several war movies, including "The Sands of Iwo Jima" (1949), starring John Wayne.

Baylor was perhaps most familiar in TV westerns, appearing in many of the classic shows of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Cheyenne" (1956–1960), "Rawhide" (1959–1965), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1963–1967) and "Death Valley Days" (1962–1968).  Baylor made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charlie Crown in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103).

Stephen Bekassy

Stephen Bekassy, born Istvan Bekassy, was a Hungarian television and film actor.  He appeared in nearly 70 television shows and movies in a career spanning more than 30 years.  He made guest appearances in several popular series, including "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1959–1960) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Bekassy made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Count Brissara in "The Princess" (episode 125).

William "Billy" Benedict

William "Billy" Benedict was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 290 television shows and movies in a career spanning more than 50 years.  Benedict demonstrated an interest in acting early in life, participating in school productions and eventually making his way to Hollywood.  Many of his early film roles were uncredited as he began his career playing a variety of juvenile bit parts.  He made guest appearances in many popular series of the 1960s, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  Benedict made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dave Prentice in "Smokescreen" (episode 68).  Other westerns in which he guest–starred include "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Joe E. Benson

Joe E. Benson became an actor as a side career.  He appeared in a single move, "Redneck Zombies" (1989) and guest–starred in one episode of "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), portraying the deputy in "The Case of the Crippled Cougar" (1962).  Benson had known Chuck Connors personally, and according to the producers, they hired him on the star's recommendation. Benson appeared in 34 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, mostly playing uncredited parts.  In a small number of episodes, Benson played credited roles, including Mills in "The Actress" (episode 94), Merar in "The Score is Even" (episode 105) and a prison guard in "Requiem at Mission Springs" (episode 164).

James Best

James Best, born Jules Guy, is an American actor, director, producer, screenwriter, acting coach and musician.  He has appeared in more than 180 television shows and movies in a career spanning 60 years.  Following his service in the Army, Best performed in small plays and musicals until he was signed to a contract with Universal Pictures.   He guest-starred in numerous westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  He also guest-starred in many other popular series of the 1960s, including "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).   He is probably best-known for his recurring role as Sheriff Rosco Coltrane in "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979–1985).  Best made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bob Barrett in "The Day a Town Slept" (episode 139).

Lyle Bettger

Lyle Bettger was an American stage, film and television actor.  He attended Dickinson College and graduated from the Academy of Dramatic Arts in 1937.  He went on to appear in more than 50 different films, plays and television shows in a career spanning three decades.  Typecast as the villain, he is best known for playing the role of the wrathful elephant handler Klaus in the film, "The Greatest Show on Earth" (1952).

Bettger made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing Jay Jefferson in "The Wrong Man" (episode 27) and Holt in "Skull" (episode 124).  Handsome, with blond-hair and steely-eyes, Bettger played the villain in many westerns, including "Denver and Rio Grande" (1952), "The Great Sioux Uprising" (1953), "Drums Across the River" (1954) and "Gunfight at the OK Corral" (1957).

Helen Beverly

Helen Beverly was an American actress, working primarily in film.  Appearing in just 10 movies, several were uncredited roles, including the classic Biblical drama, "The Robe" (1953).  She appeared in "Green Fields" (1937), her earliest film, and she also appeared in one of the movies in the Charlie Chan franchise, "Black Magic" (1944).  Beverly made one appearance in The RIFLEMAN, portraying May Sweeney in "Seven" (episode 79).

Robert Bice

Robert Bice made five guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Joe Hallager in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40), Ben Smith in "The Coward" (episode 53), The Warden of New Mexico Territory in "Seven" (episode 79), and Len Richards in "Deadly Image" (episode 138).

Edward Binns

Edward Binns was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 160 TV shows and movies over 40 years.  He made his acting debut on Broadway and appeared in half dozen plays during his long career, including "Detective Story" (1949–1950) and "Ghosts" (1982).  His film credits include playing Captain Junket in "North by Northwest" (1959), Juror #6 in "Twelve Angry Men" (1957), Sen. Burkette in "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961) and Maj. Gen. Walter Bedell Smith in "Patton" (1970).  He guest–starred in many popular series of the late 1950s and early 1960s, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and several westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Binns also played the title character in the crime drama series "Brenner" (1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Kealy Thompson in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11).

William Bishop

William Bishop was an American stage, film and television actor who performed in more than 50 different plays, movies and television shows.  Raised in New York and New Jersey, his uncle arranged for him to have a summer job working at the theater of Suffern County, New York, where he worked with fellow actors Broderick Crawford, George Tobias, Jose Ferrer and Kent Smith.  Following that experience, he decided to leave college and continue acting.  Bishop toured with "Tobacco Road" and worked briefly at the Mercury Theatre in New York before venturing to Hollywood, where he was signed to a contract with MGM and later Columbia Pictures.  Most of his early work went uncredited.  Bishop made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing Dave Stafford in "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38).  He also appeared in lesser known Western films.

Whit Bissell

Whit Bissell, born Whitner Nutting Bissell, was a prolific American television and film actor who made his acting debut on Broadway.  He appeared in nearly 300 television shows and movies in a career spanning more than 40 years.  Although he appeared in several cult horror films of the 1950s, including the classic sci-fi thriller, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), he is probably best-known for portraying the mad scientist who turned Michael Landon into a beast in "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" (1957).  Bissell appeared in numerous TV shows of every genre popular in the 1950s through the early 80s, including "Peyton Place" (1965), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Marcus Welby, M.D." (1970–1973), "The Incredible Hulk" (1979–1980), and many western series, including "The Lone Ranger" (1947–1959), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Wagon Train" (1958–1964), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Virginian" (1963–1964).  Bissell also had recurring roles as Bert Loomis in the comedy series, "Bachelor Father" (1957–1962), and Lt. Gen. Heywood Kirk in the sci-fi series, "The Time Tunnel" (1966–1967).

Bissell made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam Barrows in "The Patsy" (episode 41), Gabe Fenway in "The Flourflusher" (episode 72), Volney Adams in "The Hangman" (episode 76) and Henry Waller in "The Long Gun from Tucson" (episode 121).  In 1994, Bissell received a lifetime achievement award from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films.  He also served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild and represented the actors branch of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences board of governors.

Sidney Blackmer

Sidney Blackmer was an American theater, film and television actor.  His career spanned 57 years, beginning in the silent film era.  He appeared in an uncredited role in "Perils of Pauline" (1914) and went on to spend the 1920s playing on Broadway, eventually debuting in talkies in 1929, in "The Love Racket."  In his prolific career, Blackmer appeared in scores of motion pictures—appearing in 12 movies in 1937 alone.  His film credits include two Edward G. Robinson classics, "Little Caesar" (1931) and "The Last Gangster" (1937), "Duel in the Sun" (1946), "High Society" (1956), "Tammy and the Bachelor" (1957) and "How to Murder Your Wife"(1965).   He co-starred with THE RIFLEMAN's Paul Fix in "The High and The Mighty" (1954), playing the gun-toting idiot.  His best-remembered film role was playing Roman Castevet in Roman Polanski's "Rosemary's Baby" (1968).

Beginnning in the 1930's, Blackmer portrayed President Theodore Roosevelt, a historical figure he played seven times in films and teleplays, including "This Is My Affair" (1937) , "The Monroe Doctrine" (1939), "Teddy the Rough Rider" (1940) and "My Girl Tisa" (1948).  In 1950, Blackmer won a Tony Award as Best Actor in a dramatic role for the Broadway production of "Come Back, Little Sheba."

Blackmer appeared in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing the recurring character of Judge Hanavan, who first appeared in the pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter."  He reprised the role of Judge Hanavan in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8) and "The Photographer" (episode 18).  Blackmer's numerous television credits include guest-starring roles in "The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse" (1949–1951), "Robert Montgomery Presents" (1952–1956), "Hallmark Hall of Fame" (1952–1956), "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "Bonanza" (1961–1968), "Dr. Kildare" (1962–1966), "Ben Casey" (1966), "The Name of the Game" (1968–1969).  Blackmer's last appearance on the Broadway stage was the 1963–64 production of "A Case of Libel," and his last acting role was in "Do You Take This Stranger? (1971).  Blackmer passed away two years later.

Patricia Blair

Patricia Blair was an American television actress whose career was active primarily in the 1950s and 1960s.   The Texas-born beauty began her career as a teenage model who went on to apprentice in summer stock before being discovered by Warner Bros.  She began acting in films under the names Patricia Blake and Pat Blake.   She appeared in a few films, including "Jump Into Hell" (1955), "Crime Against Joe" (1956) and "The Black Sleep" (1956), which reunited screen icons of the horror film genre Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney Jr., Basil Rathbone and John Carradine.   She also appeared in the suspense thriller "City of Fear" (1959), starring Vince Edwards.  She portrayed the Fashion Narrator in the Robert Redford romantic western "The Electric Horseman" (1979), co-starring Jane Fonda.

In 1962, Blair replaced actress Joan Taylor in a semi-regular role as Lou Mallory, Chuck Connor's love interest in the last season of THE RIFLEMAN.  Blair played the attractive red-haired, fiery Irish businesswoman, whose character was savvy Landowner and Owner of the General Store and the Madera House Hotel.  Blair's character of Lou Mallory appeared in 17 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN; she debuted in the title role of episode 145.  Blair also made guest television appearances on "The Bob Cummings Show" (1955–1959), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and she co-starred in "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), playing wife Rebecca Boone opposite Fess Parker.   She also had a recurring role as Goldy in the western adventure series "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959). 

Dan Blocker

Dan Blocker was an American actor born and raised in Texas.   He attended Texas Military Institute, played football at Hardin-Simmons University in 1946 and later graduated from Sul Ross State Teacher's College in Alpine, Texas, with a master's degree in drama.  Blocker was drafted into the Army and served in the Korean War as a First Sergeant.   Later, in Sonora, Texas; Carlsbad, New Mexico; and California, he taught high school English and drama.

A tall big bear of a man with a tender heart who played roles true to his character, Blocker appeared in several television shows in the late 1950's before landing the role for which he is best-remembered—Eric "Hoss" Cartwright in the long-running NBC western television series "Bonanza" (1959–1973).   He appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Pete Snipe in "The Sister" (episode 9).

In 1968, Blocker appeared with Frank Sinatra in "Lady in Cement," film sequel to "Tony Rome."  Director Robert Altman befriended Blocker while directing episodes of "Bonanza" and years later, he cast Blocker as Roger Wade in "The Long Goodbye."  Sadly, Blocker died before filming commenced and Sterling Hayden stepped into the role.  Released in 1973, the film was dedicated to Dan Blocker.

Lane Bradford

Lane Bradford was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 250 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 35 years.  A familiar face in western B movies and television series, many of his film roles in the 1940s and 50s were uncredited.  Bradford made his television debut in the crime drama series "Craig Kennedy, Criminologist" (1952).  He also appeared in "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Bradford guest-starred in most of the major western series of the 1950s and 60s, appearing mulitple times in many of them, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963) "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Martin in "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78).

Jim Breneman

Jim Brenaman made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a youngster, Dollar Ten, in "A Case of Identity" (episode 57).  His character was central to the story about a man who comes to North Fork searching for his long-lost son.

George Brenlin

George Brenlin, born George Henry Brendlinger, was an American actor who primarily worked in television.  He appeared in more than 60 television shows over his 30–year career.  Although he appeared mostly in westerns, Brenlin worked in other genres, including the crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the war–themed "Combat!" (1962–1967) and the police drama "Adam-12" (1969&@8211;1970).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying The Kid in "The Blowout" (episode 43).  He also guest-starred in other iconic westerns of the 50s, 60s and 70s, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Patricia Breslin

Patricia Breslin is an American actress who has spent most of her career working in television.  She has appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows over her career of 20 years.  After graduating from a convent in New Rochelle, New York, Breslin enrolled in the College of New Rochelle where she became trained in the theater department.  She made her television debut in the NBC TV production of "Romeo & Juliet" (1952), portraying Juliet.  She had recurring roles in "The People's Choice" (1955–1958) and "Peyton Place" (1964–1969), playing the roles of Amanda "Mandy" Peoples Miller and Laura Brooks, respectively.  Breslin was a popular actress during the 1950s and the 1960s, appearing in "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), playing opposite a young William Shatner in the 1960 episode, "Nick of Time." Breslin went on to play Meg Balwin in the daytime soap opera, "General Hospial," from 1966 to 1969.  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cora Severs in "Flowers by the Door" (episode 92).  Breslin guest-starred in the ther western series, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Diana Brewster

Diane Brewster was an American television and film actress.  She appeared in more than 60 television shows and movies in a career spanning nearly 35 years.  A versatile actress, she worked in a wide range of genres from westerns to crime dramas to family comedies.  Brewster had recurring roles in several of the most popular TV series of the 50s and 60s, including Samantha Crawford in "Maverick" (1957–1962), Wilhelmina "Steamboat Willy" Vanderveer in "The Islanders" (1960–1961) and Miss Canfield in the original run of "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  In "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), an innocent man on the run tries to stay ahead of the law while trying to prove he had not killed his beloved wife—Brewster was cast as Helen Kimble, the title character's murdered wife.  Brewster later appeared in a "Leave It To Beaver" movie, "Still the Beaver" (1983), and also the series reboot, "The New Leave It to Beaver" (1983–1989).  Brewster made guest appearances in many other popular series of the 50s and 60s, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964).  She made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fay Owens in "The Jealous Man" (episode 136).  Other western series in which she guest–starred include "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963) and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

Charles Briggs

Charlie Briggs was an American actor who worked primarily in television, particularly in the western genre.  He appeared in more than 60 television shows and movies in a career spanning 25 years.  He made his debut as an actor in the western series "Maverick" (1957–1962), playing the role of Little Jeb Plummer.   He appeared in the Disney film, "The Absent-Minded Professor" (1963), Clint Eastwood's Civil War Southern Gothic, "The Beguiled" (1971), the Charles Bronson crime drama, "Charley Varrick" (1973), Natalie Wood's last film, "Brainstorm" (1983) and the oscar-winning film, "Norma Rae" (1973).  Briggs made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Eli Manse in "The Jailbird" (episode 73) and Artie Quint in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103).  Other western series in which he guest-starred include "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Lillian Bronson

Lillian Bronson was an American character actress born in Rockport, New York.  She appeared in more than 160 movies and television shows in a career spanning 35 years.  She began her career on the Broadway stage, appearing in "Camille" with Lillian Gish and "Lean Harvest" with Leslie Banks.  Most of her early film roles, especially of the 1940s, were uncredited, and she tended to be cast in small roles playing society matrons, influential aides-de-camp or relatives, perhaps most memorably as Clark Gable's secretary in "The Hucksters" (1947), Claudette Colbert's sister in "Family Honeymoon" (1948) and Henry Fonda's mother in "Spencer's Mountain" (1963).

After making her way into television, Bronson appeared in many of the popular series of the 50s and 60s, including "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Her final television appearance was in "Happy Days" (1974–1984).  Bronson made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Adams in "The Legacy" (episode 51), an uncredited a role, and Elizabeth Favor in "The Baby Sitter" (episode 52).  She also guest-starred in other popular westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963) and "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962).  Bronson is probably best-remembered not as an actress, but as a model for a mural painted in 1974 by artist Kent Twitchell.  The painting was funded by the National Endowment for the Arts in support of a Los Angeles County art program.

Thomas Brown

Thomas Brown, born Thomas Edward Brown, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 60 years.  He was a guest star in many of the popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963).  Brown also played a few recurring roles, including Lt. Rovacs in the dramatic adventure series, "Mr. Lucky" (1959–1960) and Ed O'Connor in the long-running western series, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  Brown received a Star on the Walk of Fame for his contributions to the motion picture industry.  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the sheriff in "Skull" (episode 124).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Brown guest-starred in other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961) and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963).

Joe Brown

Joe Brown, Jr. was an American actor who worked primarily in television and film.  Between 1940 and the mid-1970s he appeared in more than two dozen movies and over a dozen television shows.  Most of his film roles were bit parts or uncredited.  He guest-starred in several popular series of the 50s and 60s, including "The Phil Silvers Show" (1955–1959), "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962) and "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961). His last TV role was in the James Garner vehicle, "Nichols" (1971–1972).  Brown made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jake in "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106).

Argentina Brunetti

Argentina Brunetti, born Argentina Ferrau, was an Argentinian film, television, stage and radio actress, as well as a writer.  She worked in film and television, frequently cast in ethnic roles in a career spanning 65 years.  She grew up in an acting family, and was guided by her famous mother Mimi Aguglia, a stage actress, as they toured together throughout Europe and South America.  She signed a contract with MGM pictures in 1937 and was given assignments dubbing voices in Italian.  Many of her early film roles were uncredited.  Brunetti's first credited film appearance was in the classic Frank Capra film, "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946), in which she played the part of Mrs. Martini.

Brunetti appeared in many of the popular series of the 1950s and 60s, including "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "The Untouchables" (1969–1963) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968).  She guest-starred in virtually all of the major westerns of her time, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  She was a working actress until her death, including making an appearance in "Everybody Loves Raymond" (1996–2005), played the role of Zia Sarina in "Mia Famiglia."  Married to Miro Brunetti, a foreign correspondent in Hollywood, she co-founded the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

William Bryant

William Bryant was an American actor who appeared in over 200 film and television roles in a career spanning 45 years.  He made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Sandy in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11), Jerry in "Shivaree" (episode 19), Karl Hollis in "Gunfire" (episode 126), and Trooper Coley in "The Assailants" (episode 149).

Edgar Buchanan

Edgar Buchanan was an American character actor who appeared in over 100 films and dozens of television series, including several long-lived sitcoms.  In a career spanning four decades, he played grizzled, gravelly-voiced characters and was frequently cast in westerns.  His most well-known and lovable character was Uncle Joe Carson, who appeared in all 222 episodes of "Petticoat Junction," (1963-1970), 17 episodes of "Green Acres" (1965-1969), and, in 1968, three episodes of "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962-1971).  In his last role, the 1974 film "Benji," he co-starred with the dog (Higgins) from his stint on "Petticoat Junction."  Buchanan made six appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Grandpa Fogerty in "The Long Goodbye" (Episode 119) and the recurring character of Doc Burrage in five, including "The Pet" (episode 15), "The Second Witness" (episode 23), "The Trade" (episode 24), "The Deadly Wait" (episode 26), and "The Angry Man" (episode 31).

Robert Burton

Robert Burton was an American actor of television and film in the 1950s and early 60s.  His first major screen credit was playing Wayne Langmuir in "Desperate Search" (1952), starring Howard Keel and featuring Keenan Wynn.  Appearing mostly in forgettable pictures such as "I Was a Teenage Frankenstein" (1957), "Invasion of the Animal People" (1962), "The Slime People" (1963), his most noteworthy films include "The Bad and the Beautiful" (1952), "The Big Heat" (1953), "Compulsion" (1959) and "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962).  He appeared in numerous television shows, including "You Are There," "The Lone Ranger," "Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre," "The Californians," "The Texan," "Tales of Wells Fargo," "Dennis the Menace," "Wagon Train," "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis," and "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color."   Burton was one of six actors to play the semi-regular character Doc Burrage in THE RIFLEMAN.  He played the role in just one episode, "The Princess" (episode 127).

Archie Butler

Archie Butler was an American stuntman, stunt coordinator and actor.  Between his acting and stunt credits, Butler appeared in more than 20 movies and television shows in a career spanning 30 years.  He provided stunts for several films, including the drama "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1939), starring Charles Laughton and Maureen O'Hara; the war film "Major Dundee" (1965), starring Charlton Heston, Richard Harris, Jim Hutton, James Coburn and Michael Anderson, Jr.; the drama "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), starring Steve McQueen, Ann-Margret, Edward G. Robinson and Karl Malden; and the western "The Wild Bunch" (1969), starring William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan and Edmond O'Brien.  He also performed stunt work for the westerns "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961) and THE RIFLEMAN.  He brought his skills as an expert horseman to THE RIFLEMAN, when he joined the crew at age 60.  According to THE RIFLEMAN producer Arnold Laven, Butler probably appeared in more episodes than anyone else, with the exception of the regular cast (although, he probably was in more episode then some of them).  In addition to his stunt work, Butler had minor acting parts in the westerns "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

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King Calder

King Calder was an American actor who primarily worked in television, appearing in more than 60 movies and television shows over 15 years.  Calder had a recurring role in the drama series "Martin Kane" (1949–1954), playing the role of Lt. Grey.  He remained a familiar face in television throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, making appearances in many of the popular series of that era, including "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Hennesey" (1959–1962), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962).  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying King Croxton in "The Assault" (episode 102).  Calder also guest-starred in other popular TV westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Lawman" (1958–1962) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Philip Carey

Philip Carey, born Eugene Josh Carey, was an American film television and film actor who appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 60 years.  Prior to working in the entertainment industry, he served in the United States Marines during World War II, in which he was injured, and the Korean War.  Tall and ruggedly handsome, he also had a deep mellifluous voice, and so, landed many assignments doing narration and voice-over, including the Granny Goose potato chips commercials.  His first acting job was a succession of different roles in the popular "Ford Theater" TV anthology series of the 1950s.  Carey would appear mutiple times or play recurring roles in many TV series, including Lieutenant Michael Rhodes in the adventure series "Tales of the 77th Bengal Lancers" (1956–1957), the title role in the crime drama "Philip Marlowe" (1959–1960) and Captain Edward Parmalee in the western "Laredo" (1965–1967).   He also guest-starred in other popular series of the 1950s and the 1960s, including the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and numerous westerns, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  Carey is best-known for his long-running portrayal of tycoon, Asa Buchanan, in the daytime drama "One Life to Live" (1968– 2008), which was also his final role.  Carey made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dr. Simon Battle in "Death Trap" (episode 109).

Olive Carey

Olive Carey was an American film and television actress who appeared in 75 movies, many of which were shorts, and television shows in a career spanning nearly 55 years.  Most of her early film roles were credited to either Olive Golden or Olive Fuller Golden.  She had a recurring role as Elsie in the comedy series "Mr. Adams and Eve" (1957–1958).  She portrayed Mrs. Jorgensen in John Ford's "The Searchers" (1956).  She also had a part in "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" (1957), portraying Mrs. Clanton.  She guest-starred in many popular western series of the 1950s and 60s, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963) and "Lawman" (1958–1962).  Carey made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ma Wilson in "Shivaree" (episode 19).

Harry Carey, Jr.

Harry Carey, Jr. is a prolific American film and television character actor.  He has appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows in a career spanning 65 years.  He has been a familiar fixture in westerns, but has appeared in a wide range of genres, from popular series of the 1960s, including the crime drama series "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), to cult classic films of the 1980s, including "Gremlins" (1984), in which he played Mr. Anderson, and "Back to the Future Part III" (1990), in which he made a cameo appearance as a saloon old-timer.  Carey and his father both appeared in the classic Howard Hawks western, "Red River" (1948); although, they did not share any scenes together.  He also was associated with the so-called John Ford Stock Company, appearing in many of the legendary director's films, including "3 Godfathers" (1948), "Wagon Master" (1950), "Rio Grande" (1950), "The Long Gray Line" (1955) and "Cheyenne Autumn" (1964).

Carey appeared in virtually every major western series of his era; although, he is perhaps most often recognized for his recurring role as Bill Burnett in the original, as well as the movie and the various reboots of "The Adventures of Spin and Marty" (1955).  He appeared in "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  Carey made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lt. Paul Rolfe in "The Deserter" (episode 65) and Lieutenant Vaughn in "The Journey Back" (episode 115).  In 1987, Carey received a Golden Boot for his contributions to the western genre, and in 2003, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  Carey also has a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Benny Carle

Benny Carle is an American television and radio personality.  He was given the opportunity to make a guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN while working for WAFF-TV, the ABC affiliate in Birmingham, Alabama.  At the time, ABC was working on a publicity campaign in which one on-air personality from each of its affiliate stations was selected to make cameo appearances in various network programs.  Carle is remembered for his afternoon kids' show (1965 to 1977) in which Chuck Connors, who offered him the part in THE RIFLEMAN, had appeared several months earlier.  Carle portrayed Amos Blaine in "The Assailants" (episode 149).

Thomas Carney

Thomas Carney was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 50 television shows and movies during his 40-year career.  He was a guest star in various popular series of the 1950s and 60s, including "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Moss Jackman in "Lou Mallory" (Episode 145).  He also guest-starred in some of the other iconic western series of the era, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963) and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961).

John Carpenter

Johnny Carpenter, born Jasper Carpenter, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in nearly 60 television shows and movies over a period of more than 30 years, although most of his roles were uncredited.  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stage coach driver in "Nora" (episode 75).  He also guest-starred in a few other popular westerns of the time, including "The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951–1958) and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975).

Carleton Carpenter

Carleton Carpenter is an American stage, film and television actor, as well as a magician, author and songwriter.  He has appeared in nearly 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  Prior to signing to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Carpenter worked on Broadway, both as a magician and an actor.  He appeared in many films starring movie and stage legends such as Ray Bolger in "Three to Make Ready," Bert Lahr and Angela Lansbury in "Hotel Paradiso" and Judy Garland in the film "Summer Stock" (1950).  Carpenter had starring roles in "Fearless Fagan" (1952), co-starring Janet Leigh, and "Sky Full of Moon" (1952), with Jan Sterling.  Carpenter appeared in several popular series of the 1950s and 60s, including "G.E. True Theater" (1953–1962) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying George Collins in "The Coward" (episode 153).

Carleton had many talents besides acting; they included composing songs and writing novels.  Among his hits compositions were "Christmas Eve," "Cabin in the Woods" and "Ev'ry Other Day."  During the 1970s and 80s, Carpenter became a best-selling mystery novelist.  One of his more popular books, "Deadhead" (1974), was adapted to a Broadway musical.  He also authored several short stories, which were featured in the Alfred Hitchcock and Ellery Queen mystery magazines.

Paul Carr

Paul Carr made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Derek Hanaway in "Shivaree" (episode 19), Garth Healey in "The Woman" (episode 32), Fred Harris in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50), and Doug Carter in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68).

John Carradine

John Carradine was an American actor who had an extremely prolific film career, while simultaneously maintaining a stage career in classic leading roles.  Tall and gaunt, with a distinctive sonorous baritone voice, Carradine became a venerable film icon, with over 300 film credits and more than 100 television credits in a career that spanned 65 years.  Born the son of a reporter/artist and surgeon, he grew up in Pougkeepsie, New York.  He attended Christ Church School, and studied sculpture at Graphic Art School.  As a young man, he roamed the South selling sketches.   He made his acting debut in "Camille" in New Orleans theater in 1925.  Two years later, he went to Los Angeles where he worked in local theater.  He applied as scenic designer to Cecil B. DeMille, who rejected his designs but gave him voice work in several films.  His film debut was in the role of Peter Richmond in "To Able David."

Carradine was the prot ég é and close friend of John Barrymore.  Usually cast in supporting roles, he appeared in many movie classics, including 10 John Ford films, among them, "Stagecoach" (1939), "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), and "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962).  He also portrayed Aaron in "The Ten Commandments" (1956).

Carradine was frequently cast in horror and western genre films.  He made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Abel Gross in "The Photographer" (episode 18) and James Barrow McBride in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  Near the end of his life, Carradine claimed to have appeared in more movies than any other actor, surpassing the record set by Donald Crisp, the Oscar winning actor and director who had started in silent films and had appeared in numerous one and two reel films, many of them lost.  He was the father of sons Chris, David, Keith and Robert Carradine.

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter was an American film and television actor who had a short career of just five years.  While attending Mark Keppel High School, he and a friend formed the band "4 Below Zero," and in 1967, the band released the song "It's Sally's Birthday Today" on DoubleShot Records.  He also did an album with Barry Manilow in the late 70s.  During his brief stint as an actor, Jimmy appeared in 12 television shows and one movie, including some of the most popular TV series of the 1950s and 60s.  He guest-starred in the crime drama "The Lawless Years" (1959–1961), "Route 66" (1960–1964), "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and the long-running western series, "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  He also appeared in the movie "The Jayhawkers" (1959), playing the character Paul Dubois.  Carter made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charley in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).

Conlan Carter

Conlan Carter, born Chester Conlan Carter, is an American television and film actor.  He has appeared in nearly 40 television shows and movies over a career spanning more than 25 years.  Raised on a farm in rural Missouri, Carter attended Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau on an athletic scholarship.  He then joined the United States Air Force and served two years, during which he developed a lifelong interest in flying.  Following his military service, Carter went to San Francisco where he studied under Mara Alexander Gilbert at the Bay City Actor's Lab.  He demonstrated great versatility as an actor, and played roles in genres ranging from crime dramas to action series to westerns.  Among the handful of recurring characters, he portrayed C.E. Carruthers in "The Law and Mr. Jones" (1960–1962) and Doc in "Combat!" (1962–1967), a role for which he received a 1964 Emmy nomination for Outstanding Performance in a Supporting Role by an Actor.

Carter made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Haslam Jackman in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 145) and reprising that role in "Lou Mallory" (episode 167), an episode that introduced new cast regular Patricia Blair.  Carter also guest-starred in many of the iconic westerns of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, including "Johnny Ringo" (1959–1960), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).  He also appeared in many other popular series, including "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980) and "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979–1985).   Although he had a successful career in the entertainment industry, Carter eventually abandoned acting to pursue his dream of being a pilot.

Mel Carter

Mel Carter made eight guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played an outlaw on "End of a Young Gun" (episode 3), Walkerman in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8), a cowhand in "The Challenge" (episode 28), Jed Healy in "The Woman" (episode 32), Arnie Grady in "The Journey Back" (episode 115), Jeems in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141), George Vale's partner Bo Jackman in "Lou Mallory" (episode 145), and Mark Jones in "Death Never Rides Alone" (episode 147).  Carter appeared in many television shows from the late 1950's through late 1980's.  In 1987, he co-starred with Chuck Connors in "Werewolf," an episode of the "Father Jude" series.

Lynn Cartier

Lynn Cartier guest-starred in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Porter in "Panic" (episode 47) and Alice Bedford in "Hero" (episode 59).

Penelope Sue Carver

Penelope Sue Carver guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the little girl who dies from Anthrax in "The Pet" (episode 15).

Allen Case

Allen Case was an American actor who grew up in Dallas, Texas.  He attended Southern Methodist University for two years and went on to have a career in television from 1958 to 1982.  With more than 30 television credits, he was frequently cast in cowboy roles.  His acting career began performing on a local TV variety program.  After several months, he moved to New York and successfully tried out for a singing spot on Arthur Godfrey's morning show.  His stint on Godfrey's show led to several nightclub engagements and parts in two Broadway-bound musicals, "Reuben, Reuben" and "Pleasure Dome," both of which closed out of town.  More work followed in nightclubs and on Broadway, as well as an occasional return to the Arthur Godfrey show, as well an appearance on Jack Parr.

Case had a small part in the 1958 movie version of "Damn Yankees," which brought him to California and led to roles in a succession of western genre series, including "Bronco," "Wagon Train," "Gunsmoke," "Have Gun Will Travel" and "Sugarfoot".  He appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeremy Ashford in "The Young Englishman" (episode 13).  Case returned to New York to appear in an off-Broadway production of "Once Upon a Mattress," and from there went on to co-star with Henry Fonda in the TV series "The Deputy," for which he is best remembered.

Malcolm Cassell

Malcolm Cassell is an American film and television actor, who has had a brief career of nine years in which he has appeared in 16 movies and television shows.  He had a recurring role as Tommy Walker in the comedy series "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963), made several appearances in "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), and he portrayed Billy the Kid in the western series, "The Rebel" (1959–1961).  His final screen appearance was in "Pirates of Tortuga" (1961), in which he portrayed Kipper.  Cassell made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joey Merrick in "The Spoiler" (episode 61).

Bill Catching

Bill Catching, born Jerome P. Catching, was an American film and television actor, and also a stuntman.  He appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows and in a career spanning almost 30 years.  He made guest-starred in numerous popular TV series of the 1950s and 60s, including several appearances in the crime drama series "Boston Blackie" (1951–1953), the Ann Francis detective series, "Honey West" (1966) and the David Carradine series, "Kung Fu" (1974).  Catching is most recognizable for his many appearances in virtually every major western of the 50s and 60s, frequently making multiple appearances in different roles, including "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951–1958), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1966).  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tom Williamson in "The Second Witness" (episode 23).   In 1994, he received the Golden Boot award for his significant contributions to the western genre.

Bill Cerone

Bill Cerone has just two screen credits: he appeared in the dramatic TV series, "Channing" (1963–1964) as Bob in the episode, "The Potato Bash World," and in THE RIFLEMAN as Mortimer in "Guilty Conscience" (episode 137).

Robert Chadwick

Robert Chadwick was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in 10 movies and television shows in a brief career of a little over a decade.  He appeared in several popular series of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).  In addition to his work in television, Chadwick played the role of the father in David Lynch's surreal short film, "The Grandmother" (1970).  He guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Eskamimzin in "The Indian" (episode 21).

Larry Chance

Larry Chance was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 50 films and television shows over a career spanning nearly 30 years.  Although many of his film roles were uncredited, he was cast in most of the major western series of the 1950s and 60s, including "Annie Oakley" (1954&8211;1956), "Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951&8211;1958), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954&8211;1959), "Bonanza" (1959&8211;1973), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957&8211;1962) and "The Virginian" (1962&8211;1971).  He guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lobo in "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106).

James Chandler

James Chandler was an American film and television actor who appeared in nearly 70 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  During the 1950s through the 70s, Chandler guest-starred in various popular crime dramas, including "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Bourbon Street Beat" (1959–1960) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the rancher in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40) and Harvey Andrews in "The Silent Knife" (episode 89).  Chandler also appeared in many of the other classic western TV series of the period, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

John Davis Chandler

John Davis Chandler was an American film and television actor who appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  He performed in a wide variety of genres, including the Beat Generation-inspired, "Route 66" (1960–1964), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), Aaron Spelling's "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), starring Ricardo Montalban; and the mystery whodunit "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996),starring Angela Lansbury.  He made his final appearance in "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" (1993–1999).  Chandler guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Brooks in "The Executioner" (episode 142).  He also made appearances in a few others westerns, including "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Lon Chaney, Jr.

Lon Chaney, Jr., born Creighton Tull Chaney, was an American character actor whose filmography includes nearly 200 acting credits in a career spanning seven decades.  He is best-known for being the son of silent film star Lon Chaney and his many roles in monster movies.  He is the only actor to have portrayed all of the classic movie monsters: the title role in "The Wolf Man" (1941), Frankenstein's monster in "The Ghost of Frankenstein" (1942), a mummy in "The Mummy's Tomb" (1942) and a vampire in "Son of Dracula" (1943).  Chaney was memorialized for his most iconic role, the Wolf Man, in a 1997 edition of US postage stamps.   Chaney appeared in a small number of television shows in the 1950s, including a recurring role as Chingachgook in "Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans" (1957).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charlie Gordo in "Gunfire" (episode 126).

Lonny Chapman

Lonny Chapman was an American character actor of film who appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows, as well as some stage productions, in a career spanning 50 years.  He appeared in some of the great film classics, including Elia Kazan's "East of Eden" (1955), starring James Dean and Julie Harris; Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" (1963), starring Tippi Hedren and Sean Connery; and Martin Ritt's award-winning, "Norma Rae" (1979), starring Sally Field.  Although he performed in a wide range of genres, Chapman is identified with playing parts in mysteries, courtroom and crime dramas in nearly every decade of his career, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "The Defenders" (1961–1965), "Judd for the Defense" (1967–1969), "Police Story" (1973–1977), "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996) and "NYPD Blue" (1993–2005).  he also played the role of the convict Jake in Woody Allen's comedic crime caper "Take the Money and Run" (1969).  Chapman made guest appearances in other popular series, including "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973) and "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990).  He guest-starred in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Stanley in "Long Trek" (episode 93) and Scully Potter in "And the Devil Makes Five" (episode 161).  He also appeared in several other classic TV westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).  In 1972, Chapman received a Bronze Wrangler award for his role in the Mark Rydell western, "The Cowboys" (1972), which was adapted from a novel by William Dale Jennings.

Lewis Charles

Lewis Charles, born Lewis Cholost, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 140 movies and television shows in a career spanning 30 years.  He guest-starred in a wide variety of different genres, making appearances in crime dramas, including "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), as well as the popular family series, "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the live-action "Batman" (1966–1968) and the espionage action series "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  Charles made three guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Slade in "The Indian" (episode 21), Eber Tate in "One Went to Denver" (episode 25) and Pascal in "Skull" (episode 124).  He also guest-starred in several other classic westerns, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Kim Charney

Kim Charney is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows in a decade-long career.  Charney may be best-remembered for his recurring role as Terry Richmond in "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  He also appeared in the film-noir "Suddenly" (1954), starring Frank Sinatra, in which he played the role of Peter Benson III, or "Pidge." Charney made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Carey MacDonald in "The Angry Man" (episode 31).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in several other classic westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Tales of the Texas Rangers" (1955–1959), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Lawman" (1958–1962) and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963).

Alden "Stephen" Chase

Alden Stephen Chase, born Guy Alden Chase, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 130 movies and television shows during his 34-year career, with many roles uncredited.  Among his films roles, he portrayed Dr. T. Hallen in the sci-fi cult classic, "The Blob" (1958), starring Steve McQueen.  Chase guest-starred in numerous popular programs of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, especially in the crime drama and western genres.  He guest-starred in "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), as well as the western series, "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Death Valley Days" (1958–1961) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).   He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colonel Stroud in "The Sheridan Story" (episode 16).

Virginia Christine

Virginia Christine, born Virginia Christine Kraft, was an American film and television actress who appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows in a career spanning 35 years.  She attended the University of California, Los Angeles, where she met her acting coach and future husband, Fritz Feld.  In 1942, Christine signed an acting contract with Warner Bros.  Although primarily a television actress, she appeared in a few high-profile films, including the noir film, "The Killers" (1946), starring Burt Lancaster, in which she played the role of Lilly Harmon Lubinsky; and the sci-fi cult classic, "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1956), in which she portrayed Wilma Lentz.

Christine garnered roles in almost every genre in television, appearing in many popular series, including the thrillers, "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), as well as crime dramas and mystery series, including "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  She is probably best-remembered as Mrs. Olsen in the Folgers Coffee ads.

Christine made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Hardy in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49) and Mrs. Dalrymple in "The Long Goodbye" (episode 119).  She also guest-starred in numerous westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961) , "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), in which she had a recurring role as Ovie Swenson, "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Pat Close

Pat Close was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nine movies and television shows in seven years.  Although he had a brief acting career, Close guest-starred in several popular TV series, including "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966), "G.E. True Theater" (1953–1962), "Twilight Zone" (1959–1954) and "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963).  He also had a starring role as the son in Andy Warhol's "Imitation of Christ" (1967).  Close made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Noah Fergus in "The Queue" (episode 110).

James Coburn

James Coburn was an American actor, producer, director, writer and screenwriter.  He studied acting at UCLA, before moving to New York to study at The Stella Adler Studio of Acting   His long and versatile 45-year career garnered him more than 150 credits as an actor.   He worked with some of Hollywood's most celebrated directors and appeared in several films classics, including John Sturges" films "The Magnificent Seven" (1960) and "The Great Escape" (1963), Sam Peckinpah's "Major Dundee" (1965), "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973) and "Cross of Iron" (1977).  He became a widely recognized star with his James Bond spy spoofs playing the title roles in "Our Man Flint" (1966) and "In Like Flint" (1967).  Coburn received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Glen Whitehouse in the film "Affliction" (1997), in addition to nominations from both the Screen Actors Guild and the Independent Spirit Awards.

Coburn made two guest appearances on THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cy Parker in "The Young Englishman" (episode 13) and Ambrose in "The High Country" (episode 122).  Coburn was already well-established in the western genre prior to his appearances on THE RIFLEMAN, having made his film debut in the western "Ride Lonesome" (1959), followed by multiple appearances in both "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Pamela Cole

Pamela Cole guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sally in "The Schoolmaster" (episode 86).  Cole is Chuck Connor's niece and was recruited to play one of the school children, along with Steven Gardner, the son of THE RIFLEMAN producer Arthur Gardner and Connors' four sons Mike, Steve, Jeff and Kevin.

Johnny Collier

Johnny Collier is an American film and television actor who has appeared in nine movies and television shows in a little over 40 years.  He appeared in the popular family series "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963).  Collier guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Howie in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68).  He also made guest appearances in the westerns "Maverick" (1957–1962) and "Law of the Plainsman" (1959).

Russell Collins

Russell Collins was an American film and television actor who appeared in nearly 90 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  He was a versatile actor who appeared in popular shows from each decade during which he was active.  He guest-starred in various early television shows, including the mystery series "Suspense" (1949–1954) and the comedy series "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963).  Collins made guest appearances in several crime dramas, including "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), as well as the popular TV series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), in which he made several guest appearances and also the sci-fi thrillers "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965).

In addition to television, Collins made several film appearances.  He played the role of Mr. Qua in the Marilyn Monroe noir film "Niagara" (1953); he potrayed Mr. Hastings in "Bad Day at Black Rock" (1955), starring Spencer Tracy; and he played the part of Knapp in the Sidney Lumet film "Fail-Safe" (1964), starring Henry Fonda.

Collins guest-starred in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Willard Denton in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6) and Charlie Willard in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11).  Collins made guest appearances in several other iconic westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

Al Collins

Albert Richard "Jazzbeaux" Collins was an American disc jockey, radio personality and recording artist.  He adopted the nickname "Jazzbo" from a clip-on bowtie and later changed it to the francophile spelling.  He got his start on radio in the 1940s in Salt Lake City and in the 50s, began working occasionally in television, guest-starring as a character actor in several television shows, including "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963).  In 1957, he hosted the "Tonight! America After Dark" show for five weeks between Steve Allen's departure and Jack Paar's arrival.  In the early 1960s, Collins hosted a morning TV program "The Al Collins Show," which aired on San Francisco's KGO-TV.  Collins made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pete in "Sporting Chance" (episode 128).  Collins also had an uncredited role as a party guest in the comedic film "Do Not Disturb" (1965), starring Doris Day.  Over his 50-year career, Collins became friends with many jazz legends, and during the last four decades of his life, he was master of ceremonies at countless jazz festivals.

Booth Colman

Booth Colman is an American stage, film and television actor.  He began his career as a child performer, appearing in local theater productions and radio.  He has made appearances in more than 160 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 60 years.  Colman guest-starred in many of the most popular series since the 1950s, often cast as a venerable professorial character.  Colman attended the Universities of Washington and Michigan, after which he served in the Japanese Language Division of the U.S. Military Intelligence during World War II.  Following his service, Colman began acting on the stage in New York, playing leading roles in over a dozen plays, including repeat performances for more than 15 years playing Ebenezer Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol," Sir Thomas More in "A Man for All Seasons," Commander Queeg in "Caine Mutiny Court Martial," Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman" and many other classic plays.  He eventually made his way to Hollywood to pursue a career in movies, debuting in Howard Hawks' "The Big Sky" (1952) and subsequently appearing in more than 50 feature films.  Colman appeared in a variety of genres, including the comedy "Auntie Mame" (1958), the John Wayne western "The Comancheros" (1961), the Jerry Lewis screwball comedy "The Errand Boy" (1961), three Peter Ustinov comedies, among them "Romanoff and Juliet" (1961), the Fred MacMurray–Polly Bergen comedy "Kisses for My President" (1964), and the labor union drama "Norma Rae" (1979), starring Sally Field in the Oscar-winning title role.

Colman has guest-starred in numerous TV series in virtually every major genre.  Colman made guest appearances in numerous crime dramas, including "Cavalcade of America" (1952–1957), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Police Story" (1973–1977).  He also appeared in the sci-fi classics "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff, and "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965).  He has had a few recurring roles, including his portrayals of Dr. Zaius in "Planet of the Apes" (1974) and Dr. Felix Burke in the long-running soap opera "The Young and the Restless" (1973–present).  More recently, he made appearances in the popular comedy series "My Name is Earl" (2005–2009) and "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody" (2005–2007).

Colman made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeremiah in "The High Country" (episode 122).  He also guest-starred in many other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970)—making several appearances in both, as well as "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Mike Connors

Mike Connors is one of four sons of THE RIFLEMAN's star, Chuck Connors.  He and his three brothers, together with Steven Gardner, son of the show's executive producer Arthur Gardner, appeared in "The Schoolteacher" (episode 86) as schoolchildren.  Mike also appeared with brother Jeff as two boys going fishing in "First Wages" (episode 112).

Steve Connors

Steve Connors is one of four sons of THE RIFLEMAN's star, Chuck Connors.  He and his three brothers, together with Steven Gardner, son of the show's executive producer Arthur Gardner, appeared in "The Schoolteacher" (episode 86) as schoolchildren.

Jeff Connors

Jeff Connors is one of four sons of THE RIFLEMAN's star, Chuck Connors.  He and his three brothers, together with Steven Gardner, son of the show's executive producer Arthur Gardner, appeared in "The Schoolteacher" (episode 86) as schoolchildren.  Jeff also appeared in "Tension" (episode) as Toby Halpern, and with his brother Mike as two boys going fishing in "First Wages" (episode 112).

Kevin Connors

Kevin Connors is one of four sons of THE RIFLEMAN's star, Chuck Connors.  He and his three brothers, together with Steven Gardner, son of the show's executive producer Arthur Gardner, appeared in "The Schoolteacher" (episode 86) as schoolchildren.

Charles Conrad

Charles J. Conrad was an American actor and a politician.  He appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows over 16 years.  Virtually all of his early roles were uncredited.  He made guest appearances in a few popular shows, including "Sergeant Preston of the Yukon" (1955–1958) and the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "The Lawless Years" (1959–1961).  Conrad guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mallory in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49).  He also appeared in the westerns "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Laramie" (1959–1963).  Conrad spent his political career serving in the California State Assembly from 1947 to 1972 and was the Republican minority leader in the late 1960s.

Steve Conte

Steve Conte was an Italian-American actor who worked primarily in television.  He had more than 70 acting credits in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He appeared in various low-budget horror films, including "Teenage Zombies" (1959), "Terror of the Bloodhunters" (1962) and "Face of the Screaming Werewolf" (1964).  Among the numerous television shows in which he guest-starred, Conte appeared in several westerns, sometimes multiple times, including "The Gene Autry Show" (1952–1955), "Death Valley Days" (1955–1957) "Broken Arrow" (1956–1958) and "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959).  Conte made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Doyle Black in "Lariat" (episode 67).

Roberto Contreras

Roberto Contreras was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He acted in a variety of popular shows, including the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Police Story" (1973–1977), as well as the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  Contreras guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Angelo in "The Vaqueros" (episode 111).  He made guest appearances in numerous other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.  Contreras also had a recurring role as Pedro in the western series "The High Chaparral" (1967–1971).

Tommy Cook

Tommy Cook is an American television and film actor who has appeared in 90 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 45 years.  He made his acting debut in the western film "Adventures of Red Ryder" (1940), portraying Little Beaver.  Cook has appeared in various crime dramas, including "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  In addition to television, he has been in a few films, including playing leading roles in the crime dramas "The Viscious Years" (1950) and "Teen-Age Crime Wave" (1955).  Cook also appeared in the noir film "Panic in the Streets" (1950), directed by Elia Kazan.  Cook guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Andy Carr in "Sheer Terror" (episode 113).  He also made guest appearances in other westerns, including "Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951–1958) and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961).

Charles Cooper

Charles Cooper made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode. He played Hank Fulton in "End of a Young Gun" (episode 3), Rudy Crofts in "The Stand-In" (episode 114), Matt Yordy in "Honest Abe" (episode 118), and Larsen, the Bartender in "I Take This Woman" (episode 148).

Ben Cooper

Ben Cooper is an American television and film actor who has appeared in 80 movies and television shows during a 45-year career.  He has been a versatile actor, guest-starring in a variety of genres, including Rod Serling's sci-fi thriller "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow; the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966); starring Raymond Burr, and the Claude Akins comedy series "The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo" (1979–1981), in which he had a recurring role as Waverly.

Cooper has appeared in several films, playing Turkey Ralston in the Joan Crawford western "Johnny Guitar" (1954), and Seaman Jack Hunter in the romantic drama "The Rose Tattoo" (1955), starring Burt Lancaster.  He played the leading character, Harold Norton, in the crime thriller "A Strange Adventure" (1956) and Bill "Kid" Carter in the western "Gun Fight at Comanche Creek" (1963).

Cooper guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Simon Lee in "Face of Yesterday" (episode 95).  He has made guest appearances in numerous other westerns, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).  In 2005, Cooper received the Golden Boot award for his significant contributions to the western genre.

Clancy Cooper

Clancy Cooper was an American stage, television and film actor who appeared in 160 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 35 years.  Many of his film roles were uncredited.  Although primarily appearing in westerns, Cooper also was cast in roles in other genres, including the crime drama "Cavalcade of America" (1952–1957) and the Rod Serling sci-fi thriller series "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  Cooper guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Caleich in "The Raid" (episode 37).  He made guest appearances in virtually every major western of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957); "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959); "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975); "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Lawman" (1958–1962), in which he had a recurring role as Timmo McQueen; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Roger Moore; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Ellen Corby

Ellen Corby, born Ellen Hansen, was a prolific American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 230 movies and television shows during a career spanning 65 years.  Corby was interested in acting beginning in high school, eventually moving to Hollywood, where she took acting lessons for more than a decade.  After playing many uncredited roles, Corby eventually became a busy character actress, appearing in movies and television shows in every genre.  She was cast in the starring role as Emma Barber in the crime drama "Caged" (1950); she played Mrs. Liz Torrey in the Oscar-winning George Stevens' western "Shane" (1953); she portrayed Miss McCardle in the romantic comedy "Sabrina" (1954), starring Humphry Bogart and Audrey Hepburn; and she played the role of the manager of the McKittrick Hotel in the Alfred Hitchcock classic film "Vertigo" (1958).

Corby appeared in many TV series, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), as well as family comedies, including "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), and even "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West.  She is perhaps best-remembered for her portrayal of Grandma Esther Walton in the family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), for which she received several awards, including three Emmy awards for Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series and two Golden Globes for Best Supporting Actress in Television.  Corby was also awarded a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Aunt Trina in the film "I Remember Mama" (1948).

Corby also guest-starred in virtually all of the iconic westerns, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Trackdown" (1957–1959), in which she had a recurring role as Henrietta Porter, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), in which she made two appearances as Aunt Em, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).  Corby guest-starred in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Avery in "The Spoiler" (episode 61) and Mrs. Morgan in "The High Country" (episode 122).  In 1989, Corby receive the Golden Boot award for her significant contributions to the western genre.

Robert Cornthwaite

Robert Cornthwaite was a prolific American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 160 movies and television shows during his 55-year career.  Cornthwaite became interested in acting after being forced to recite a line for a school production.  He attended Long Beach City College and served as an intelligence officer in the Army Air Force during World War II.  Following his military service, Cornthwaite earned a degree from the University of Southern California, after which he then moved to Hollywood, where he finally began pursuing his dream of becoming an actor.  Despite a somewhat slow start, Cornthwaite was eventually working regularly, type-cast as intellectual characters in movies and television shows until his death in 2006.  He was a highly versatile actor, appearing in crime dramas, including "Cavalcade of America" (1952–1957); "The Untouchables" (1959–1963); "Perry Mason" (1957–1966); "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996); as well as the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), hosted by Boris Karloff; Rod Serling's sci-fi thriller series, "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968); the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow; and the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen.  Cornthwaite also had a few recurring roles, especially toward the end of his career, including the part of Professor Windish in the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965), Allan A. Dale in "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West, Judge Edward P. Langdon in the night-time soap "Dynasty" (1981–1989), Hives in the long-running comedy series "Cheers" (1982–1993) and Howard Buss in the drama "Picket Fences" (1992–1996).

Cornthwaite's roles playing intellectual characters followed him from TV to fims, including a several science fiction movies.  He portrayed Dr. Arthur Carrington in "The Thing from Another World" (1951), starring James Arness from "Gunsmoke" ; Dr. Zoldeck in the comedy sci-fi "Monkey Business" (1952), starring Marilyn Monroe; Dr. Pryor in the sci-fi classic "The War of the Worlds" (1953); and Dr. Shelby in the Oscar-winning thriller "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" (1962), starring Joan Crawford and Bette Davis.

Cornthwaite guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Major Dammler in "The Deserter" (episode 65).  Cornthwaite made guest appearances in numerous other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Roger Moore, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Jerome Courtland

Jerome Courtland is an American actor, producer and director.  Between 1944 and 1993 Courtland was involved in the making of more than 70 titles for film and television.  Courtland made one appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, playing Johnny Gibbs in "The Brother-in-Law" (episode 5).

Kay Cousins

Kay Cousins Johnson, born Kay Levy, was an American actress who worked primarily in television.  Over a little more than a decade, Cousins guest-starred in 11 movies and television shows.  She made appearances in a few popular shows, including the comedy "Private Secretary" (1953–1957), starring Ann Sothern; the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), starring Lee Marvin; Rod Serling's iconic sci-fi thriller series, "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); and the spy genre meets western "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), starring Robert Conrad and Ross Martin.  Cousins may be best-known for her marriage to the actor Russell Johnson, who played the professor in Gilligan's Island.  Cousins made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Flo in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).

John Craig

John Craig, born Joseph Cline, Jr., is an American stage, film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 20 movies and television shows in a career spanning two decades.  Among his notable credits, Craig guest-starred in an episode of the immensely popular family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).  Craig made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bo Jackman in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Carolyn Craig

Carolyn Craig, born Adele Ruth Crago, was an American film and television actress whose promising career was tragically cut short following a fatal gunshot wound in 1970.  Although her career lasted just a little over a decade, she appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows.  She was a versatile actress, guest-starring in crime dramas, including "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr; "M Squad" (1957–1960), starring Lee Marvin; and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.; as well as the long-running daytime drama "General Hospital" (beg. 1963).  Craig made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ann Bard in "End of a Young Gun" (episode 3).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961) and "Laramie" (1959–1963).

Robert Crawford

Robert Crawford is an American film and television actor who has appeared in two dozen movies and television shows in a little more than a decade.  He has often been credited as "Bobby" Crawford.  A fairly versatile actor, Crawford has made guest appearances in the Disney family adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), starring Guy Williams; the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb; and the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow.  He also played a few recurring roles, including Andy Sherman in the western "Laramie" (1959–1963) and Detective Phil Burns in the crime drama "Manhunt" (1959–1961).  Crawford guest-starred in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a schoolboy in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6), Bobby in "The Gaucho" (episode 14) and Freddy Toomey in "The Second Witness" (episode 23).  He also made guest appearances in the westerns "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Dennis Cross

Dennis Cross made six appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Witcherly in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8), Ned Dunnell in "The Gaucho," (episode 14), Lafe Oberly in "The Patsy" (episode 41), Dorn in "The Hero" (episode 59), Fance Degnan in "The Vision" (episode 66), and Martin in "The Quiet Fear" (episode 127). Cross studied acting on the G. I. bill at the Actors Lab in Hollywood. He later moved to New York, where he appeared in live television programas and commercials. He appeared in the Philco Television Playhouse show, "A Trip To Bountiful," appearing with Lillian Gish, icon of the silent film era.

Robert Culp

Robert Culp was an American actor, screenwriter and director who had a prolific career spanning six decades.  He also performed voice work.  He began his career with the TV western "Trackdown" (1957–1959), in which he played Texas Ranger Hoby Gilman.  His best-remembered film role was one of the title characters in the 1969 feature "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice," but he was better known for his work in television, especially for his roles portraying Kelly Robinson in the espionage adventure series "I Spy" (1965–1968) co-starring Bill Cosby; FBI agent Bill Maxwell in "The Greatest American Hero" (1981–1986); and Warren, Debra's father, in "Everybody Loves Raymond" (1996–2004).  Culp appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colly Vane in "Hero" (episode 59) and North Fork town hero Dave Foley in "The Man from Salinas" (episode 130).  Culp also wrote two RIFLEMAN episodes, "Waste, Parts I and II" (episodes 143 and 144).

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Jeff Daley

Jeff Daley, born James William Daley, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nine movies and television shows in three years.  He guest-starred in a few shows, including the mystery series "Mike Hammer" (1956–1959) and the detective drama "Surfside 6" (1960–1962).  Daley made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam in "Eddie's Daughter" (episode 46).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne, and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen.

Maurice Dallimore

Maurice Dallimore was an English film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows during his 35-year career.  He was a versatile actor, guest-starring in shows as varied as the action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges; the horror meets crime drama series, "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff; the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.; Rod Serling's sci-fi anthology series "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); the comic book adventure show "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West; and the family comedy "Bewitched" (1964–1972), starring Elizabeth Montgomery.  He also had a recurring role playing Willie Shorthouse in the short-lived comedy series "Fair Exchange" (1962–1963).  Dallimore made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Percy Bullock, Sr., in "Hostage to a Fortune" (episode 160).

Abby Dalton

Abby Dalton, born Marlene Wasden, is an American actress who spent most of her 50-year career working in television.  She has nearly 50 acting credits and was most prolific in the 1960s, when she appeared in many TV shows and is best-remembered for several shows in which she had a recurring role, including Martha Hale in "Hennesey" (1959–1962), Joey Bishop's wife, Ellie Barnes, in "The Joey Bishop Show" (1961–1965) and later in her career, Julia Cumson in the drama series "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990).  Dalton also was a regular panelist on the game shows, "Match Game" (1962–1969) and "Hollywood Squares" (intermittently aired from 1966–1984).   Dalton made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nancy Moore in "The Marshall" (episode 4).

Linda Dangcil

Linda Dangcil was an American stage, film and television actress, as well as a dancer.  She appeared in nearly 40 movies and television shows during her 50-year career.  When she was a teenager, she broke into show business on Broadway, performing in "Peter Pan" (1954) opposite Mary Martin and was later tapped by Jerome Robbins to be one of the principal dancers in the film adaptation of "West Side Story" (1961).  Dangcil also performed in several roles in the First National Tour of "A Chorus Line" at the Shubert Theater in Los Angeles.  Her best-remembered role was probably Sister Ana in the Sally Fields comedy "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970).  Dangcil made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Sanchez in "Baranca" (episode 82).  She also guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1992), starring James Garner, and "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962).

Royal Dano

Royal Dano was an American actor whose career in film and television spanned four decades.  Born in New York, he purportedly ran away from home at the age of 12 and ever restless, lived in various places ranging from the east to west coast, including Florida, Texas and California.  Eventually, he made an agreement with his father to continue his education on the condition he would still have the freedom to travel.  Eventually, Dano attended New York University.  His performing career began as part of the 44th Special Service Provisional Company during World War II.  He soon branched out to the New York stage and made his Broadway debut with a small role in the hit musical "Finian's Rainbow."  Dano was nominated by the New York Critic's Circle as one of the Promising Actors of 1949.

Tall and lean with gaunt features, a thatch of dark hair, a rangy build and a distinctive deep croaky voice, Dano usually was cast both in movies and television shows as gloomy or sinister characters. &nsp;He appeared most often in westerns and worked several times with James Stewart and director Anthony Mann.  He made his film debut in "Undercover Girl" (1950).  Among his best-remembered supporting roles in the western genre were film appearances as a sickly bookworm bad guy in "Johnny Guitar," (1954), a cattle rustler in "The Culpepper Cattle Company" (1972), and Ten Spot in "The Outlaw Josey Wales" (1976).  He also made numerous television appearances, including the western series, "Gunsmoke," "Bonanza," "Wagon Train," "The Virginian," and "Little House on the Prairie," among many others.  Dano also had memorable roles as Elijah in "Moby Dick" (1956) and President Abraham Lincoln, whom he portrayed several times in his career, including in the "Honest Abe" episode of THE RIFLEMAN.  Dano made five guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode, including Frank Blandon in "The Sheridan Story" (episode 16), Jonas Epps in "A Matter of Faith" (episode 34), Aaron Wingate in "A Case of Identity" (episode 57), Abe in "Honest Abe" (episode 118), and Jamison in "Day of Reckoning" (episode 138).

Dano continued to work in film and television until his death at age 71, in 1994.  Some of his later work in television included guest spots in "Ben Casey," "Lost in Space," "Night Gallery," "Route 66," "Planet of the Apes," "Cannon," "Little House on the Prairie," "Kung Fu," "CHIPs," "Quincy M.E.," "Fantasy Island," "Twin Peaks," "Amazing Stories."  Among his more memorable later roles in films were his portrayals as a coroner in "Electra Glide in Blue" (1973), a profanity-spewing preacher in "Big Bad Mama" (1974), a minister in "The Right Stuff" (1983), a stuffy high school teacher in "Teachers" (1984), rascally zombified old-timer Gramps in "House II: The Second Story" (1987), a cantankerous farmer in "Killer Klowns from Outer Space" (1988), and in his last role, a cemetery caretaker in George Romero's "The Dark Half" (1993).

Cesare Danova

Cesare Danova, born Cesare Deitinger in Bergamo, Italy, was a television and screen actor whose career spanned nearly five decades.  Tall, handsome and possessed of an aristocratic air, he adopted the stage name Danova when he turned to acting in Rome at the end of World War II.  After appearing in more than 20 films in Europe, he was signed to a long-term contract by MGM.

Originally groomed for the lead role in "Ben Hur" (1959), director William Wyler instead tapped Charleton Heston for the part, whose performance garnered the Oscar for Best Actor in a Leading Role.  Danova's next big break came when he was cast in "Cleopatra" (1963).  The following year he starred in "Viva Las Vegas" as Elvis Presley's rival for both Ann Margaret's Rusty Martin and for the Las Vegas Grand Prix.

Two of his best film roles came later in Danova's career, first in 1973, playing the neighborhood Mafia Don, Giovanni Cappa, in Martian Scorsese's "Mean Streets" and in 1978, playing the corrupt town mayor, Carmine DePasto, in "National Lampoon's Animal House."

Danova also appeared in numerous television shows throughout his career.  He co-starred in the Golden-Globe nominated TV series, "Garrison's Guerillas" (1967–1968), which was inspired by the film, "The Dirty Dozen."  When Danova first came to America, he reportedly said he wanted to lose his accent so that he could play an American cowboy.  In 1958, he got his wish, debuting on American television in THE RIFLEMAN.  He portrayed Count DiMontova in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7) and made two additional appearances, playing the title role in "Baranca" (episode 82) and Mario Rosati in "The Guest" (episode 165).

Christopher Dark

Christopher Dark, born Alfred Francis DeLeo, was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in 115 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 20 years.  He appeared primarily in westerns and crime dramas, including "Cavalcade of America" (1952–1957); the short-lived series "Code 3" (1957), in which he had a recurring role as Sgt. Zevala; "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen; the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr; "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964); and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack.  He also appeared in the action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1959–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges; the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow; and "The Green Hornet" (1966–1967), starring Bruce Lee as Kato.

Dark made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Malakie in "Bloodlines" (episode 42).  He also guest-starred in many of the other major westerns, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954); "The Long Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

Steven Darrell

Steven Darrell, born Darryl Eugene Horsfall, was a prolific American film and television actor who appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 30 years.  Most of his filmography is in westerns; although, he guest-starred in a few TV shows in other genres, notably the gothic horror crime series hosted by Boris Karloff, "Thriller" (1960–1962).  Darrell made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Russell in "Obituary" (episode 44) and Eli Benson in "Dead Cold Cash" (episode 85).

In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Darrell guest-starred in virtually all of the popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1956); "The Adventures of Wild Bill Hicock" (1951–1958), starring Guy Madison and Andy Devine; "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957); starring Clayton Moore, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brien; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  Darrell also had a recurring role as Sheriff Hal Humphrey in "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962).

Sammy Davis, Jr.

Sammy Davis, Jr. was an American entertainer who began performing at the age of three with his father and uncle in the vaudeville group, the Will Mastin Trio.  Although regarded as a legendary singer and dancer, Davis appeared in more than 60 television shows and movies in a career spanning six decades.  His association with the "Rat Pack," a group of actor/performers famously led by Davis, Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, became the stuff of Hollywood legend, and various members appeared together sporadically in films from the late 1940s through the mid-1980s, notably "Ocean's Eleven" (1960).  Davis was nominated for numerous awards in his lifetime, including a Tony award nomination for Best actor in the Broadway musical, "Golden Boy" (1964–1966).  He also received many awards and honorifics, including the NAACP's Spingarn Medal (1968) and the NAACP Image Award (1989). He was a Kennedy Center Honoree in 1987, and was awarded posthumously the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award (2001) and the Grammy Hall of Fame Award (2002).

Davis made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tip Corey in "Two Ounces of Tin" (episode 131), and Wade Randall in "The Most Amazing Man" (episode 151).  He guest-starred in "Lawman" (1958–1962), made a cameo appearance in "The Patty Duke Show" (1965), and also made episodic appearances in some of television's most iconic shows, including "Ben Casey" (1963), "I Dream of Jeannie" (1967), "All in the Family" (1972) and "The Cosby Show" (1989).

Maureen Dawson

Maureen Dawson was an American actress who primarily worked in television.  She appeared in 15 movies and television shows in 15 years.  In her brief career, Dawson guest-starred in quite a variety of shows, including the action-adventure series "Burke's Law" (1963–1966), starring Gene Barry; the war comedy, "McHale's Navy" (1962–1966), starring Ernest Borgnine; the espionage series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum; the crime drama "Honey West" (1965–1966), starring Anne Francis; and Buck Henry's spy spoof series, "Get Smart" (1965–1970), starring Don Adams and Barbara Feldman.  Dawson made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Molly Carpenter in "Quiet Night, Deadly Night" (episode 146).  She also guest-starred in an episode of the western series "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner.

Hal K. Dawson

Hal K. Dawson was an American actor whose career spanned almost 50 years.  He appeared in more than 250 films and television shows, playing mostly uncredited or small roles.  While appearing in the stage production of "Machinal," which opened on Broadway in 1928, he roomed with Clark Gable, who played the leading role.  Later, when Gable's career flourished, he recommended Dawson for many parts, includinng roles in "Libeled Lady" (1936) and "To Please a Lady" (1950).  Other film credits include "Easy Livin" (1937), "The Great Victor Herbert" (1939), "Song of the Island" (1942), "The Captive City" (1952), "The Glenn Miller Story" (1954), "The Country Girl" (1954), "The Girl Rush" (1955), "Three For the Show" (1955), "Foxfire" (1955), "The Tin Star" (1957), "Loving You" (1957),"The Last Hurrah" (1958), "Cattle Empire" (1958), "Face of a Fugitive" (1959), "The Rat Race" (1960).

Dawson appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, "Six Days and A Year" (episode 91).  He portrayed Harley Hannabury, a recurring character played by Ian Murray in six other episodes.  Dawson made appearances on many television shows throughout the 1950's, 60's and 70's.

Dawson was a lifelong member of the Masquers Club, and later in life was made an honorary member of the Pioneers of Radio Club.  He made his last television appearance in "What's Happening!!" in 1979 and passed away in 1987.

Ted de Corsia

Ted de Corsia was an American radio, television and film actor.  Over the course of a career spanning 25 years, Corsia garnered nearly 200 credits as an actor.  He is often remembered for his role as a gangster in "The Enforcer" (1951).  Indeed, the role typifies much of Corsia's acting career, in which he was typecast as a villain and, more often than not, a gangster.

De Corsia spent many of his early years working in the film industry.  He made his debut in Orson Welles' "The Lady from Shanghai" (1947).  Around this time, Corsia also acted in "The Naked City (1948), "The Big Combo" (1955), "The Killing" (1956), "Slightly Scarlet" (1956) and "Baby Face Nelson" (1957), consistently reprising his role as the villain.

DeCorsia made one appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Norv Waggoner in "Young Englishman" (episode 13).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Corsia also made appearances on "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Tales of the Texas Rangers" (1955–1959) and "Lawman" (1958–1962).

Richard Deacon

Richard Deacon was an American character actor of television and film.  He appeared in more than 150 TV shows and movies during a career spanning 30 years.  Tall, bald-headed and bespectacled, he tended to be cast in roles portraying humorless or imperious authority figures.  Many of his early parts were uncredited.  He had his first recurring role as Sherman Hall in "The Charles Farrell Show" (1956).  In the 1960s, Deacon became a familiar presence in television, playing various recurring roles, including Fred Rutherford in "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and Mel Cooley in "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966), the role for which he may be most beloved and best-remembered.  In addition to his career as an actor, Deacon was also a renowned gourmet chef.  He authored a series of cook books and hosted a television series.  Deacon made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colonel Simms in "The Hangman" (episode 76).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Deacon also appeared in two other iconic westerns, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Edgar Dearing

Edgar Dearing was a prolific American film and television actor who spent much of his career typecast as a motorcycle cop.  He began acting during the silent era, appearing in more than 330 movies and television shows during his 40-year career.  Many of his roles were uncredited.  Dearing is perhaps most fondly remembered for his portrayal of a motorcycle policeman in the Laurel and Hardy film "Two Tars" (1928), but he also guest-starred in many television shows, including "Thriller" (1960–1962), the crime drama meets gothic horror series hosted by Boris Karloff, and Rod Serling's sci-fi anthology series, "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), as well as the westerns "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1956) and "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962).  Dearing made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the justice of the peace in "Shivaree" (episode 19).

Gloria DeHaven

Gloria DeHaven, born Gloria Mildred DeHaven, is an American stage, film and television actress who began acting as a child.  She has appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 60 years.  She has guest-starred in a wide variety of popular TV shows, including the quirky comedy "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman" (1976–1978), starring Louise Lasser; the crime drama "Police Story" (1973–1977), Aaron Spelling's "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), starring Ricardo Montalban; the action-adventure series "Hart to Hart" (1979–1984), starring Robert Wagner and Stefanie Powers as a husband-and-wife detective duo; and the whodunit series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), starring Angela Lansbury.  DeHaven also had a recurring role in the short-lived crime drama "Nakia" (1974), portraying Irene James.  More recently, she has guest-starred in several nighttime soap operas, including "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990), starring Jane Wyman; and the daytime drama "Ryan's Hope" (1975–1989), in which she had a recurring role as Bess Shelby.  In 1960, DeHaven received a Star on the Walk of Fame.

DeHaven made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lillian Halstead in "Eddie's Daughter" (episode 46).  She also guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntire, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

John Dehner

John Dehner was an American actor of radio, film and television.  In a career spanning nearly 50 years he appeared in more than 260 movies and television shows.  Often cast as villains, he was tall and distinguished and lent an urbane and droll personae to the characters he played.  Dehner made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode, including Tom King in "The Money Gun" (episode 33), Al Walker in "The Blowout" (episode 43), Wood Bartell in "The Baby Sitter" (episode 52), and Major Aaron King in "The Prisoner" (episode 101).

Frank DeKova

Frank Dekova was an Italian-American stage, film and television actor.  Originally a teacher, Dekova joined a Shakespearean repertory group and was eventually discovered by the legendary film director Elia Kazan.  He appeared in nearly 140 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  Dekova guest-starred in various popular TV shows, including the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), starring Martin Milner; the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack; the frontier farce starring Forrest Tucker and Larry Storch, "F Troop" (1965–1967), in which he had a recurring role as Chief Wild Eagle; and the iconic western family drama starring Melissa Gilbert, "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).

Dekova made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Chief Hostay in "The Indian" (episode 21) and Carl Miller in "Meeting at Midnight" (episode 74).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, almost always playing the role of a Native American chieftan.  He appeared in "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), in which he had a recurring role as Tobeel; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner; and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker.

Galvan DeLeon

Galvan DeLeon guest-starred in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a guitar player in "New Orleans Menace" (episode 10).  He also had a minor part in the Oscar-winning musical war romance "South Pacific" (1958), starring Rossano Brazzi and Mitzi Gaynor.

Lincoln Demyan

Lincoln Demyan, born George Lincoln Demyan, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows in a little over a decade.  He guest-starred in a number of iconic TV shows, including the popular fantasy comedy "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), starring Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman and Bill Daly; Gene Roddenberry's outer space classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), starring William Shatner and Leonard Nemoy; and the action-adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine as a Shaolin Monk roaming the Old West.  Demyan made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Kelly Banner in "The Lonesome Bride" (episode 108).  It was his first television appearance.  Demyan guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN'S own Chuck Connors; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Pernell Roberts, Dan Blocker and Micahel Landon; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

George DeNormand

George DeNormand was an American stuntman and actor.  Between his stunt work and his acting credits, DeNormand appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows during a career spanning 45 years.  He provided stunt work for several films, including the horror B-movie "Werewolf of London" (1935), starring Henry Hull and Warner Oland; the drama "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" (1939), starring Charles Laughton and Maureen O'Hara; and the adventure comedy "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" (1963), starring an all-star ensemble cast.  He also appeared in several films as an actor, including playing minor parts in the mystery drama "Citizen Kane" (1941), starring Orson Welles and Joseph Cotton; the drama "A Raisin in the Sun" (1961), starring Sidney Poitier; and the superhero parody "Batman" (1966), starring Adam West and Burt Ward.  He guest-starred in a variety of television shows, including the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).

In addition to his many appearances as a stuntman, DeNormand made two appearances as an actor in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a townsman in "The Photographer" (episode 18) and "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Richard Devon

Richard Devon made seven guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode. He played Jethroe in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35), Austin Stark in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49), Walt Ryerson in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63), Jack Adams in "Miss Milly" (episode 84), Ben Macowan in "The Silent Knife" (episode 89), Gus Potter in "The Stand-In" (episode 114), and Lovett, the Gunslinger, in "The Most Amazing Man" (episode 151).

John Dierkes

John Dierkes was an American actor who appeared in numerous films and television shows in a career spanning 25 years.  Previously, he worked in the United States Department of State and later joined the Red Cross, serving in Great Britain during World War II, where he met film Director, John Huston, who encouraged him to become an actor.  After the war, however, he returned to government work, but eventually his employer, this time the US Treasury Department, sent him to Hollywood to be a technical consultant on the 1948 film, "The Day the Earth Stood Still."  In the same year, Orson Welles cast him in his adaptation of Shakespeare's "Macbeth."  Dierkes returned to his Treasury Department job, but John Huston coaxed him back to Hollywood to appear in his film, "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951).  Among his numerous film credits, Dierkes portrayed Morgan Ryker in the western classic "Shane" (1053); and he appeared in the Yul Brynner film, "The Buccaneer" (1958);the film adaptation of Gore Vidal's "The Left Handed Gun" (1958), starring Paul Newman; "The Hanging Tree" (1959), starring Gary Cooper; John Wayne's "The Alamo" (1960); and "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring George C. Scott and Faye Dunaway.

Dierkes made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the semi-regular character, Nels Svenson (variously Swenson, Swensen).  One of seven actors to play the role of the blacksmith, he appeared in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7) and "The Sister" (episode 9).  Dierkes appeared in many other television shows, including numerous Westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1955), "Wagon Train" (1957–1959), "Bonanza" (1959), "Peter Gunn" (1961), "Rawhide" (1962–1964) and "Gunsmoke" (1956–1973).

Robert Dix

Robert Dix, born Robert Warren Brimmer, is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 20 years.   Dix has appeared in in many films, including in the sci-fi film classic starring Walter Pidgeon and Anne Francis, "Forbidden Planet" (1956), in which he played Crewman Grey; the western drama starring Barbara Stanwyck, "Forty Guns" (1957), in which he played Chico Bonnell; the pulp sci-fi horror film "Horror of the Blood Monsters" (1970), in which he had a starring role with John Carradine; and the western "Five Bloody Graves" (1970), in which he portrayed Ben Thompson.

Dix guest-starred in one episode of the crime drama "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, and he made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Davy Clay in "The Raid" (episode 37).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Lawrence Dobkin

Lawrence Dobkin was an American television director, actor and television screenwriter whose career spanned seven decades.  Dobkin was a prolific performer during the Golden Age of Radio. His voice was use to narrate the classic western "Broken Arrow" and "The Robe."  Dobkin made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Juan Argentez in "The Gaucho" (episode 14), General Phil Sheridan in The Sheridan Story" (episode 16), Don Chimera del Laredo in "The Knight Errant" (episode 117), and Ben Judson in "The Day a Town Slept" (episode 139).  Dobkin worked behind the camera on THE RIFLEMAN, with writing credits for "The Actress" (episode 94) and "The Executioner" (episode 142).  He also directed several episodes, including "Tinhorn" (episode 134), "The Jealous Man" (episode 136), "Day of Reckoning" (episode 138), and "The Executioner" (episode 142).  Dobkin later directed several episodes of the Chuck Connors television series "Branded" (1965-1966).  Dobkin's film performances include "Never Fear," "Sweet Smell of Success," and "North by Northwest,"  He announced the landmark television series "Naked City," closing each episode with the statement, "There are eight million stories in the naked city, and this has been one of them."

Molly Dodd

Molly Dodd was an American actress who primarily worked in television.  She appeared in 40 movies and televisions shows in a career spanning more than 20 years.  She guest-starred in numerous popular shows, including the crime drama, "M Squad" (1957–1960), starring Lee Marvin as Lieutenant Frank Ballinger; Rod Serling's sci-fi anthology series, "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); and the award-winning family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), with an ensemble cast of veteran actors, including Will Geer, Ellen Corby, Ralph Waite and Michael Learned, and newcomers, notably Richard Thomas.  Dodd also appeared in the family comedies "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), "Bewitched" (1964–1972) and "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974).  Dodd made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bessie Steel Weaver in "The Jailbird" (episode 73).

James Drury

James Drury is an American actor in television and film.  He has nearly 70 acting credits in a career spanning 50 years.  Frequently cast in westerns, in 1991, he was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City.  Among his more illustrious film credits, Drury appeared in the Sam Peckinpah western, "Ride the High Country" (1962).  Drury had his first major role in the western series "The Virginian" (1962–1971), portraying the title character. In 2000, he reprised the role in a TV movie homage, "The Virginian," to the 1960s series.

Drury made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the role of Lloyd Carpenter in "The Marshal" (episode 4) and Spicer in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Drury also appeared in other iconic westerns of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, including "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

Don Drysdale

Don Drysdale, born Donald Scott Drysdale, was a right-handed Major League Baseball pitcher who played for both the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers. Like Chuck Connors, prior to his MLB career, he played basketball, Drysdale at UCLA, and Connors for the Boston Celtics.  In his post-baseball career, he was a radio broadcaster, and later, in 1984, was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.  Drsydale also had a career as an actor, appearing in 12 movies and television shows over a period of nearly 40 years.  Among the TV shows in which he guest-starred, were the variety shows "The Red Skeleton Hour" (1951–1971) and "The Joey Bishop Show" (1961–1965), as well the adventure series "Cowboy in Africa" (1967–1968), starring Chuck Connors.  Connors and Drysdale made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Warren in "Skull" (episode 124).

Don Dubbins

Don Dubbins, born Donald George Dubbins, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He guest-starred in numerous popular shows, including the anthology horror series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962); the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), starring Lee Marvin as Lieutenant Frank Ballinger; Rod Serling's sci-fi anthology series "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964); the crime "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efren Zimbalist, Jr.; the courtroom crime drama starring Raymond Burr ; the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen as a wrongly convicted doctor on the run.  Dubbins also crossed over into comedy, appearing int the popular fantasy sitcom "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), starring Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman and Bill Daly; the action-adventure western "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine as a Shaolin monk; Aaron Spelling's "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), starring Ricardo Montalban as Mr. Roarke; the family western drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), starring Melissa Gilbert as Laura Ingalls; and the whodunit mystery series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), starring Angela Lansbury as Jessica Fletcher.

Dubbins appeared in several films, including the western "Tribute to a Bad Man" (1956), in which he had a starring role alongside James Cagney; the drama "The D.I." (1957), in which he had a starring role as Private Owens; the crime drama "The Prize" (1963), in which he portrayed Ivar Cramer and starred Paul Newman as Andrew Craig; and the classic sci-fi film based on the book of the same name by Ray Bradbury, "The Illustrated Man" (1969), in which he played the role of Pickard and starred Rod Steiger.

Dubbins made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Perry in "The Martinet" (episode 83).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

John Durren

John Durren is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He has guest-starred in many of the popular shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the courtroom crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr; the family comedy "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), starring Jay North in the title role; the action-adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen as a wrongly convicted doctor on the run; the detective drama "Kojak" (1973–1978), starring Telly Savalas in the title role; the war satire "M*A*S*H*" (1972–1983), starring an ensemble cast led by Alan Alda, Wayne Rogers, Loretta Swit, Larry Linville, Harry Morgan and MacLean Stevenson; and the action-adventure series "The New Adventures of Wonder Woman" (1975–1979), starring Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman.  Durren made his first television appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Davey Pardee in "The Challenge" (episode 28) and Stump Malakie in "Bloodlines" (episode 42).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker.

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Chana Eden

Chana Eden, born Chana Mesyngier, is an Israeli television and film actress.  She has appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 30 years.  She has guest-starred in several popular crime dramas, including "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr as an ace attorney, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Naked City" (1958–1963).  Eden made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nita Argentez in "The Gaucho" (episode 14).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry as William Barclay "Bat" Masterson, "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen as Josh Randall.

Barbara Eiler

Barbara Eiler was an American actress who primarily worked in television.  She appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning 15 years.  She began acting in radio as a teenager, starring in "The Life of Riley" and "The Dennis Day Show."  She garnered a few film roles, including the World War II drama "The Deep Six" (1959), starring Alan Ladd, and the sci-fi thriller "The Bubble" (1966), starring Michael Cole (star of the hit series "The Mod Squad").  Eiler guest-starred in the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb as Sgt. Joe Friday, "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen as a suave private eye, and "Thriller" (1960–1962), hosted by Boris Karloff, as well as "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), hosted by Walt Disney, and the long-running family comedy "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966).  Eiler made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mary Phillips in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).  She guest-starred in several other popular western series, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wanted" Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Jack Elam

Jack Elam was an American film and television actor whose career spanned more than 40 years.  He grew up in difficult circumstances, moving from the households of relatives and father, stepmother and siblings after his mother passed away.  He attended Santa Monica Junior College in California, then worked as an accountant and later, he briefly was manager of the Bel Air Hotel.  Purportedly, he got his first movie job by trading his accounting services for a role.  His film debut was a role in "She Shoulda Said No!" (1949), an exploitation film about the vices of marijuana.  Elam quickly became one of the most memorable supporting players in Hollywood and became well-known for playing villains in western genre and gangster films.   He played up a near-demented screen persona, which was enhanced by a wandering left eye rendered sightless from a childhood fight.  Although he was a highly recognizable villain throughout most of his acting career, in later years he played more comedic roles, becoming more winsome, if still grizzled and slightly crazed.

Elam made five guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Sim Groder in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7), Gavin Martin in "Tension" (episode 45), Gus Smith in "Shotgun Man" (episode 69), Gates in "The Knight Errant" (episode 117) and Russell, the Pool Shark, in "Shattered Idol" (episode 120).   In 1994, Elam was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.

Robert Ellenstein

Robert Ellenstein was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 45 years.  He was a versatile actor, guest-starring in shows in almost every genre, including numerous crime dramas—"Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack, and "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), starring Angela Lansbury, in addition to the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961).  Ellenstein also appeared in the gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff, the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow as Sgt. Saunders, the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves, the iconic sci-fi series "Star Trek: The Next Generation" (1987–1994), and Michael Crichton's long-running medical drama, "ER" (1994–2009).  Ellenstein also appeared in the one of the films in the Star Trek franchise, "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" (1986), in which he played the role of Federation Council President.

Ellenstein made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bart Jamieson in "The Photographer" (episode 18).  He guest-starred in a number of other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Ross Elliott

Ross Elliott was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 40 years.  Elliott was a remarkably versatile actor, guest-starring in most popular genres, including the classic family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), in addition to the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975) both starring Raymond Burr, "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, as well as "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring George Reeves, the gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff, the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), starring Craig Stevens, the nautical action-adventure series, "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges as an intrepid scuba diver, Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen, the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow as Sgt. Saunders, the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves, and the classic family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), directed by Michael Landon and starring Melissa Gilbert.

Elliott made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Johnson in "Gunfire" (episode 126).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in virtually all of the other major westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Frank McGrath, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker and Michael Landon, and also "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Dick Elliott

Dick Elliott, born Richard Damon Elliott, was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 350 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  Many of his roles were uncredited.  He guest-starred in various popular shows, including the iconic family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), in which he had a recurring role as Mayor Pike, in addition to "The Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring George Reeves.  Elliott made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hardiman, the apple guy, in "Day of the Hunter" (episode 55).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Donald Elson

Donald Elson is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 50 years.  He has guest-starred in various popular shows, including the gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff, the campy take on the comic book hero "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West, the crime drama "Ironside" (1967–1975), starring Raymond Burr as a wheelchair-bound detective, the classic family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), starring Melissa Gilbert and Michael Landon, who also directed, and the tongue-in-cheek whodunit "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), starring Angela Lansbury.  Elson made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the printer in "The Coward" (episode 53), and Aaron the liveryman in "Outlaw's Shows" (episode 141).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, and also "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Beverly Ann Englander

Leif Erickson

Leif Erickson was an American film and television actor.  Born as William Wycliffe Anderson, he appeared in numerous films and television series.   Erickson appeared in THE RIFLEMAN pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter," as Big Jim Lewis.  He later went on to star in his own TV Western, playing patriach Big John Cannon in "High Chaparral."  He and Chuck Connors also appeared together in "Branded."  Previously, the two actors co-starred with John Wayne in "Trouble Along the Way."   His film credits include "College Holiday," "Conquest," "Ride a Crooked Mile," "Sorry Wrong Number," "The Snake Pit," "Fourteen Hours," "Invaders from Mars," "On the Waterfront," "Twilight for the Gods," "A Gathering of Eagles," "Roustabout," and "The Carpetbaggers."  Perhaps his most notable role was playing Deborah Kerr's macho husband in the stage and film versions of "Tea and Sympathy."

Bill Erwin

Bill Erwin, born William Lindsey Erwin, was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows over the course of his 65-year career.  He was a remarkably versatile actor, guest-starring in shows in virtually all of the major genres, including the classic family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), in addition to the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr as an ace attorney.  Erwin also appeared in the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges as an intrepid scuba diver, Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure series starring "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), David Janssen as a doctor wrongfully convicted of murder, and also more recent sitcoms, including "Seinfeld" (1990–1998), "The Drew Carey Show" (1995–2004), and "The King Of Queens" (1998–2007).

Erwin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe Flecker in "The Pet" (episode 15).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Erwin guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire as the wagon master, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Richard Evans

Richard Evans is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  He has guest-starred in various popular shows, including the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges, the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen, the prime-time soap opera "Peyton Place" (1964–1969), in which he had a recurring role as Paul Hanley.  Evans also appeared in the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and the sci-fi classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), starring William Shatner.

Evans made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Shep Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), and Bruce Henry in "A Young Man's Fancy" (episode 129).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Evans guest-starred in a number of other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

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Hampton Fancher

Hampton Fancher is an American film and television actor, in addition to being a screenwriter and producer.  Born in East Los Angeles and raised in a mixed culture family, he ran away to Spain at age 15 and became a flamenco dancer.  By age 20 he returned to embark on a 50-career in the entertainment industry, appearing in nearly 50 movies and television shows and working behind the camera as a screenwriter, producer and director.  Most of his acting roles in television were in westerns and crime dramas, including "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen, "Adam-12" (1968–1975), starring Martin Milner and Kent McCord, "The Blue Knight" (1975–1976), starring George Kennedy, and "Police Story" (1973–1977), starring Scott Brady, Mel Scott and Don Meredith.  Fancher has credits as screenwriter and executive producer for Ridley Scott's iconic sci-fi film "Blade Runner" (1982), starring Harrison Ford, screenwriter for "The Mighty Quinn" (1989), starring Denzel Washington, and both screenwriter and director for "The Minus Man" (1999), starring Owen Wilson.

Fancher made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Corey Hazlitt in "The Decision" (episode 116).  He has guest-starred in many popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Annie Fargue

Born Annie Goldfarb in pre-World War II France, Annie Fargue (also Farge) was a television and film actress.  She appeared in nearly 20 French and English language movies and television shows in a brief career of 14 years, before returning home to France in the mid-1960s where she became a theatrical director.  In television, she was cast in the title role of the short-lived sitcom "Angel" (1960–1961), co-starring Marshall Thompson.  She guest-starred in several popular series, including the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and James Michener's "Adventures in Paradise" (1959–1962), starring Gardner McKay, James Holden and Guy Stockwell.  Fargue made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jennifer in "The Princess" (episode 125).   Behind the camera, she was associate producer of the John Huston film "Victory" (1981), starring Michael Caine, Sylvester Stallone and Pelé, and executive producer of the sci-fi short film "Chip" (2011), starring Joe Amato.

Lee Farr

Lee Farr was an American actor who primarily worked in television.  During his 20 years as an actor, Farr appeared in a few movies and over 30 television shows, including several episodes of "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Farr made two appearances on THE RIFLEMAN, playing Sam Montgomery in "Home Ranch" (episode 2) and Carl Avery in "A Friend in Need" (episode 123).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Farr also acted in the westerns "Lawman" (1958–1962), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Fats

Fats made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the piano man in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).

William Fawcett

William Fawcett, born William Fawcett Thomas, was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 50 movies and 200 television shows in a career spanning more than 35 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, Fawcett was ordained as a minister, and he obtained a Ph.D. in Elizabethan drama from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, then went on to become the Professor of Theatre at Michigan State University.  In the mid-1940s he embarked on an acting career full-time.  He guest-starred in many popular TV shows, including guest-starring roles in the classic family comedy of the 1950s, "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), starring Jerry Mathers, the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr, the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), starring Craig Stevens, Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen.  Most of Fawcett's film appearances were uncredited bit parts.

Fawcett made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Newman in "Lost Treasure of Canyon Town" (episode 99) and Pyrite Rand in "Suspicion" (episode 157).  Fawcett guest-starred in dozens of other westerns, often appearing multiple times as different characters.  Among the many westerns in which he appeared were "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

Frank Ferguson

Frank Ferguson was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 45 years.  Before embarking on a full-time screen career, he was a performer and director of the Pasadena Community Playhouse, where he coached up-and-coming young actors, including Dana Andrews, George Reeve, Robert Preston and Victor Mature.  Most of his acting assignments in the first 15 years of his career were uncredited roles in films playing dozens of bankers, ranchers, and police detectives.  His biggest screen roles were appearances in "Rancho Notorious" (1952), starring Marlene Dietrich, and "Johnny Guitar" (1954), starring Joan Crawford and Sterling Hayden.  Ferguson guest-starred in many of the most popular TV shows of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, often appearing multiple times in different roles or as a recurring character.  Some of his television credits include appearances in "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring George Reeves, the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, the family comedy series "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), starring Jerry Mathers, and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the action-adventure series, "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine, and the classic family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1964) and "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), starring Melissa Gilbert and Michael Landon, which he also directed.  Ferguson had recurring roles portraying Gus on the children's show "My Friend Flicka" (1955), Eli Carson in "Peyton Place" (1964–1969), and Dr. Barton Stuart in both "Petticoat Junction" (1964–1970) and "Green Acres" (1970).

Ferguson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam Bedford in "The Hero" (episode 59).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in many other popular westerns, making multiple appearances in many of them, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and John McIntire, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon.

Jimmy Fields

Jimmy Fields is an American television and film actor.  He has appeared in 10 movies and television shows during a career spanning just over 10 years.  He had a minor part in the comedy film "Sweet Charity" (1969), starring Shirley MacLaine, and he guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the family comedies "Mister Ed" (1958–1966) and "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1975) and the sci-fi cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969).  He had a recurring role as Richy Gordon in the comedy series "The Ann Southern Show" (1958–1961).  Fields made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Billy Davis in "The Schoolmaster" (episode 86).

Harry Finley

Harry Finley made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Harvey in "End of the Hunt" (episode 162).  He also guest-starred in one episode of the western "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

Mickey Finn

Mickey Finn was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in 45 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 20 years.  A few of his early roles were uncredited, including appearances in the cold war classic "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962), starring Laurence Harvey and Angela Lansbury, and the Disney comedies "The Reluctant Astronaut" (1967) and "The Shakiest Gun in the West" (1968), both starring Don Knotts.  He also appeared in the Rat Pack vehicle "Robin and the 7 Hoods" (1964), in which he played the bartender.  Finn made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying James Newman in "The Lost Treasure of Canyon Town" (episode 99).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire.

James Flavin

James Flavin was a prolific American film, stage and television actor, appearing in nearly 500 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 45 years.  Most of his many early film roles were uncredited.  Following his resignation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, he relocated to Portland, Maine, where he made a living as a taxi driver.  He was eventually discovered by a summer stock casting agent and managed to make his way into serious acting.  He guest-starred in virtually every genre in television, including the immensely popular family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), "Mister Ed" (1961–1965) and "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974), the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "The Roaring 20s" (1960–1962) and "Man with a Camera" (1959–1960), as well as the legal drama "The Public Defender" (1954), the adventure series "The Adventures of Falcon" (1954) and "The Adventures of McGraw" (1957–1958), and Rod Serling's anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  Flavin also appeared in many of the classic variety shows of the Golden Age of Television, including "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" (1950–1958), "The Jack Benny Program" (1950–1965), as well as the anthology drama of the same era, "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961).

Flavin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Morody in "Lariat" (episode 67).  It was one of the few screen roles he had in a western.  Finley's last role was portraying President Dwight D. Eisenhower in the TV movie "Francis Gary Powers: The True Story of the U-2 Spy Incident" (1976).

Fritz Ford

Fritz Ford, born Fred Apking, was an American stuntman and actor.  Between his stunt work and acting credits, Ford appeared in nearly 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He provided stunt work for several films, including the war drama "The Desert Rats" (1953), starring Richard Burton, James Mason and Robert Newton; the sci-fi adventure film "Planet of the Apes" (1962), starring Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter and Maurice Evans; and the sci-fi drama "Soylent Green" (1973), starring Charlton Heston, Anthony Zerbe and Leigh Taylor-Young.  He also appeared in several films as an actor, including minor parts in the noir film "The Big Heat" (1953), starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame; and the sci-fi thriller "Seconds" (1966), starring Rock Hudson; as well as the role of Murray in the horror film "Damien: Omen II" (1975), starring William Holden and Lee Grant.

Ford guest-starred in a variety of popular television shows of the 1960s, including the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968) and the sci-fi series "V" (1984–1985).

Ford made six appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Jones [stunt double for Chuck Connors; uncredited] in "The Safeguard" (episode 8), Deputy Carl [uncredited] in "The Second Witness" (episode 23), Townsman in "The Angry Man" (episode 31), and Second Cowboy in "Ordeal" (episode 48).  He made uncredited appearances in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11) and "The Sheridan Story" (episode 16).

Michael "Mike" Forest

Michael Forest, born Gerald Michael Charleboise, is a prolific American film, television and voice actor.  He has appeared in or provided his voice for more than 200 movies, television shows and video games in a career spanning nearly 60 years.  While studying acting under veteran actor Jeff Corey, Forest was discovered by Roger Corman, who cast him his new film "The Saga of the Viking Women" (1957).  He appeared in two more Corman movies and another directed by brother Gene Corman.  While working in the film industry, Forest continued to work as a stage actor, especially in Shakespearean productions.  He has guest-starred in various popular shows, including the off-beat sci-fi anthology series, "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), Rod Serling's iconic series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow, the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves, and the sci-fi classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), starring William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy.  In recent years, Forest has shifted his focus to voice acting, working primarily on video games and English-dubbed Japanese animation, including "Star Ocean: Till the End of Time" (2003), "Last Exile" (2003) and the late Satoshi Kon's "Paprika" (2006).

Forest made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Chaqua in "The Raid" (episode 37).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he has guest-starred in many other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  Forest also appeared in "Branded" (1965–1966), the Chuck Connors follow-on hit series after THE RIFLEMAN.

Robert Foulk

Robert Foulk was an American actor who made over 200 appearances in film and television in the 1950's through the 1970's.  He also worked as a dialogue coach in his early career.  He was frequently cast in Westerns, including "Last of the Badmen" (1957), "The Tall Stranger" (1957), "The Left-Handed Gun" (1958), and "Cast a Long Shadow" (1958).   He played the recurring role of the Bartender in Joel McCrea's "Witchita Man" (1959) and the next door neighbor in "Father Knows Best" (1955-1959).  Foulk made five appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Toomey the Blacksmith in "The Second Witness" (episode 23), "Three Legged Terror" (episode 30) and "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38).  He played two different characters, Johannson in "The Raid" (episode 37) and Herbert Newman in "The Lost Treasure of Canyon Town" (episode 99).

Michael Fox

Fox guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the sci-fi anthology series "Science Fiction Theatre" (1955–1957), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the sci-fi series "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" (1964–1968), the espionage thriller "Mission Impossible" (1966–1973), the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the Michael Crichton medical drama, "ER" (1994–2009).  He also had several recurring roles, including Blake Yedor in the western "Trackdown" (1957–1959), Coroner George McLeord in the detective series "Burke's Law" (1963–1966), various autopsy surgeons in the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Amos Fedders in the primetime soap opera "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990) and Saul Feinberg in the soap opera "The Bold and the Beautiful" (1987).

Fox made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Trager in "The Trade" (episode 24), Abel in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50), Joe Hannah in "The Hangman" (episode 76) and Jim Oxford in "Miss Milly" (episode 84).  He guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

James Franciscus

James Franciscus was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 75 TV shows and movies in a career spanning 30 years.  Franciscus was formally trained as an actor, having received a bachelor of arts degree in English and theater arts from Yale University.  Franciscus had leading man good looks and throughout his career, he often received top billing.  He had his his first major role in "Naked City" (1958–1963), portraying Detective James "Jimmy" Halloran.  Following his work in "Naked City," Franciscus was given the lead role in the crime drama "The Investigators" (1961), playing the role of Russ Andrews.  He is perhaps best known for playing title roles in NBC's "Mr. Novak" (1963–65) and "Longstreet" (1971–72).  His feature film credits for which he may be best-remembered include John Sturges' "Marooned" (1969), co-starring Gregory Peck and Gene Hackman; Ted Post's "Beneath the Planet of the Apes" (1970), the second movie in the "Planet of the Apes" science fiction franchise; and the star-studded disaster film, "When Time Ran Out" (1980).  Franciscus made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Philip in "Legacy" (episode 51).

Dean Fredericks

Dean Fredericks, born Frederick Joseph Foote, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in 40 movies and television shows in slightly more than a decade.  He served in the military during World War II, for which he received a Purple Heart.  He began acting in the early 1950s and worked under various names, including "Fred Foote" and "Norman Fredric," before finally settling on "Dean Fredericks."  While working on the set of the TV series "The Court of Last Resort" (1957–1958), he was discovered by Milton Caniff, the comic strip creator who later tapped him to play the title role in the TV version of "Steve Canyon" (1958–1960).  Fredericks made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Phil Carver in "Squeeze Play" (episode 152) and Rance in "Requiem at Mission Springs" (episode 164).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

Charles Fredricks

Charles Fredericks was an American film, stage and television actor.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a 15-year career.  He guest-starred in the classic family comedy based on a comic strip of the same name, "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), starring Jay North, the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack, and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., and also the comic superhero adventure "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West.  Despite his high visibility in a wide variety of television genres, Fredericks is best-remembered for his career in B-Western movies and TV shows.  He was also a talented tenor, which earned him the roles of Gaylord Ravenal in the revival of the Broadway play "Show Boat" (1946) and Captain Nicholas Gregorovitch in "Music in My Heart" (1947).  He portrayed the singing King in "My Fair Lady" (1964).

Fredericks made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Steve in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Fredericks guest-starred in a number of other high-profile westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.  Fredericks also guest-starred in Chuck Connors series "Branded" (1965–1966), which followed THE RIFLEMAN.

Bert Freed

Bert Freed was an American actor whose career spanned nearly 40 years.  Born and raised in the Bronx, he began his acting career while attending Penn State University, making his Broadway debut in the 1942 production, "Johnny Two by Four."  His film debut was an uncredited role in the musical "Carnegie Hall" (1947).

Freed was a versatile actor who appeared in more than 75 films and 200 television shows.  He played a wide range of characters—from villains and criminals to their law and order counterparts and the occasional avuncular, good-natured family man.  Whether portraying a gangster or a detective, Freed elicited his character's sympathic or detestable qualities with equal persuasiveness.

His films credits include "Halls of Montezuma" (1950), "Where the Sidewalk Ends" (1950), "The Desperate Hours" (1955), "Paths of Glory" (1957), "Fate Is the Hunter" (1964), "Detective Story" (1951), "Wild in the Streets" (1968), "Billy Jack" (1971) and "Norma Rae" (1979).

Freed made numerous television appearances from the 1950's until his death in 1986.  He guest starred in shows of almost every genre, but was seen with most frequently in detective shows and westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1959–1965), "Perry Mason (1960–1964), 15 episodes of "Shane" (1966), "The Big Valley" (1966–1968), "The Virginian" (1973–1971), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1976–1977) and "Charlies's Angels" (1978).   Freed appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Oat Jackford in "The Money Gun" (episode 33) and Ben Crown in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103).

Lance Fuller

Lance Fuller was an American television and film actor.  He garnered over 50 credits as an actor during a career spanning more than three decades.  Although he had his start in film, almost all of his early roles are uncredited.  He made one appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, playing Earl Battle in "The Sister" (episode 9).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Fuller also appeared in the westerns "Colt .45" (1957–1960), "Tombstone Territory" (1957) and "Lawman" (1958–1962).

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Gary Gadson

Gary Gadson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).

Jim Galante

Jim Galante was an American television actor.  Over a period of two decades, he appeared in nearly 20 television shows.  His film credits came in the last two years of his brief acting career, which included small parts in three films in 1978: the romantic drama "Suddenly, Love," starring Cindy Williams, the Irwin Allen sci-fi thriller "The Swarm," starring Michael Caine, and the sci-fi action adventure "Deathsport," starring David Carradine, and the following year, the Brooke Shields drama "Tilt."  Galante appeared in a few of the most popular series of the 1960s and 70s, including "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray, "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), starring Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman, and "Black Sheep Squadron" (1976–1978), starring Robert Conrad.  Most of his work in television, however, was in the western genre.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the handyman in "Outlaw Shoes" (episode 141).  Other westerns in which he appeared included "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Steven Gardner

Steve Gardner is the son of THE RIFLEMAN executive producer, Arthur Gardner.  He appeared in two episodes as schoolboys, "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11) and "The Schoolteacher" (episode 86).  Gardner currently is an attorney practicing in Los Angeles.

Richard Garland

Richard Garland was an American television and film actor.  In a brief career spanning just two decades, he appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows.  Many of his early roles, especially in films, were uncredited.  He guest-starred in a variety of genres and popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the comic book superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring George Reeves, the dramatic anthology series "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), starring Jon Provost and June Lockhart, and the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and the espionage adventure series, "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves.

Garland made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Travis in "The Jealous Man" (episode 136).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in several other iconic westerns, including "The Adventures of Kit Carson" (1953–1955), starring Bill Williams, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.

Kathy Garver

Kathy Garver is an American film, television and voice actress who has appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows and has narrated or produced numerous audio books and stories in a career spanning nearly six decades.  By the time she graduated from UCLA in 1970, she had been a child actress and had already landed her best-remembered role in one of the most popular family sitcoms of the late 60s/early 70s, playing the teenaged "Cissy" Patterson-Davis in "Family Affair" (1966–1971), starring Brian Keith as Uncle Bill, Sebastian Cabot as Mr. French, and her two on-screen siblings, Johnnie Whitaker as brother Jody and Anissa Jones as sister Buffy.  Among her other television appearances was a recurring role as Tracey Richards in the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), starring Richard Chamberlain, and a guest-starring role in the popular comedy "The Patty Duke Show" (1963–1966).  Garver made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the waitress in "The Queue" (episode 110).  She also guest-starred in the western series "Branded" (1965–1966), which gave her a second opportunity to work with THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.  As a voice actress, Garver's assignments included narrating children's programs and animated characters.  She also produced, narrated, wrote lyrics and composed music for eight audio recordings of Beatrix Potter tales and eight audio tapes based on Mother Goose nursery rhymes (1988–1990).  Garver won two Audie Awards for her narration, one for "The World's Shortest Stories" and the other for her direction of Amy Tan's reading of her book "The Opposite of Fate" (2004).  Together with Geoffrey Mark, Garver has come full circle, co-authoring "The Family Affair Cookbook," which was published in 2009.

Kelton Garwood

Kelton Garwood was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He studied acting at American Theatre Wing in New York.  In preparation for working in the western genre, he took horse-riding and quick-draw lessons.  He appeared in a small number of films, including "Miracle of the Hills" (1959), "Story of Ruth" (1960), "The Sandpiper" (1966), and his last film, "Return to Snowy River" (1988).   He guest-starred in the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), starring Craig Stevens, the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starrring Lloyd Bridges, Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), in which he portrayed the Tramp, and the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack.  Garwood made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Smith in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35) and Tom Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  He was a regular on "Bourbon Street Beat" (1959–1960), playing Beauregard O'Hanlon, and on "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) he had a recurring role as Percy Crump, the undertaker.

James Gavin

James Gavin was an American film and television character actor, as well as a stuntman.  He appeared in nearly 60 movies and television shows over a period of two decades beginning in the late 1950s.  Ruggedly built and craggy-faced, he was cast to type in numerous westerns, war and crime dramas.  Among his TV credits, he appeared in the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr, "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb, and Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the espionage adventure "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves.

Gavin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lee Marston in "Six Years and a Day" (episode 91).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in many other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts Michael Landon, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and John McIntire, "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure.  Gavin also had a recurring role as Sheriff Madden in "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Richard Long.

Lenny Geer

Lenny Geer, born Leonard P. Geer, was an American film and television actor, as well as a stuntman.  He appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows during his 35-year career.  Many roles throughout his career were uncredited.  He was a stunt actor/double (mostly uncredited) in 29 films, and among the leading men for whom he doubled were Robert Mitchum and George Montgomery.  He guest-starred in dozens of TV show, mostly westerns, but he appeared in other genres, as well, including the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and Starsky & Hutch (1975–1979), multiple appearances in the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), doing double-duty in one episode as an animal trainer, and the comedy "The Munsters" (1964–1966).  Geer's film appearances include the romantic comedies "Hero at Large" (1980), starring John Ritter, and "Coast to Coast" (1980), starring Robert Blake, the John Cassavettes film "Love Streams" (1984), in which he co-starred with wife Gena Rowlands, and the action crime drama "Stick" (1985), starring Burt Reynolds and Candice Bergman.

Nick-named the Be-Bop Cowboy, Geer appeared in numerous popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Todd Ullman in "The Indian" (episode 21), a barfly in "The Woman" (episode 32) and a townsman in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  Other westerns in which Geer appeared include "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "Laredo" (1965–1967), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Betty Lou Gerson

Betty Lou Gerson was an American film, radio, television and voice actress who appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost five decades.  She got her start in radio, for which she became known as the "Soap Opera Queen of Chicago."  Upon arriving in Hollywood, she appeared in a string of B-movies including the noir film "Nightmare Alley" (1947), starring Tyrone Power and Joan Blondell, "The Red Menace" (1949), co-starring Robert Rockwell and Hannelore Axman, and "Undercover Girl" (1950), starring Alexis Smith and Scott Brady.  Gerson also played the role of Nurse Andersone in the classic sci-fi horror film "The Fly" (1958), starring David Hedison and Vincent Price.  In television, she guest-starred in various genres, including several crime dramas such as "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Checkmate" (1960–1962), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the dramatic anthology series "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), Rod Serling's iconic sci-fi mystery series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the comedies "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966) and "Hazel" (1961–1966).  In 1950, she began working on Disney productions doing voice work.  She was the narrator for "Cinderella" (1950), had a small cameo role in "Mary Poppins" (1964), and portrayed the evil villainess Cruella De Vil in "One Hundred and One Dalmatians" (1961).  Gerson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ellie Aikens in "The Hangman" (episode 76).  She also guest-starred in the western series "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Richard Long, and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen.

John Gilbert

John Gilbert is the son of Herschel Burke Gilbert, composer of THE RIFLEMAN theme song.  Gilbert made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a messenger boy in "End of the Hunt" (episode 162).

Sid Gillman

Sid Gillman, born Sidney Gillman, was best-known as an American football coach.  In 1983, Gillman was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his work as a coach, followed by the College Football Hall of Fame in 1989.  He appeared on television primarily from 1959 through the 1960s, usually in cameo appearances portraying a coach, including "Adventure Showcase" (1959) and "Alcoa Theater" (1960).  Gillman was one of four sports legends to guest star in THE RIFLEMAN.  He made only one appearance, portraying the bartender, Ben Tooker, in "Heller" (episode 62).

Tom Gilson

Tom Gilson was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows in a short-lived career that ended abruptly with his death at age 28.  Tall and powerfully built, he was cast in numerous westerns, but he also guest-starred in other genres, including the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., and the classic comedy "The Phil Silvers Show" (1955–1959), in which he played Elvin Pelvin, spoofing swivel-hipped rock 'n' roll legend Elvis Presley.  Gilson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Frank Weiden in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  He also guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker.

Johnny Ginger

Johnny Ginger, born Galen Grindle, is an American actor who grew up a family of Vaudeville performers.  He has spent most of his career in comedy, performing stand-up in club venues in Toledo, Detroit and Canada.  Together with a group of other comedians, including Soupy Sales, he helped to pioneer children's television programming in the Detroit area in the 1960s and 50s.  Some of the shows he developed and appeared in include "Curtain Time Theater," "The Johnny Ginger Show," which ran until 1968, and "Captain Detroit."  His screen credits include a Three Stooges movie, "The Outlaw is Coming" (1965), in which he portrayed Billy the Kid, and most recently a romantic comedy-drama, "Meet Monica Velour," starring Kim Cattrall, and a romantic historical drama, "Alleged," both released in 2010.  Ginger made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ted in "Two Ounces of Tin" (episode 131).

Regina Gleason

Regina Gleason is an American television and film actress who has appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning a little over two decades.  She has guest-starred in a variety of television shows, including the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges, the classic family comedy based on a comic strip "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), starring Jay North, and the crime dramas "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), starring Broderick Crawford, "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr.  Gleason made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sarah Marston in "Six Years and a Day" (episode 91).  She also guest-starred in other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), starring Robert Taylor, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon.

John Goddard

John Goddard is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in nearly 60 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 20 years.  He has appeared in quite a few of crime dramas, beginning with a leading role in "Gangbusters" (1952), co-starring Richard Crane and Robert Bice, and also "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb, "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), starring David Janssen, "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr.  Goddard made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Naylor in "One Went to Denver" (episode 25) and Davis in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50).  He also guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Mark Goddard

Mark Goddard is an American film actor whose career began in 1959, when he was signed to appear in the CBS Four Star Television series "Johnny Ringo."  Born Charles Goddard, he changed his name to Mark at the suggestion of friend Chuck Connors.  Distinctive for his rugged good looks, he appeared in numerous television series over the next four decades, but especially in the 1960's and 70's.  Goddard made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Walt in "The Raid" and Marty Blair in "Mark's Rifle" (episode 150).  In a television series that aired for three years (1958-1961), Goddard played the role of Detective Chris Ballard in "The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor."  He is best-known for his role as Major Don West, long-suffering space partner and intemperate foil to the wily and conniving, but cowardly, Dr. Zachary Smith (Jonathan Harris), in the hit 1960's cult television series, "Lost in Space."   He made a cameo appearance in the 1998 movie "Lost in Space," playing a superior officer to his former character, Major Don West.  In 2009 Goddard published his autobiography, To Space and Back.

Pat Goldin

Pat Goldin was a Russian-born television and film actor.  He appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 25 years.  Many of his early roles were in films, which were mostly uncredited bit parts.  Among his television credits were roles in the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and the quirky comedy "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), starring Dwayne Hickman and Bob Denver, as well as a handful of other obscure series.  Goldin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fitch the dress salesman in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).

Thomas Gomez

Thomas Gomez was an American television, stage and film actor.  His filmography includes nearly 100 roles during a career spanning 30 years.  He made his film debut in "Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror" (1942).  Gomez received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his role in the 1974 film "Ride the Pink Horse."

Gomez made one appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, playing Artemus J. Quarles in "Stranger at Night" (episode 36).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Gomez also appeared in "The Texan" (1958–1960), "Laredo" (1965–1967) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Elyse Gordon

Elyse Gordon was an American actress whose filmography is a single guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, in which she played a schoolgirl in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11).

Leo Gordon

Leo Gordon was an American character actor of film and television, as well as a screenwriter.  He had nearly 200 acting credits in a career spanning more than 50 years.  Gordon had a rough start in life, raised in poverty during the Great Depression, serving in World War II and eventually being sentenced to a four-year prison term at the infamous San Quentin state prison in California for armed robbery.  After serving time in prison, Gordon took advantage of the G.I. Bill and enrolled in acting classes at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York.  As an actor, Gordon was typecast as the brutish villain.  He received the "Golden Boot Award" in 1997 for his contributions to the western genre.  Gordon made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Abe Jordan in "The Angry Gun" (episode 12) and Stack Wade in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Gordon also guest-starred in "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Frontier" (1955–1956) and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963).

Don Grady

Don Grady, born Don Louis Agrati, was an American composer and film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 30 years.  He is best-remembered for having grown up on television as a child actor.  He was a Mousketeer on "The Mickey Mouse Club" and had a recurring role as Robbie Douglas in the long-running family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray.  Grady made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeff Barrows in "The Patsy" (episode 41) and David Chase in "Heller" (episode 62).  He also guest-starred in many iconic westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne and Dan Blocker, "Wichita Town" (1959–1960), starring Joel McCrea, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, and "Law of the Plainsman" (1959), starring Michael Ansara as Sam Buckheart (a character he also portrayed on THE RIFLEMAN).  Grady arranged and composed 19 television specials and documentaries, including writing and performing the music for the Blake Edwards comedy "Switch" (1991), starring Ellen Barkin and Jimmy Smits, and most recently the "AFI Life Achievement Award: A Tribute to Meryl Streep" (2004).  Grady passed away on June 27, 2012, at the age of 68.

Fred Graham

Fred Graham, born Charles Frederick Graham, was an American stuntman and actor.  Between his stunt work and acting credits, he appeared in more than 400 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  When he had speaking parts, he usually appeared as a bearded villain.  As a stuntman, he was known for his baseball expertise.  Following his retirement from acting, Graham served as the director of the Arizona Motion Pictures Development Office.

Graham provided stunt work for many films, including the adventure film "The Adventures of Robin Hood" (1938), starring Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Basil Rathbone and Claude Rains; the western "Fort Apache" (1948), starring John Wayne; the sci-fi classic "The War of the Worlds" (1953), starring Gene Barry; the Alfred Hitchcock thriller "Rear Window" (1954), starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly and Raymond Burr; and the western "Rio Bravo" (1959), starring John Wayne, Dean Martin and Ricky Nelson.

As an actor, Graham had minor parts in several films, including the noir films "The Woman in the Window" (1944), starring Edward G. Robinson and Joan Bennett, and "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), starring Sterling Hayden and Louis Calhern.  He also appeared in another Hitchcock thriller "Vertigo" (1958), this time pairing James Stewart with Kim Novak.  He also guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the Disney anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990) and the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).

Graham made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hank the drunk in "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.

Michael Greene

Michael Greene is an American film and television actor.  He appeared on stage in productions of "Endgame" and "Metamorphosis," and he has appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows in a career that has spanned more than four decades.  Among his film credits, Greene appeared in the family drama "Spencer's Mountain" (1963), starring Henry Fonda and Maureen O'Hara, the Woody Allen comedy "Play It Again, Sam" (1972), co-starring Diane Keaton, the sci-fi action adventure "The Clones" (1973), starring Greene in the leading role of Dr. Gerald Appleby, the comedy "Moscow on the Hudson" (1984), starring Robin Williams, William Friedkin's adaptation of the noir thriller "To Live and Die in L.A." (1985), starring Willem Dafoe, and the romantic comedy "Nice Guys Sleep Alone" (1999), with Greene playing the lead Slick Willie.  He has guest-starred in a wide variety of television shows, including the comic superhero adventure series "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West, the action-adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine,and the espionage adventure franchise "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves.  Greene made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying George Vale in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he has guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury and Doug McClure, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon.

Dabbs Greer

Dabbs Greer was an American actor who had a prolific career spanning more than 50 years.   A highly recognizable character actor—the quintessential everyman—he played a wide range of supporting roles in film and television.  Originally from Missouri, his southern accent lent authenticity to the rural characters he often portrayed, especially in Westerns.  Frequently cast as a minister, his most memorable role may have been Reverend Alden in "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).

Greer made his film debut in the 1938 feature "Jesse James."  He appeared in the 1958 film noir "I Want to Live" and reprised a similar role in the 1999 film, "The Green Mile," in which he played the Tom Hank's character, Paul Edgecomb, as an elderly man.  

Greer appeared in several recurring roles in popular television series in the 1950's and 1960's, including THE RIFLEMAN, in which he guest-starred eight times: he portrayed Marcus Trimble in "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38), Sam Elder in "Boomerang" (episode 39), Brett in "Panic" (episode 47), Farley Steel in "The Jailbird" (episode 73), Jack Scully in "The Promoter" (episode 87), Finny in "The Wyoming Story, Parts I and II" (episodes 96 and 97), and Taylor, a prison guard in "The Stand-In" (episode 114).

Greer's recurring roles in other popular TV series included "Hank" (1965–1966), in which he played track coach Ossie Weiss, The Ghost & Mrs. Muir" (1968-–1970), as Sheriff Norris "Norrie" Coolidge, and in"Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) as storekeeper Wilbur Jonas.

Jack Grinnage

Jack Grinnage, born Jack Eugene Stewart, is an American actor of stage, film and television.  He has appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than five decades.  He made a fateful early career choice by turning down a part in "Forbidden Planet" (1956) to take the role of Moose in "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955), starring James Dean.  He also appeared in the Elvis Presley vehicle "King Creole" (1958) and a small number of other less memorable films.  Grinnage has appeared in a wide variety of popular TV shows ranging from the family comedies "Father Knows Best" (1955–1960) and "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–Hutch), and more recently, the comedy series "Scrubs" (2001–2010), starring an ensemble cast led by Zach Braff, and the HBO drama "Six Feet Under" (2001–2005), starring Peter Krause and Michael C. Hall.  He also had a recurring role portraying Ron Updyke in the campy horror series "Kolchak: The Night Stalker" (1974–1975), starring Darren McGavin playing an investigative reporter.  Grinnage made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Kirby Mitchell in "The Legacy" (episode 51).  He also guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Laredo" (1965ޯ), starring Neville Brand.

Raymond Guth

Raymond Guth is an American film, television and voice actor.  He has appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 50 years.  He has had bit parts in several well-received films, including the fertilizer man in the comedy "The Flim-Flam Man" (1967), starring George C. Scott and Sue Lyon; Uncle Ike in the comedy-drama based on the novel by William Faulkner, "The Reivers" (1969), starring Steve McQueen; Jackson in the western drama "Bad Company" (1972), starring a young Jeff Bridges; the night watchman in the comedy "Silver Streak" (1976), starring Gene Wilder, Richard Pryor and Jill Clayburgh; and the motel clerk in the comedy drama "Some Kind of Hero" (1982), starring Richard Pryor.  Guth has guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the police action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the sci-fi thriller "The Invaders" (1967–1968), the family comedy "Happy Days" (1974–1984), and the long-running family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).  In recent years, Guth has been working in the video games industry, lending his voice to the critically acclaimed titles "Jade Empire" (2005), "Bioshock" (2007) and "Bioshock 2" (2010).

Guth made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charley Breen in "Incident at Line Shack Six" (episode 156).  He also guest-starred in many others westerns of the 1960s and 70s, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Alias Smith and Jones" (1971–1973), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

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Buddy Hackett

Buddy Hackett, born Leonard Hacker, was an American stage, film, voice and television actor; however, he is best-remembered for his work as a comedian.  He appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows in a career spanning just over 50 years.  Hackett became interested in acting during his high school years, after directing a school production entitled "What a Life."  After serving in the army during World War II, he ventured into the entertainment industry as a stand-up comic, playing at venues from the Catskills to Las Vegas and Los Angeles.  He and Lenny Bruce are credited with pioneering "blue" comedy.  Their acts were built around adult humor and off-color jokes that were tame compared against later generations of comics.   After a rough start with a string of unsuccessful east coast stints, Hackett went on to become so successful that he could be the headliner at any major nightclub in the US.  He became well-known to mainstream America with his many appearances on late night talk shows hosted by Jack Paar, Arthur Godfrey, and later Johnny Carson.  He also was a frequent guest on the game shows "What's My Line" and "Hollywood Squares."

Having a gift for physical humor, with a rubbery face and doughy physique, Hackett was typecast as clownish characters.  His performances on stage and in film often were the most memorable feature in otherwise forgettable productions.  His performance, for example, portraying a Coney Island soothsayer in the play "I Had a Ball" (1964) transformed it from a critical failure into a box office success.  Seeing Hackett play serious roles did not resonate with audiences, so most of his movie and TV credits are for comedy-themed productions.  His film credits include the racy humor-tinged film adaptation of "God's Little Acre" (1958), the animated adventure "The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm" (1962), the musical comedy "The Music Man" (1962), and the madcap action-adventure film "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" (1963).  He also lent his voice to Scuttle in "The Little Mermaid" (1989).  In television, Hackett played the title role in the short-lived sitcom "Stanley" (1956–1957), co-starring Carol Burnett, and toward the end of his career, he played the recurring role of Uncle Lonnie in the comedy drama "Action" (1999–2000), starring Jay Mohr.  He made occasional appearances in popular shows over four decades, from the 1950s through the 90s, including the western "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, Richard Long and Lee Majors, the Buck Henry comedy spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), starring Don Adams and Barbara Feldman, the comedy variety show "Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In" (1967–1973), the action-adventure "The Fall Guy" (1981–1986), starring Lee Majors, the mystery whodunit "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), starring Angela Lansbury, and many other shows.  Hackett made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Daniel "Pop" Malakie in "BloodLines" (episode 42) and the title character in "The Clarence Bibs Story" (episode 104).

Kevin Hagen

Kevin Hagen, born Donald N. Hagen, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in 120 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  Born to ballroom dancers, Hagen led a varied life, first serving in the navy, then attending UCLA to study law while teaching ballroom dancing on the side, and finally settling on acting as his career.  He was discovered while performing in a production of Eugene O'Neill's play "Desire Under the Elms," published in 1924 and widely regarded as an American classic.  Subsequently, Hagen became a prominent presence in television, especially in crime dramas and westerns.  He had a few recurring roles, including the role for which he is best-remembered, Dr. Hiram Baker, in the long-running family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), as well as John Colton in the western "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959) and Inspector Dobbs Kobick in the sci-fi series "The Land of Giants" (1968–1970).  He guest-starred in many other popular shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Ironside" (1967–1975) and"Mannix" (1967–1975), the sci-fi series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), "The Time Tunnel" (1966–1967), and "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" (1964–1968), as well as the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the undercover police series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the comedy "M*A*S*H" (1972–1983) and the ongoing daytime drama "General Hospital" (1963– present).  In addition to television, Hagen had a few film roles, including a rebel deserter in the western war drama "Shenandoah" (1965), starring James Stewart, and a poker player in the biographical action film "The Hunter" (1980), starring Steve McQueen.

Hagen made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Billy St. John in "The Prodigal" (episode 71) and Harry Devers in "The Decision" (episode 116).  He also guest-starred in many other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Branded" (1965–1966), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).

Ron Hagerthy

Ronald F. "Ron" Hagerthy is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning just two decades.  Primarily a television actor, Hagerthy also appeared in several films, including his acting debut in "I Was a Communist for the FBI" (1951), in which he portrayed Dick Cvetic, the romantic war drama "Force of Arms" (1951), in which he played Minto, and the musical "Starlift" (1951), in which he portrayed Rick Williams.  Although he appeared mostly in TV westerns, Hagerthy guest-starred in other genres, as well, including the anthology drama "Fireside Theatre" (1949–1955), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the comedy series "The Jack Benny Program" (1950–1965), and the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  His most memorable role was portraying Clipper King in the modern western series "Sky King" (1951–1959), starring Kirby Grant and Gloria Winters.

Hagerthy made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Haskell in "The Deserter" (episode 65).  Hagerthy guest-starred in dozens of the most popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "The Texan" (1958–1960), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The High Chapparal" (1967–1971), and many other shows.

Frank Hagney

Frank Hagney was a prolific Australian film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 400 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  Despite his voluminous filmography, many of his roles were uncredited.  He began acting in films during the silent era.  His roles from this period include "Spike" Kelly in the drama "The Battler" (1919), Dick Blackwell in the western "The Silent Stranger" (1924), and Daggoo in "The Sea Beast" (1926), which was a film adaptation of "Moby Dick."  Although he rarely portrayed leading roles, Hagney often brushed shoulders with Hollywood heavyweights.  He was in the romantic western "Ride Him, Cowboy" (1932), starring John Wayne, the film adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.  Hyde" (1941), starring Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner, the family drama "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946), starring James Stewart and Donna Reed, the comedy western "Paleface" (1948), starring Bob Hope and Jane Russell, and the action-adventure film "3:10 to Yuma" (1957), starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin.

Most of Hageny's more significant television roles were in the western genre. He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nils in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He also guest-starred in "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Tony Haig

Tony Haig is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 50 years.  He began acting as a child and remains active to this day.  He has guest-starred in various popular television shows, including the family series "Shirley Temple Theatre" (1958–1961), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964) and the crime dramas "Police Story" (1973–1977) and "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977).  Haig also has had a few minor film roles, including the second officer in the sci-fi film "The Swarm" (1978), starring Michael Caine, Katharine Ross and Richard Widmark, and he portrayed Jack in the horror film "The Clonus Horror" (1979), starring Peter Graves.  In addition to his accomplishments as an actor, Haig was the producer of the comedy short "Game Night" (2011).  Haig made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Percy in "Hostages to Fortune" (episode 160).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Claude Hall

Claude Hall is an American film and television actor, as well as a one-time screenwriter.  He has appeared in 16 movies and television shows in a career of just one decade.  He had various uncredited roles in movies featuring iconic stars, including the drama "Ada" (1961), starring Susan Hayward and Dean Martin, the musicals "State Fair" (1962), starring Pat Boone and Ann-Margret, and "Viva Las Vegas" (1964), starring Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret, and the drama "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), starring Steve McQueen and Ann-Margret.  He was also the screenwriter for the western film "The Devil's Bedroom" (1964).  In television, virtually all of his notable credits were in the western genre.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeb Croton in "Incident at Line Shack Six" (episode 156).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors, "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, and "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), starring Walter Brennan and Dack Rambo.

Bob Hall

Bob Hall, sometimes credited as Bob Hull, is an American television and film actor.  He has appeared in five movies and television shows in a decade-long career.  He guest-starred in one of the last major anthology series, "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" (1963–1967).  He also portrayed Johnson in the western film "Shalako" (1968), starring Sean Connery and Brigitte Bardot.  Hall made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the minister in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).  He also guest-starred in the western "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.

Eileen Harley (Wallace Earl Sparks Laven)

Born Amanda Foulger, Wallace Earl Sparks was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in nearly 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost four decades.  Her filmography lists credits under various stage names, including Eileen Harley and Amanda Ames.  According to Laven's daughter Barbara, she took the stage name Eileen from a childhood friend and put it together with Harley, which was a family name.  She borrowed the stage name Amanda from another friend who was a professional dancer and with whom she appeared in several musicals.  According to her daughter, Laven thought Amanda sounded well with Ames.  She was married to Arnold Laven, late co-founder of Levy-Gardner-Laven Productions and creator, producer and director of THE RIFLEMAN.  They sometimes worked together.  Harley guest-starred in many popular television shows, especially crime dramas, including "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), which starred Chuck Connors, Ben Gazarra and Roger Perry; "Ironside" (1967–1975), starring Raymond Burr; "Police Woman" (1974–1978), starring Angie Dickenson and Earl Holliman; "The Rockford Files" (1974–1980), starring James Garner; and "Hardcastle and McCormick" (1983–1986), starring Brian Keith; as well as the family comedy "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and the medical dramas "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), starring Richard Chamberlain, and "Marcus Welby, M.D." (1969–1976), starring Robert Young and James Brolin.

Wallace Earl appeared in several films, playing an uncredited part in the dramatic comedy "Blue Astaire" (1946), starring Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby; Sally in the sci-fi film "The Monster That Challenged the World" (1957), directed by Arnold Laven; an uncredited role in the biographical action film "Geronimo" (1962), starring Chuck Connors and directed by Arnold Laven; and Ellie in the musical comedy "Clambake" (1967), starring Elvis Presley.

Wallace Earl made five appearances (under several different stage names) in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clair Wheatley Carney in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17), Myrtle in "The Hangman" (episode 76) and "The Silent Knife" (episode 89), Mrs. Lovering in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103), and Ruth in "The Executioner" (episode 142).  She also guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1960s and 70s, including "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.  Wallace Earl Laven passed away February 27, 2012 after a long illness.

John Harmon

John Harmon was an American actor who appeared in over 250 roles in film and television from the 1930's through the 1970's.  His early roles were mostly uncredited, but he was cast in a wide variety of genres and played many different kinds of characters.  Harmon appeared in 15 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN as Eddie Halstead Hotel Clerk at the Hotel Madera.  The character of Halstead was first introduced in episode 7, "Duel of Honor."

Michael Harris

Michael Harris was an American actor whose filmography was limited to performances in THE RIFLEMAN.  He appeared in an uncredited role in "The Sister" (episode 9), played a cowhand in "The Challenge" (episode 28) and portrayed Ed Bundy in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154).

Robert H. Harris

Robert H. Harris, born Robert H. Hurwitz, was an American actor who appeared in more than 100 roles for television, film and theater in a career spanning nearly three decades.  Harris was primarily a television actor, more often than not playing the villain.   Among his many television credits, he appeared eight times in "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1956–1961) and six times in "Perry Mason"( 1958—1965).

Prior to his first appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, Harris was a guest star on other western series, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Rough Riders" (1958–1959), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959) and "Wanted: Dead of Alive" (1958–1961).  Harris made two appearances on THE RIFLEMAN.  In "The Wrong Man" (episode 27), the plot revolved around a case of mistaken identity in the characters he portrayed—Col. Beauregard 'Curly' Smith, Frank Hardy, Pete Dawson.  He also played Ezra Martin in "Tension" (episode 45).

Charles Harrison

Charles Harrison was a one-time actor, as well as a radio and television personality.  He worked for local television stations in Texas and Michigan, and he was also a field reporter for ABC during the Gemini space flight program.  At the beginning of the Korean War, he conducted the only radio interview with Jonathan M. Wainwright, the World War II "hero of the Bataan."  Charles Harrison made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stagecoach driver in "Quiet Night, Deadly Night" (episode 146).  Originally, he was going to play the part of Lee Coyle, the villain, but the part went to Ed Ames instead, because the show's producers decided Harrison's build was to too slight for the role, and he looked over-matched by Chuck Connors, who stood 6' 4" tall.

Joe Haworth

Joe Haworth was an American film and television actor, in addition to being a notable Hollywood photographer.  Born into an acting family, Haworth appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during his 40-year career.  Most of his movie roles were uncredited; although, he appeared in many film classics, including the noir film "Thieves' Highway" (1949), the war dramas "Gung Ho!: The Story of Carlson's Makin Island Raiders" (1943), which was his film debut, "Red Badge of Courage" (1951) and "The Caine Mutiny" (1954).  He also appeared in the action-adventure film "3:10 to Yuma" (1957), and Stanley Kubrick's Oscar-winning film based on the novel of the same name, "Spartacus" (1960).  Haworth also appeared in the western "The Royal Mounted Rides Again" (1945), in which he replaced Addison Randall, who was killed on the first day of filming.

In television, Haworth proved to be quite a versatile actor, guest-starring in many popular series of the 1950s through the 70s, including the comedy "The Abbott and Costello Show" (1952–1953), the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the crime dramas "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "M Squad" (1957–1960), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), and the long-running family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).

Haworth made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Marshal Bennett in "End of a Young Gun" (episode 3) and Davis in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  Haworth guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "My Friend Flicka" (1955–1958), starring Frank Ferguson, "Alias Smith and Jones" (1971–1973), starring Ben Murphy and Pete Duel, "Sky King" (1951–1962), starring Kirby Grant and Gloria Winters, "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), starring Gail Davis, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Ron Hayes

Ron Hayes was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 70 television shows during his 30-year career.  Born into an acting family, Hayes had a resonant voice, handsome features, and was a natural performer—he never had trouble finding work as an actor.  After graduating from Stanford University with a degree in foreign relations, he served as a Marine during the Korean War, and following his service, he found his true calling in environmentalism, where his acting skills and natural gift for oratory often helped him in his role as a spokesman.  He was involved with the Sierra Club and eventually co-founded his own environmental group, Wilderness World.  In 1970, he was one of the co-founders of Earth Day.

In television, Hayes guest-starred primarily in crime dramas, action-adventure series and westerns.  During the 1950s through the 60s, he made appearances in numerous popular series, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), and the short-lived action series "Everglades" (1961), in which he had a starring role as Lincoln Vail.  He continued acting through the 1980s, guest-starring in the action series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), in which he made multiple appearances as Garth Holden, the crime drama "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980), the drama "Dallas" (1978–1991), in which he had a recurring role as Hank Johnson, and the action series "The A-Team" (1983–1987).  Hayes made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bruce in "Six Years and a Day" (episode 91).  He appeared in many other popular westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), in which he had a recurring role as Wyatt Earp, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and "The Rounders" (1966–1967), in which he had a starring role as Ben Jones .

Jim Hayward

Jim Hayward was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in 120 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 20 years.  He guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the comic book hero action series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957) and "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), and the comedies "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970) and "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971).  Hayward also made uncredited appearances in several films, including the romantic drama "Beloved Infidel" (1959), starring Gregory Peck and Deborah Kerr, the westerns "Decision at Sundown" (1957), starring Randolph Scott, "Vengeance Valley" (1951), starring Burt Lancaster, and "The Big Sky" (1952), starring Kirk Douglas, the family comedy "Father of the Bride" (1950), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor, and the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphey and Bill Mauldin.

Hayward made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tucker in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).  He also guest-starred in many other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Fury" (1955–1960), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "The Texan" (1958–1960), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961).

Bruce Hayward

Bruce Hayward made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stagecoach driver in "Sheer Terror" (episode 113).

Pat Henry

Pat Henry was an American film and television actor, but he worked in the entertainment industry primarily as a comedian.  He made guest appearances in variety and late night talk shows, including "The Ed Sullivan Show" (1948–1971), "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" (1962–1992), "The Dean Martin Comedy Hour" (1965–1974) and "The Merv Griffin Show" (aired intermittently between 1962–1986)  He also had a few film roles, including Mercidis in the crime drama "The Detective" (1968), and Rubin in the comedy "Lady in the Cement" (1968), both films starring Frank Sinatra.  Henry made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the hardware store merchant in "The Most Amazing Man" (episode 151).

Pepe Hern

Pepe Hern, born Jose Hernandez Bethancourt, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He tended to be cast as Spaniards or Latinos, appearing in uncredited roles and bit parts in several films, including the comedy "My Favorite Spy" (1951), starring Bob Hope and Hedy Lamarr, the crime drama "Madigan" (1968), starring Richard Widmark, Henry Fonda and Inger Stevens, the drama "Crisis" (1950), starring Cary Grant and Jose Ferrer, and the westerns "Joe Kidd" (1972), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner.  He also guest-starred in various popular shows of the 1960s through the 80s, including the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the comedy "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970), the police dramas "Adam-12" (1968–1975) and "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the Aaron Spelling action series "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981) and the comedy whodunit series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).

Hern made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sleeper in "Waste" (episode 74) and Lazeros in "Vaqueros" (episode 111).  He also guest-starred in many other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne.

Harry Hickox

Harry Hickox was an American radio, stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than two decades.  He got his start in theater, working with stock companies and the Albuquerque Civic Playhouse.  Following his early work on the stage, Hickox became primarily a television actor; although, he also had a few film roles, including police chief Art Fuller in the comedy "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1966), starring Don Knotts, a bartender in John Ford's "Cheyenne Autumn" (1966), the cook in the musical "Speedway" (1968), staring Elvis Presley and Nancy Sinatra, and Charlie Cowell in the musical comedy "The Music Man" (1962), starring Robert Preston, a role he reprised from the stage production.  In television, Hickox guest-starred in a variety of popular shows of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, including the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Ironside" (1967–1975), "Adam-12" (1968–1975) and "Kojak" (1973–1978), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the action series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family comedy "The Partridge Family" (1970–1974), and the long-running family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981).  He also had a recurring role as Sergeant Orville King in the comedy "No Time for Sergeants" (1964).

Hickox made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stage driver in "The Angry Gun" (episode 13).  He also guest-stared in several other popular westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Cowboy G-Men" (1952), which was his first TV role, "The Adventures of Kit Carson" (1951–1955), "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Laredo" (1965–1967), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Alias Smith and Jones" (1971–1973), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Joe Higgins

Joe Higgins was an American actor working primarily in television and commercials from the 1960's through the 1980's.  His acting career began at age nine and while attending the University of Dayton in Ohio, he worked in radio.  He became a prolific character actor who often portrayed a sheriff in commercials, public service announcements and in print ads.  He won the CLIO award on two occasions for his acting in commercials.  His portrayal as a sheriff, "You in a heap o' trouble, boy!," in a series of memorable Dodge car commercials in the 1970's became his iconic signature role.

Higgins appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN playing different characters, and he played the semi-regular character, Nils Swenson, the Blacksmith, in 17 episodes.  He played recurring roles on other television series in addition to THE RIFLEMAN, including "Arrest and Trial" and later, he co-starred again with Chuck Connors in "Flipper" and "Geronimo."

Michael Hinn

Michael Hinn was an American film and television character actor, as well as a director and producer.  He appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows in a 20-year career.  He is best-remembered for his portrayals of authority figures in the western genre.  Although primarily an actor, Hinn also directed and produced the western TV short "The Night Rider" (1962).  In television, he guest-starred almost exclusively in westerns, notable exceptions being the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and the action series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).  Hinn also had a few film roles, including a stableman in the western "Gun Fever" (1958), starring Mark Stevens, Joe Dobbs in the dramatic comedy "The Reivers" (1969), starring Steve McQueen, and an uncredited rifle range attendant in the action film "The Mechanic" (1972), starring Charles Bronson.

Hinn made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeff Borden in "A Matter of Faith" (episode 34) and one of the henchman in "The Fourflusher" (episode 72).  He also guest-starred in many other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Sheriff of Cochise" (1956–1958), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Sky King" (1951–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Texan" (1958–1960), "Johnny Ringo" (1959–1960), in which he made multiple appearances as George Haig, as well as other characters, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Earl Hodgins

Earle Hodgins was a prolific American character actor in film and television.  He appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He is best-remembered for his portrayals of fast-talking pitchmen, carnival barkers, auctioneers and assorted snake oil salesmen and charlatans; although, most of his roles were uncredited and many did not give him the opportunity to demonstrate his gift for rapid-fire delivery.  In film, Hodgins was a remarkably versatile actor, appearing in everything from westerns to romantic comedies.  He appeared in more than 100 (mostly) B-westerns, including "Paradise Canyon" (1935), "Borderland" (1937), "Idaho" (1943), "Forty Thieves" (1944), "The Devil's Playground" (1946), "Return of the Bad Men" (1948) and "The Paleface" (1948), the horror film "The Walking Dead" (1936), the romantic comedy "My Favorite Wife" (1940), the crime drama "Criminals Within" (1943), the superhero adventure "Batman" (1943), and the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's classic novel "East of Eden" (1955).  After many years as a film actor, Hodgins segued into television, continuing to be a familiar presence in the western genre.  He guest-starred in several other popular series of the early television era, including the crime drama "Boston Blackie" (1951–1953), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959) and Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  In addition to his significant contributions to film and television, Hodgins lent his voice to the Porky Pig cartoons of the 1930s.

Hodgins made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the auctioneer in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He also guest-starred in many other classic westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), "The Range Rider" (1951–1953), "Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951–1958), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "Sky King" (1951–1962), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1956), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).

Pat Hogan

Pat Hogan, born Thurman Lee Haas, was an American film and television actor, as well as a writer.  He appeared in 40 movies and television shows during his 15-year career.  Following his service in the Army, Hogan began acting in minor film roles.  His first major role was Chief Red Stick in "Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier" (1955), and like most of his roles to follow, he was typecast playing Native Americans.  His other film roles include Jim Eagle in "Arrowhead" (1953), starring Charlton Heston, Mungo in "The Last Frontier" (1955), starring Victor Mature, Guy Madison and Robert Preston, and he portrayed Sutamakis in "Indian Paint" (1965), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Johnny Crawford.  In television, Hogan appeared mostly in westerns; although, he also guest-starred in the Disney productions "Zorro" (1957–1959), starring Guy Williams, and "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), in which he had a recurring role as Geronimo.  Hogan made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Artak in "The Raid" (episode 37).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Brave Eagle" (1955–1956), in which he had a recurring role as Black Cloud, "My Friend Flicka" (1955–1958), starring Frank Ferguson, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  As a writer, Hogan wrote mainly for men's magazines, for which he received a complimentary letter from famed American author John Steinbeck.

Jack Hogan

Jack Hogan, born Richard Roland Benson, Jr., is an American character actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 40 years.  Following his service in the Navy, Hogan studied at the Pasadena Playhouse in California to become an actor.  He guest-starred in many popular series of the 1960s through the 80s, including the crime dramas "Hawaii Five-O" (1968–1980), "Adam-12" (1968–1975), "Magnum, P.I." (1980–1988), for which he also worked behind the scenes in the casting department, and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the action series "The A-Team" (1983–1987), and the mystery thriller "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961).  He also had a few recurring roles, including his best-remembered role as the quick-tempered womanizer Kirby in the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), and Chief Ranger Jack Moore in the action series "Sierra" (1974), as well as Judge Smithwood in the crime drama "Jake and the Fatman" (1987–1992).

Hogan made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe Carson in "Stranger at Night" (episode 36) and Rudy Gray in "The Man from Salinas" (episode 130).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Lawman" (1958–1962), starring John Russell and Peter Brown, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Bat Masterson" (1958, 1961), starring Gene Barry, and "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker.

Cheryl Holdridge

Cheryl Holdridge, born Cheryl Lynn Phelps, was an American actress who worked primarily in television.  She appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows during a career spanning 45 years.  At the age of nine, Holdridge had a role in the New York City Ballet's version of "The Nut Cracker" in Los Angeles.  She was one of the original mouseketeers in "The Mickey Mouse Club" (1955–1996).  In 1960, she toured Australia with other former mouseketeers.

Holdridge guest-starred in several television family comedies, including "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966), "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966),"Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966) and "My Three Sons" (1960–1972).  She also guest-starred in the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sally Walker in "A Young Man's Fancy" (episode 129).  She also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Rex Holman

Rex Holman, born Rexford George Holman, is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  Among his movie credits were roles in the sci-fi thriller "Panic in the Year Zero!" (1962), directed by and starring Ray Milland; the sci-fi adventure "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier" (1989), starring William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley; the Disney comedy western "The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again" (1973); and the historical drama "The Hindenburg" (1975), starring George C. Scott.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, including Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975), the police dramas "The Mod Squad" (1968–1973) and "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), and the western action adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).

Holman made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Simms in "The Jealous Man" (episode 136), Billy Graves in "Death Never Rides Alone" (episode 147) and Bob Sherman in "Old Man Running" (episode 166).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Skip Homeier

Skip Homeier, born George Vincent Homeier, is an American radio, stage, film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 130 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He began acting as a child, appearing in the radio soap opera "Portia Faces Life."  He portrayed Emil Bruckner in the Broadway play "Tomorrow the World," a role that he later reprised in the film version opposite Fredric March and Agnes Moorehead.  Throughout his childhood career, Homeier often played juvenile delinquents, mirroring his typecasting as a heavy in adulthood.

Most of Homeier's film roles were early in his career, but included varied characters, such as Hunt Bromley in the western "Gunfighter" (1950), starring Gregory Peck, and Ollie Weaver in the Don Knotts comedy "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1966).  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the macabre family comedy "The Addams Family" (1964–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975), the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), the Aaron Spelling fantasy series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984) and the medical mystery "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).

Homeier played the leading role in the crime drama "Dan Raven" (1960–1961) and later played the recurring role of Dr. Hugh Jacoby in the medical drama "The Interns" (1970–1971).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Brud Evans in "The Spoiler" (episode 61).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Dick Kay Hong

Dick Kay Hong appeared in nine movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He began his brief career as a child actor playing a minor part in the musical "The King and I" (1956), starring Yul Brynner, Deborah Kerr and Rita Moreno.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the anthology series "The Barbara Stanwyck Show" (1960–1961) and the comedy "Green Acres" (1965–1971).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Wang Lee in "The Queue" (episode 110), son of Chinese immigrant Wing Chi, who was played by Victor Sen Yung, better-known for playing the cook Hop Sing on the long-running western "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Hong's last film role was in the 1973 television family drama "A Brand New Life," starring Martin Balsam and Cloris Leachman.

Dennis Hopper

Dennis Lee Hopper was an American actor, filmmaker, and artist.  Hopper became interested in acting and eventually became a student of the Actors Studio.  He made his first appearance as an actor in 1955, appearing in two films co-starring James Dean, "Rebel Without a Cause," and "Giant."  Over the next ten years, Hopper appeared frequently on television in guest roles, and by the end of the 1960's had played supporting roles in several films.  He directed and starred in "Easy Rider," winning an award at the Cannes Film Festival.  He also was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay as co-writer of the film's script.  Hopper appeared in THE RIFLEMAN pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter," in the title role.  He also appeared in "Three-Legged Terror" (episode 30) as Johnny Clover.  By mid-career, he was unable to build on his early success for several years, until a feature role in "Apocalypse Now" brought him back to public attention.  He subsequently appeared in "Rumble Fish" and "The Osterman Weekend."   Hopper received critical recognition for his work in "Blue Velvet" and "Hoosiers," the latter film garnering him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.  He directed "Colors," portrayed King Koopa in the film version of "Super Mario Brothers," and he played the villain in "Speed."  Hopper's latest work included a leading role in the television series "Crash."  Hopper was a prolific photographer, painter, and sculptor whose works have been exhibited world wide.

Robert F. Hoy

Robert "Bobby" F. Hoy was an American film and television actor, as well as a director and stuntman.  He appeared in more than 160 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 60 years.  After serving in the United States Marines during World War II, Hoy decided to pursue a career in show business.  He worked as a stunt double for many acclaimed actors, including Charles Bronson, Tony Curtis, Audie Murphy, Tyrone Power, Jay Silverheels and David Janssen.  In 1961, Hoy co-founded the Stuntmen's Association of Motion Pictures.

Hoy appeared in numerous films, often playing minor parts or doing stunt work, including the musical drama "A Star Is Born" (1954), starring Judy Garland and James Mason; the biographical war drama "To Hell and Back" (1955), starring Audie Murphy; Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of "Spartacus" (1960), starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier and Jean Simmons; the Blake Edwards adventure comedy "The Great Race" (1965), starring Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon and Natalie Wood; the westerns "Nevada Smith" (1966), starring Steve McQueen, and "The Gambler:  The Adventure Continues" (1983), starring Kenny Rogers, as well as William A. Frakers "The Legend of the Lone Ranger" (1981).  He appeared in several Clint Eastwood pictures, including "The Outlaw Josey Wales" and "The Enforcer" (both 1976) and "Bronco Billy" (1980)

Hoy guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the espionage thrillers "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the western action adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), the Aaron Spelling fantasy series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), the medical mystery "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983) and the primetime drama "Dallas" (1978–1991).

Hoy's most famous role was the recurring character of Joe Butler in the western series "The High Chaparral" (1967–1971).  He made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lester in "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78), Dabbs in "The Promoter" (episode 87) and a member of Wade's gang in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, the genre for which he was best-known and most fondly remembered, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  Toward the end of his life, Hoy was honored with a Golden Boot Award by the Motion Picture and Television Fund for making significant contributions to the western genre.  He made his final television appearance in the crime drama "NCIS" (2003– ).

Rodolfo Hoyos, Jr.

Rodolfo Hoyos, Jr., was a prolific Mexican actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in 170 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He had a few film roles, including Capt. Ortega in the thriller "Seven Days in May" (1964), starring Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March and Ava Gardner; and a minor part in the romantic drama "Gilda" (1946), starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford.

Hoyos starred in the short-lived comedy series "Viva Valdez" (1976), portraying Luis Valdez.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the classic family sitcom "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage thrillers "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Mission Impossible" (1966–1973), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the police drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975) and the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990).

Hoyos made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pablo in "Home Ranch" (episode 2) and Luis in "The Prodigal" (episode 71).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), starring Duncan Renaldo and Leo Carillo; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

John Hoyt

John Hoyt, born John McArthur Hoysradt, was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 240 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  A Yale graduate, Hoyt worked as a history instructor, acting coach and nightclub comedian prior to devoting himself to acting full-time.  In 1937, he joined the Orson Welles Mercury Theatre.  He had roles in several memorable films, including Spencer in the drama "Brute Force" (1947), starring Burt Lancaster and Hume Cronyn; Decius Caesar in the historical drama "Julius Caesar" (1953), starring Louis Calhern, Marlon Brando, James Mason and John Gielgud; Caius in Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of "Spartacus" (1960), starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier and Jean Simmons; and the space commander in the romantic comedy "Desperately Seeking Susan" (1985), starring Rosanna Arquette, Aidan Quinn and Madonna.

Hoyt guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the undercover police drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the classic family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968), the sci-fi cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970) and the sci-fi adventure series "Battlestar Galactica" (1978–1979).

Hoyt made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fremont in "Three-Legged Terror" (episode 30) and Capt. Josiah Perry in "The Martinet" (episode 83).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Clegg Hoyt

Clegg Hoyt was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 85 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He had minor parts in a few films, including the romantic comedy "That Touch of Mink" (1962), starring Cary Grant and Doris Day, and the mystery drama "In the Heat of the Night" (1967), starring Sidney Poitier, Rod Steiger, Warren Oates and Lee Grant.

Hoyt guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968).  He also had a recurring role as Mac in six episodes of the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966).

Hoyt made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lester Chard in "The Horse Traders" (episode 60).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.  He appeared in eight episodes of "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and he made multiple appearances in "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

William "Billy" Hughes

William "Billy" Hughes, born William Eugene Hughes, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  Both his father Bill, Sr. and his uncle Whitey were stuntmen.  He appeared in 25 movies and television shows during a two-decade career, which began when he was barely ten playing an uncredited role in the Mickey Rooney crime comedy "The Nice Little Bank That Should Be Robbed" (1958).  He played the leading role as a runaway in the western "Ole Rex" (1961) and portrayed the oldest sibling Joe in a family of orphans in the Debbie Reynolds comedy "My Six Loves (1963).  Toward the end of his career, he had an uncredited stunt role in the Sam Peckinpah film "The Wild Bunch" (1969), and in his final film role, he appeared in the obscure western drama "Smoke in the Wind" (1975).

Hughes guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).

As a young teenager, Hughes made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Aaron in "Day of Reckoning" (episode 71), Jeffrey Waller in "The Long Gun from Tuscon" (episode 121) and Gridley Maule in "The Sidewinder" (episode 158).  Reportedly, the part he played in "The Sidewinder" was one of his favorite roles.  He guest-starred in several other westerns, sometimes making multiple appearances, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Whitey Hughes

Whitey Hughes, born Robert James Hughes, was an American stunt actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 50 years.  He was raised on a farm, where he learned how to drive teams and break horses.  He became a Screen Actors Guild member in 1947.  He was one of the smallest stuntmen in Hollywood, often doubling for women, including leading ladies Rita Hayworth, Stephanie Powers, Barbara Hershey, Anne Baxter, Lana Turner, Kathleen Crowley and Virginia Mayo.  Although primarily a stuntman, he did have many minor speaking parts.

Hughes provided stunt work for several films, including the drama "The Wild One" (1953), starring Marlon Brando; the film adaptation of the Edna Ferber novel "Giant" (1956), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean; the iconic sci-fi film "The Planet of the Apes" (1968), starring Charlton Heston and Roddy McDowall, as well as its sequels.  He also was a stuntman on the comedy-drama "The Stunt Man" (1980), starring Peter O'Toole, Steve Railsback and Barbara Hershey; and the action comedy "Men in Black" (1997), starring Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith.   In television, Hughes coordinated stunt work for four consecutive seasons of the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).  He also provided stunts for "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983) and the Aaron Spelling fantasy series "Fantasy Island" (1978–1984).

Hughes was Johnny Crawford's double for four years on THE RIFLEMAN.  His professional relationship with the show's producers garnered him assignments as a stunt actor on "Geronimo" (1961), starring Chuck Connors in the title role, and in Sam Peckinpah's westerns "The Wild Bunch" (1969), in which his son Billy Hughes also appeared as an uncredited stuntman, and "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973).

Arthur Hunnicutt

Arthur Hunnicutt was an American stage, film and television actor who appeared in 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He attended Arkansas State Teachers College, but left before graduating for lack of funds.  He eventually made his way to New York, where he soon began performing on Broadway.  In stage productions, he established a persona for which he would be typecast, playing grizzled country characters.  He played Davy Crockett in the historical western "The Last Command" (1955) and co-starred with Marjorie Main ("Ma" Kettle), playing Sedgewick "Pa" Kettle in "The Kettles of the Ozarks" (1955).  He received an Oscar nomination in the category of "Best Supporting Actor" for his role as Zeb Calloway in the western "The Big Sky" (1952), in which he appeared opposite Kirk Douglas.  Among his other notable films roles were his portrayal of Mitt Duffield in the western "Broken Arrow" (1950), starring James Stewart; Bill Porter in the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy, Bill Mauldin and Douglas Dick; Wade Carlton in the adventure film "Harry and Tonto" (1974), starring Art Carney; and Uncle Jesse Hags in the action film "The Moonrunners" (1975), in which he co-starred with James Mitchum and Kiel Martin.

Hunnicut guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the crime drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975).

Hunnicutt made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nathaniel Cameron in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.  In his later years, Hunnicutt served as the honorary mayor of Northridge, California.

Jim Hurst

Jim Hurst appeared in six television shows in five years.  He guest-starred in the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sylvester in "Woman From Hog Ridge" (episode 78).  He guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Bronco" (1958–1962), starring Ty Hardin; "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury; and "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.

Josphine Hutchinson

Josephine Hutchinson was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 60 years.  She made her film debut as a teenager in the silent film adaptation of "The Little Princess" (1917), starring Mary Pickford.  She attended the Cornish School of Music and Drama in Seattle, then moved to New York to work in theater.  Meanwhile, she succeeded in making the transition from silent films to talkies.  She signed a contract with Warner Bros. and relocated to Hollywood, where she made her second film debut as Joan Bradford in the romantic musical "Happiness Ahead" (1934), in which she appeared opposite Dick Powell.  She spent most of her career playing supporting roles; although, among her more memorable screen characters were Elsa von Frankenstein in the sci-fi horror "Son of Frankenstein" (1939), starring Boris Karloff, Basil Rathbone, Bela Lugosi and Lionel Atwill; Mrs. Townsend in the Alfred Hitchcock thriller "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason; and Mrs. Elvira McCanles in the western "Nevada Smith" (1966), starring Steve McQueen.  She also guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime dramas "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973) and the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).

Hutchinson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Christine St. John in "The Prodigal" (episode 71).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Brian G. Hutton

Brian Hutton was an American film and television actor, as well as director.  He appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows and directed nine films during a two-decade career.  He made his directorial debut with "The Wild Seed" (1965), starring Michael Parkins and Celia Kaye.  His most notable films include the World War II thriller "Where the Eagles Dare" (1968), starring Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood; the war comedy "Kelly's Heroes" (1970), starring Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Don Rickles and Carroll O'Connor; the psychological drama about a romantic triangle "X, Y, and Zee" (1972) starring Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Caine and Susannah York; and the romantic adventure "High Road to China" (1983), starring Tom Selleck and Bess Armstrong.

Hutton also had acting roles in a few films, including the western "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" (1957), starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas, and the western "Last Train to Gun Hill" (1959), starring Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn and Carolyn Jones.  In addition to film, Hutton guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962).  Hutton made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Deecie in "Long Gun from Tuscon" (episode 121) and Billy Benson in "Obituary" (episode 44).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; and "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller.  He also had an uncredited part in "Geronimo" (1962), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors in the title role.

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Rex Ingram

Rex Ingram was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  In 1919, Ingram graduated from the Northwestern University medical school.  He was the first African American man to receive a Phi Beta Kappa key from Northwestern University.  In 1929, he made his debut on Broadway, appearing in the original cast in the productions "Haiti" (1938), "Cabin in the Sky" (1940) and "St. Louis Woman" (1946).  In 1962, he became the first African American actor be hired for a contract role in a soap opera when he was cast in "The Brighter Day" (1954–1962).

Ingram's film credits include the role of God in the drama "The Green Pastures" (1960) and the Devil in "Cabin in the Sky" (1943); Tilney in the romantic comedy "The Talk of the Town" (1942), starring Cary Grant, Jean Arthur and Ronald Colman; Sgt. Major Tambul in the war drama "Sahara" (1943), starring Humphrey Bogart; and a minor part in the drama "Elmer Gantry" (1960), starring Burt Lancaster, Jean Simmons and Shirley Jones.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968) and the comedy series "The Bill Cosby Show" (1969–1971).  Ingram made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Thaddeus in "Closer than a Brother" (episode 98).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

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Sherry Jackson

Sherry Jackson is an American actress and former child star who had a prolific career spanning three decades, mostly in television.  She made her film debut at age seven in the 1949 musical "You're My Everything," starring Anne Baxter.  She is probably best remembered for her role as Terry Williams (appearing from 1953 to 1958) on "The Danny Thomas Show."  Jackson appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Rebecca Snipe "The Sister" (episode 9).

Jackson blossomed from child star into a curvaceous beauty.  She appeared in a number of low-budget films, including "Gunn" (1967) and "The Mini-Skirt Mob" (1968) and continued to work in television in the 1960's through 1980, including appearances in episodes of "Batman" (1966), "Lost in Space" (1965), "Star Trek" (1966), "The Wild Wild West" (1965), "Barnaby Jones" (1978), a starring turn in "Brenda Starr, Reporter" (1979), and "Charlie's Angels" (1980).  Fans of the original "Star Trek" will recognize her as the sexually appealing android Andrea in the 1966 episode, "What are Little Girls Made Of."

Enid Janes/Jaynes

Janes/Jaynes made six guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, twice in two-part stories.  She appeared as Amy Barker in "Panic" (episode 47), Aggie in "The Wyoming Story, Parts I and II" (episodes 96 and 97), as Abbey Striker in "Quiet Fear" (episode 127), and the Pregnant Woman in "Waste, Parts I and II" (episodes 143 and 144).  She later appeared with Chuck Connors in "Geronimo" (1962) as Huera.  Jaynes was wife of THE RIFLEMAN producer Jules V. Levy.

Paul Jasmin

Paul Jasmin is an American film and television actor, as well as fashion designer and photographer.  He has appeared in 11 movies and television shows in nearly 50 years.  His work as a photographer has been featured in "Vogue" and other high-profile fashion magazines.  He provided the voice for Norma Bates in the horror film "Psycho" (1960), although his work went uncredited.  He has had several other film roles, including minor parts in the drama "Midnight Cowboy" (1969), starring Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight; the comedy "Adaptation" (2002), starring Nicolas Cage, Meryl Streep and Chris Cooper; in addition to the role of Baron Jasmin in the historical drama "Marie Antoinette" (2006), starring Kirsten Dunst and Jason Schwartzman.

Jasmin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Allison Mitchell in "The Legacy" (episode 51).  He guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian.

Dal Jenkins

Dal Jenkins appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows during a two-decade career.  He had a small number of film roles, including Sambo in the western "Will Penny" (1968), starring Charlton Heston, Joan Hackett and Donald Pleasance; and minor parts in the George Stevens biblical epic "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965), starring Max von Sydow, Dorothy McGuire and Charlton Heston leading an ensemble cast, and the comedy crime caper "Pushing Up Daisies" (1963).  He also guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968) and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Smiley in "Requiem at Mission Springs" (episode 164).  He guest-starred in several other popular westerns of 1950s and 60s, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Harvey Johnson

Harvey Johnson appeared in 11 movies and television shows in about as many years.  He had minor parts in the Bud Yorkin comedies "Come Blow Your Horn" (1963), starring Frank Sinatra, and "Divorce American Style" (1967), starring Dick Van Dyke, Debbie Reynolds and Jason Robards.  He also guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1960s and 70s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), created by Blake Edwards and starring Craig Stevens, Herschel Bernardi and Lola Albright, and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray and Don Grady.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nooley Stark in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77).  He also guest-starred in the western "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner.

Chubby Johnson

Chubby Johnson, born Charles Rutledge Johnson, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning 25 years.  Prior to becoming an actor relatively late in life—in his 40s—Johnson worked as a journalist and radio announcer.  He became a recognizable character actor, known for his jovial disposition and folksy country accent, which made him well-suited to the western genre.  He had several film roles, including Cap'n Mello in the western "Bend of the River" (1952), starring James Stewart, Julie Adams and Rock Hudson, as well as a minor part in the western "High Noon" (1952), starring Gary Cooper.

Johnson guest-starred in several popular television series of the 1950s through the 70s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).  He also had a few recurring roles, playing Jim Bell in the western "Sky King" (1951–1959) and Buzz the Salvage Man in the family comedy "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963).

Johnson made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Kansas Sawyer in "The Horse Traders" (episode 60), Mr. Avery in "The Spoiler" (episode 61) and the old man in "Guilty Conscience" (episode 137).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; awhide; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Jason Johnson

Jason Johnson was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 30 years.  He had several film roles, including Dr. Benedict in the Michael Crichton medical thriller "The Andromeda Strain" (1971), starring Arthur Hill, James Olson and Kate Reid; as well as minor parts in the biographical drama "I Want to Live!" (1958), starring Susan Hayward; and the drama "Valley of the Dolls" (1967), starring Barbara Perkins, Patty Duke and Sharon Tate.  He also guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1975) and "The Waltons" (1971–1981), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968) and the espionage thriller "Mission Impossible" (1966–1973).

Johnson made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cramer in "The Dead-Eye Kid" (episode 20) and Bert Sanderson in "Money Gun" (episode 33).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Isaac Stanford Jolley

Isaac Stanford Jolley, Sr. was a prolific American character actor of radio, stage, film and television.  He appeared in 365 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  As a child, he toured with his father's traveling circus.  Perhaps as a result, he began his acting career in vaudeville and stock theater.  Eventually he made it to Broadway, debuting on the stage opposite Charles Trowbridge in "Sweet Seventeen" (1924).  During this period, he also worked in radio; however, it would not be until 1935 that Jolley found his way to Hollywood.  Once there, he began refining his villainous personae, enhanced by his slim profile and pencil-thin mustache.  For much of his career, he worked for B-tier companies, including Monogram and PRC.

Jolley had numerous film roles, most of them uncredited, including Professor Bryant in the sci-fi action B-movie "King of the Rocket Men" (1949), starring Mae Clarke; Houston in the drama "The Long, Hot Summer" (1958), starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Franciosa; and the dispatcher in the sci-fi horror film "Night of the Lepus" (1972), starring Stuart Whitman, Janet Leigh and Rory Calhoun; as well as minor parts in the drama "A Star Is Born" (1937), starring Janet Gaynor and Fredric March; the biographical drama "Joan of Arc" (1948), starring Ingrid Bergman; the war drama "Sands of Iwo Jima" (1949), starring John Wayne; the musical "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954), starring Jane Powell and Howard Keel; and the musical "White Christmas" (1954), starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Rosemary Clooney.

Jolley guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1975), the Disney anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).

Jolley made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe in "Hostages to Fortune" (episode 160).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Annie Oakley" (1954–1957), starring Gail Davis; "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1955); "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), starring Duncan Renaldo and Leo Carillo; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.  Jolley also appeared in "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors, and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, the latter also a production of Levy-Gardner-Laven and Four Star.

Gordon Jones

Gordon Jones was an American film and television actor whose career spanned more than 30 years.  Born in California, he broke into the movie business playing small roles and bit parts.  A big burly man, he played supporting characters, often appearing in slapstick roles and light comedies, even developing something of a reputation as a comical sidekick in the B-western genre.

His acting turn co-starring Eddie Cantor in "Strike Me Pink" (1936) garnered him a contract with RKO.  He appeared in a string of films in the 1930's and '40's.  He was cast against type as Britt Reid, the title character of "The Green Hornet" (1940) in the first of two Universal movie serials based on the old radio program.  Ironically, it was "The Green Hornet" role for which Jones is best remembered.  In the same year, Jones played the leading role of a rookie police officer in "I Take This Oath."

After serving a tour of duty in the military during World War II, Gordon returned to acting.  He played comic western villains in a succession of films, including the Danny Kaye classic "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" (1947), the Abbott and Costello western send-up, "The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap" (1947), and the "horse and bull" western, "The Untamed Breed" (1948).  He went on to play Mike the Cop, Lou Costello's nemesis, on "The Abbott and Costello Show" (1952–1954).

Gordon appeared other television series in the 1950's and early 60's, including "The Real McCoys," and he appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the Carnival Barker in "The Wronged Man" (episode 27) and Vince Medford in "Stopover" (episode 107).

Jones continued to work in films; notably, he appeared in two successful Disney pictures, "The Absent-Minded Professor" and "Son of Flubber," in which he portraying harried school coaches.  His last film role was in John Wayne's western-comedy "McClintock!" (1963).

L. Q. Jones

L. Q. Jones, born Justus Ellis McQueen Jr., is an American film and television actor, as well as a director.  He has appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows during a career spanning 50 years.  He adopted his stage name from the first role he played in film and was a member of film director Sam Peckinpah's stock company of actors.  He directed the sci-fi cult classic "A Boy and His Dog" (1975), starring Don Johnson and Jason Robards.  In 2003, he was honored at the Silver Spur Awards.

Jones has had roles in several memorable films, including a minor part in the war drama "The Young Lions" (1958), starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin; Supply Sgt. Frazer in the war drama "Hell Is for Heroes" (1962), starring Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin and Fess Parker; Loomis in the Ted Post western "Hang 'Em High" (1968), starring Clint Eastwood; Black Harris in the Sam Peckinpah western "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973), starring James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson; Pat Webb in the Martin Scorsese classic "Casino" (1995), starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone and Joe Pesci; and Three-Fingered Jack in the action adventure film "The Mask of Zorro" (1998), starring Antonio Banderas and Anthony Hopkins.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1975), the road adventure "Route 66" (1960–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the western action adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975) and the police drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975).

Jones made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charley Breen in "Day of Reckoning" (episode 138).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Warner Jones

Warner Jones appeared in six television shows in four years.  He had recurring roles as Capt. Wilbur Scott in the adventure series "The Blue Angels" (1960–1961) and Henry McGill in the comedy series "Window on Main Street" (1961–1962).  He also guest-starred in the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968).  Jones made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fred Tate in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68).

Bill Joyce

William "Bill" Joyce was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows during a career spanning 45 years.  Following his service in the United States Army, Joyce began performing on Broadway, appearing in various productions, including "Damn Yankees" and "Bye Bye Birdie."  He had several film roles, including the leading role of Tom Harris in the horror B-movie "I Eat Your Skin" (1964) and Senator Charles in the thriller "Parallax View" (1974), starring Warren Beatty; as well as a minor part in the biographical drama "The Wings of Eagles" (1957), starring John Wayne.  He also guest-starred in the soap opera "Days of Our Lives" (1965– ).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clay Barker in "Panic" (episode 47).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone.

Katy Jurado

Katy Jurado was born Maria Cristina Estela Marcela Jurado Garcia, in Guadalajara, Jalisco.  She was the first Mexican actress to be nominated for an Academy Award.  She began acting in Mexican films after divorcing her husband in 1943, appearing in "No Mataras" opposite the well-known Mexican actor Pedro Infante.  Jurado's performance brought her fame.  Discovered by John Wayne, she was introduced to American audiences with "The Bullfighter and the Lady" (1951) and went on to appear in many Hollywood movies.  In 1952, she starred in "High Noon," for which she earned a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress.  During the 1950's and 1960's, Jurado appeared in several Hollywood productions, including "Arrowhead" (1953), "Broken Lance" (1954), for which she received an Academy Award nomination.  Jurado also appeared in "The Racers" (1955), "Trial" (1955), "Trapeze" (1956), "The Badlanders" (1958), "One-Eyed Jacks" (1961), "Barabbas" (1961), "Stay Away, Joe" (1968), "Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid" (1973), "The Children of Sanchez" (1978) and "Under the Volcano" (1984).  Her last film performance was in the Mexican film, "Un Secreto de Esperanza" (2002).  Jurado appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Julia/Big Anna in "The Boarding House" (episode 22), which was directed by Sam Peckinpah.

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Beatrice Kay

Beatrice Kay was an American stage, radio, film and television actress, as well as a singer.  She appeared in nearly 20 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  She began acting in stock theater as a child, eventually going on to perform on the Broadway stage.  She hosted her own radio show during the early 1940s.  She was also a popular recording artist, known for "Mention My Name in Sheboygan" and "The Strawberry Blond."  She made her film debut as Claire Williams in the musical "Diamond Horseshoe" (1945), starring Betty Grable and Phil Silvers.  She had a few other film roles, including Sandy in the crime drama "Underworld U.S.A." (1961), also starring Cliff Robertson and Dolores Dorn.

Kay guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and the anthology series "Rod Serling's Night Gallery" (1969–1972).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Goldie Drain in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).  She also guest-starred in the western "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Richard Keene

Richard "Dick" Keene was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He appeared in numerous films, mostly in minor or uncredited roles, including Mac in the musical comedy "High Society" (1956), starring Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra; a producer in "The Great Gatsby" (1949); the royal cook in "Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" (1949); as well as minor parts in the musical comedy "road" pictures starring Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour, including "Road to Singapore" (1940), "Road to Zanzibar" (1941) and "Road to Bali" (1952); the romantic comedy "My Favorite Brunette" (1948), starring Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour; and the musical "White Christmas" (1954), starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye and Rosemary Clooney.  Keene guest-starred in a handful of popular television shows, including the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960); the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Jethroe in "The Hero" (episode 59).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Mike Kellin

Myron "Mike" Kellin was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He attended Boston University and Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.  He then served as a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy during World War II.  After the war ended, Kellin resumed his studies, this time pursuing his interest in acting and playwrighting at the Yale School of Drama.  In 1949, Kellin made his Broadway debut in "At War with the Army."  In 1956, he received a Tony nomination for his performance in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Pipe Dream" (1955).  He also received an Obie award for his performance in the David Marnet drama "American Buffalo" (1975).

Kellin had roles in several memorable films, including Pvt. Kolinsky in the war drama "Hell Is for Heroes" (1962), starring Steve McQueen, Bobby Darin and Fess Parker; Julian Soshnick in the crime drama "The Boston Strangler" (1968), starring Tony Curtis, Henry Fonda and George Kennedy; Mr. Hayes in the biographical drama "Midnight Express" (1978), starring Brad Davis, Irene Miracle and Bo Hopkins; and a leading role as Mel in the horror film "Sleepaway Camp" (1983), also starring Katherine Kamhi and Paul DeAngelo.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the road adventure "Route 66" (1960–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the war drama "Combat" (1962–1967).  Kellin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Len Sommers in "The Surveyors" (episode 54).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; and Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Ray Kellogg

Ray Kellogg was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He had roles in several memorable films, including a minor part in the adventure comedy "The Court Jester" (1956), starring Danny Kaye, Glynis Johns, Basil Rathbone and Angela Lansbury; and Harry Joseph in the musical comedy "The Music Man" (1962), starring Robert Preston, Shirley Jones and Buddy Hackett.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the classic family sitcom "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the Lloyd Bridges adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the classic family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the macabre family comedy "The Addams Family" (1964–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the variety show "The Red Skelton Hour" (1951–1971).

Kellogg made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Vale Cornton in "Incident at Line Shack 6" (episode 156).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; and "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda.

Bill Kendis

William "Bill" Kendis was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows during a decade-long career.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), the classic family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the comedy series "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970).  Kendis made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Stark in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  He also guest-starred in the western Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Douglas Kennedy

Douglas Kennedy, born Douglas Richards Kennedy, was an American character actor of film and television.  He appeared in nearly 200 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 35 years.  He was under contract to Paramount Pictures and later Warner Bros., but put his career on hold to serve as a major in the Signal Corps with the OSS and the Army Intelligence during World War II.  Upon returning and embarking on an acting career, he appeared in numerous thrillers and westerns, typically typecast as villains and, conversely, in westerns, as territorial marshals.  Kennedy was tall, handsome and ruggedly built, but instead of playing the leading man, his film roles were usually minor parts, including a hotel clerk in the crime thriller "The Mad Doctor" (1941), starring Basil Rathbone; a reporter in the crime drama "Strange Alibi" (1941), starring Arthur Kennedy; a horse show announcer in "Stallion Road" (1947), starring Ronald Reagan; and the voice of a radio concert broadcaster in the film adaptation of Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead" (1949), starring Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal.

Kennedy guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s, 60s and 70s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  He also had a few recurring roles, including the title character in the short-lived western series "Steve Donovan, Western Marshal" (1955), Sgt. Fred Coombs in the crime drama "Code 3" (1957), Manuel in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959) and Sheriff Fred Madden in the western "The Big Valley" (1965–1969).  In 1973, he guest-starred in several episodes of "Hawaii 5–0 " (1968–1980), which were his last television appearances prior to his death.  Kennedy made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pete Crandell in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Don Kennedy

Donald "Don" Kennedy is an American actor who has worked primarily in radio and television.  He has appeared in 100 movies and television shows during his 60-year career, beginning as a radio announcer during the 1940s.  He was a contributor to NBC's "Monitor" radio show in the 50s, developing several characters.  He currently hosts "Big Band Jump," an internationally syndicated radio show devoted to music from the Big Band era.  Kennedy has received various honors for his work, including the Silver Circle Award, two Emmy awards, and awards from Pioneer Broadcaster and Georgia Broadcaster's Hall of Fame.

Kennedy's few film roles include Dan in "Spring Affair" (1960), starring C. Lindsay Workman, Merry Anders and Yvonne White; Charlie Tucker in "Hud" (1963), starring Paul Newman; a lineman in "The Stunt Man" (1980), starring Peter O'Toole and Barbara Hershey.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), and the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967).  He also had a recurring role, providing the voice for Tansut, in the animated sci-fi series "Space Ghost Coast to Coast" (1994–2004).

Kennedy made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clyde in "Home Ranch" (episode 2) and Ed the stagecoach driver in "Legacy" (episode 51).  He guest-starred in many other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "My Friend Flicka" (1955–1958), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).

Sandy Kenyon

Sandy Kenyon, born Sanford Klein, was an American voice and character actor of stage, film and television.  He appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows during his 55-year career.  He had very distinctive features, including a gaunt appearance and prominent cheek bones.  Prior to embarking on his career as an actor, he served in the Army Air Corps as a pilot during World War II.  He had several film roles, including Bones Corelli in the biographical crime drama "Al Capone" (1959), and a real estate agent in the romantic drama "Breezy" (1973), starring William Holden and Kay Lenz.  He also had several recurring roles on television, including Des Smith in the short-lived series "Crunch and Des" (1955), Shep Baggott in the western "The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters" (1963–1964), the voice of John Arbuckle in the animated series "Here Comes Garfield" (1982) and Reverend Kathrun in the primetime soap "Knots Landing" (1979–1993).

Kenyon guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the western adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), the satirical comedy " M*A*S*H" (1972–1983), the long-running family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedies "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (1961–1966) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the comedy series "That Girl" (1966–1971) and the war comedy "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971), as well as the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "Ironside" (1967–1975), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), "Mannix" (1967–1975) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975).  Kenyon made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jim Profit in "Mail Order Groom" (episode 56).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Richard Kiel

Richard Kiel, born Richard Dawson Kiel, is an American character actor of television and film, as well as an author.  He has appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  He held various odd jobs prior to becoming an actor, including night club bouncer and cemetery plot salesman.  Standing an imposing 7' 1.5" in height, throughout his career, he has been cast in roles specifically because of his physically intimidating stature and heavy features, which were caused by acromegaly, a metabolic disorder.  He has played brutish villains in numerous films, including the character Solarite in the sci-fi B-movie "The Phantom Planet" (1961), starring Dean Fredericks; Samson in the crime comedy "The Longest Yard" (1974), starring Burt Reynolds; Reace in "Silver Streak" (1976), starring Gene Wilder, Richard Pryor and Jill Clayburgh; Club in the western "Pale Rider" (1985), starring Clint Eastwood; and the voice of Vlad in the Disney animated comedy "Tangled" (2010);  however, he is best known for his role as Jaws in the James Bond films "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) and "Moonraker" (1979), as well as Mr. Larson in "Happy Gilmore" (1996).  In 2003, he reprised his role as Jaws and lent his voice to the James Bond video game "James Bond 007: Everything or Nothing."

Kiel has guest-starred in various popular television shows of the 1960s, 70s and 80s, including Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the comedy series "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1967), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Kolchak: The Night Stalker" (1974–1975).  He also has had a few recurring roles, including Voltaire in the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and Moose Moran in the western comedy "Barbary Coast" (1975–1976).  Kiel made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cousin Carl Hazlett in "The Decision" (episode 116).  He also guest-starred in the western series "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  In addition to acting, he wrote and produced the family drama "The Giant of Thunder Mountain" (1991).  In 2002, Kiel also published his autobiography, "Making It Big in the Movies."

Kip King

Kip King, born Jerome C. Kattan, was an American film, television and voice actor, as well as a comedian.  He appeared in 85 movies and television shows during his 55-year career.  His son Chris Kattan is also a comedian, best known for his stint on "Saturday Night Live" from 1995 to 2003.  Both Kattans were members of The Groundlings comedy troupe—the elder Kattan was one of the founders.  His career began during the waning days of the studio system, which gave him the opportunity to work with Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn, Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Lana Turner, and comedy legends Jack Benny, Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Stan Laurel, who gave him advice.  King guest-starred in many TV popular shows, beginning in the Golden Age of television in the 1950s and into the 2000s.  His credits include appearances in the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), the comedy series "One Day at a Time" (1975–1984), the action series "The Fall Guy" (1981–1986), and the crime comedy "Reno 911!" (2003–2009), as well as the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Mannix" (1967–1975).  He also had a recurring role as Ronald Sandler in the comedy series "Charlie & Co." (1985–1986).  King made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Don Mahoney in "The Dead-Eye Kid" (episode 20).

Lee Kinsolving

Lee Kinsolving, born Arthur Lee Kinsolving Jr., was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 20 movies and television shows during his brief career.  He studied acting under Mary Welch, a member of the famed Actors Studio in New York.  Following a brief stint on Broadway, Kinsolving was signed by the agent Richard Clayton, who guided James Dean and Tab Hunter in their rise to stardom.  Despite his initial success in Hollywood, Kinsolving became disenchanted with the industry and left to pursue other interests.  He had a few film roles, including Pvt. Dean in the war drama "All the Young Men" (1960), starring Alan Ladd, and Sammy Golden in the drama "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" (1960), starring Robert Preston.

Kinsolving guest-starred in several popular shows of the 1960s, including the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the off-beat anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965) and the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tom Elder in "Boomerang" (episode 39).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

James Kirkwood (Sr.)

James Kirkwood, Sr. was an American actor and director whose career began during the silent film era.  He appeared in nearly 250 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  Beginning in 1909, he worked frequently with silent film legends D.W. Griffith and Mary Pickford, and although his career as a director ended before the advent of the talkies, he continued acting well into the 1950s.  He had numerous film roles, including the leading role as Guy Watson in the romantic drama "The Wise Guy" (1926), also starring Mary Astor and Betty Compson; Roger Norton in the romantic drama "She Wanted a Milionaire" (1932), starring Joan Bennett and Spencer Tracy; and an uncredited role as a board member in the biographical drama "Madame Curie" (1943), starring Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon.  Kirkwood made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the colonel in "The Horse Traders" (episode 60).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, and "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), starring Duncan Renaldo and Leo Carillo.

Robert Knapp

Robert Knapp was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows during his 25-year career.   Interested in the entertainment industry at an early age, he quit school at age 17 and got a job as a messenger at Warner Bros.  He succeeded in attaching himself to producer/second assistant director Irving Asher's unit, and after entering military service, spent two years with the same unit in Sri Lanka (Ceylon) making training films.  He returned to Warner Bros. after he was discharged and worked in publicity, but eventually he became a second assistant director.  His acting career was launched when he was spotted by an agent at the Biltmore Theater, where he was co-starring with Mary Boland and Charles Ruggles in "One Fine Day."  Knapp's film debut was in "Rogue River" (1949), starring Rory Calhoun and Peter Graves.  Some of his other film credits include "Mesa of Lost Women" (1953), "Scandal, Inc." (1956), "Revolt at Fort Laramie" (1957), and "Rawhide Trail" (1958).  A year earlier, in 1957, he appeared in "Tomahawk Trail" (1957), playing Pvt. Barrow opposite Chuck Connors' Sgt. Wade McCoy.

In the late 1950s/early 60s, Knapp segued into television.  He guest-starred in many popular TV shows, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" and "Dragnet 1967" (1951–1959 and 1967–1970), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Adam-12" (1968–1975) and "The F.B.I." (1965–1974), as well as the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961) and the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966).  He also had a recurring role as Ben Olson in the daytime drama "Days of Our Lives" (1965–present).

Knapp made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dan Hewitt in "A Time for Singing" (episode 64).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), starring Lee Aaker and James Brown, "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Martin Kosleck

Martin Kosleck, born Nicolaie Yoshkin, was a German stage, television and film actor.  He appeared in nearly 90 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 50 years.  Having fled Germany when the Nazis came to power, Kosleck made a career of portraying villainous Nazis.  Prior to leaving Germany, Kosleck attended the Mac Reinhardt Dramatic School, gaining attention for his performance in Shakespearean roles.  After moving to America, he began speaking out against Nazism and was placed on the Gestapo's list of "undesirables."  He is best remembered for his varied but consistently vile portrayals of the Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels.  His impressions are featured in the films "Confessions of a Nazi Spy" (1939), starring Edward G. Robinson, "The Hitler Gang" (1944), starring Bobby Watson, and "Hitler" (1962), starring Richard Basehart.  He also played the role of Tramp in Alfred Hitchcock's mystery romance "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), starring Joel McCrea and Laraine Day.

Kosleck guest-starred in several popular TV shows of the 1960s, including the sci-fi anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the Buck Henry comedy espionage spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), starring Don Adams and Barbara Feldon, the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), starring Adam West, the western action series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), starring Robert Conrad and Ross Martin, the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves heading an ensemble cast, and the adventure series "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), starring Robert Wagner.  Kosleck made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe Stanic in "Old Tony" (episode 168), which was the last episode of the series.

Berry Kroeger

Berry Kroeger was an American radio, stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 90 movies and television shows during his 40-year career.  He was typecast as a shady villain, which made him well-suited for the B-movie circuit.  He had many notable film roles, including Alexandre Dumas, Sr. in the mystery drama "Black Magic" (1949), starring Orson Welles; Packett in the crime drama "Gun Crazy" (1950), starring Peggy Cummins and John Dall; Hugo Baumer in the crime drama "Seven Thieves" (1960), starring Edward G. Robinson and Rod Steiger; and Petrosian in the sci-fi horror "Demon Seed" (1977), starring Julie Christie.

Kroeger guest-starred in many popular TV shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), "The Chevy Chase Mystery Show" (1960), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the Buck Henry espionage spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970) and the sophisticated adventure crime series "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), as well as the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Kroeger made many appearances in several anthology series of the 1950s, including "Studio One in Hollywood" (1948–1958), "Four Star Playhouse" (1952–1956), "Hallmark Hall of Fame" (1952–1955), and "Alcoa Theatre" (1957–1960).  Kroeger made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ansel Bain in "Closer than a Brother" (episode 98).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Jack Kruschen

Jack Kruschen was a Canadian actor whose career began on stage, but he became a character actor in both movies and television.  In his 50-year career, with more than 200 screen credits, he played virtually every kind of role.  Often cast in comedic ethnic roles, Kruschen occasionally landed a role as a villain, but more often was cast as the volatile, emotional Italian or Jewish neighbor patriarch.  He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in "The Apartment" (1960).  Kruschen appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the Clyde Bailey in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17), Sammy in "One Went to Denver" (episode 25).  He was one of six actors to play Doc Burrage, appearing in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77) and "Baranca" (episode 82).

Kay E. Kuter

Kay E. Kuter, born Kay Edwin Emmert Kuter, was an American actor who worked in film, stage and television.  His filmography lists more than 120 movies and television credits in a career spanning 50 years.  Born into a show business family, his father was pioneer art director Leo "K" Kuter and his mother was silent screen actress Evelyn Edler.  After he graduated from Carnegie Mellon University, Kuter began acting and directed more than 50 plays.  He was typecast as a heavy and was known for his distinctive beard.  He guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the action series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the family comedy "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), the western adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the sci-fi series "Star Trek: The Next Generation" (1987–1994).  He also had a recurring role as Newt Kiley in the comedy series "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970) and "Green Acres" (1965–1970).  Kuter also worked as a voice actor, and among his many roles, provided the voices for Grimsby in "The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea" (2000); Griswold Goodsoup and Dockmaster Velasco in the acclaimed adventure games "The Curse of Monkey Island" (1997) and "Grim Fandango" (1998), respectively.

Kuter made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Rafe Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70) and Chavre Banner in "The Lonesome Bride" (episode 108).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

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Charles La Franchise

Charlie La Franchise made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the regular character of Eddie Halstead, former owner of Madera House, who sells his business to the new owner played by Patricia Blair in the title role as "Lou Mallory" (episode 145).  Previously, La Franchise performed in a children's television show, playing "Uncle Charlie" on Portland, Oregon station KPTV.

Jack Lambert

Jack Lambert was an American character actor of stage, film and television who specialized in portraying tough guys and heavies.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He had many roles in classic films, including Jacques in the war drama "The Cross of Lorraine" (1943), starring Jean-Pierre Aumont and Gene Kelly; "Dum-Dum" Clarke in the crime drama "The Killers" (1946), starring Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner; Philadelphia Tom Zaca in the crime drama "The Enforcer" (1951), starring Humphrey Bogart and Zero Mostel; Red in the western "Bend of the River" (1952), starring James Stewart, Julia Adams and Rock Hudson; and Howard in the biographical action film "Machine-Gun Kelly" (1958), starring Charles Bronson.  Lambert is perhaps best-remembered for his role as Steve "the Claw" Michael in "Dick Tracy's Dilemma" (1947), starring Ralph Byrd.

He guest-starred in many TV shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the Buck Henry comedy spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), and the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "Dragnet" (1951–1959).  He had a recurring role as Joshua Walcek in the adventure series "Riverboat" (1959–1961).  Lambert made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Lance in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Martin Landau

Martin Landau appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Miguel, the Patron, in "The Vacqueros" (episode 111).  He also co-starred with Chuck Connors in "Branded" (1965-1966), in "This Stage of Fools."  Landau had a long career in television and later, in film.  He attended Lee Strasberg's Actor's Studio and made his film debut in Alfred Hitchcock's "North by Northwest."  He is perhaps best-remembered for his role as mission specialist Rollin Hand in "Mission Impossible," for which he received two Emmy nominations (1968 and 1969) and won a Golden Globe in 1969.  He later appeared in the television series "Space: 1999."  Landau received two Oscar nominations for his roles in "Tucker: The Man and His Dream," co-starring Jeff Bridges, and the Woody Allen film "Crimes and Misdemeanors," co-starring Angelica Huston.  He won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 1994 for his portrayal of Bela Lugosi in "Ed Wood."

Michael Landon

Michael Landon was an American actor, writer, director and producer, whose prolific career spanned 35 years.  He appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Will Fulton in "End of a Young Gun" (episode 3) and Billy Mathis in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  Over three decades, he went on to star in three popular NBC TV series.  He is widely known for his roles as Little Joe Cartwright in "Bonanza," Charlie Ingalls in "Little House on the Prairie," and Jonathan Smith in "Highway to Heaven."  Landon was nominated for a Golden Globe award in 1979 for his role in "Little House on the Prairie."  He produced, wrote and directed many of the series' episodes, including the short-lived production, "Father Murphy," which starred his friend and "Little House" co-star Merlin Olsen.  In 1976, Landon wrote and directed an autobiographical movie, "The Loneliest Runner," and was nominated for two Emmys.  He also hosted the annual long-running NBC coverage of the "Tournament of Roses Parade" with Kelly Lange. The Western Writers of America honored Landon with a Bronze Wrangler Award in 1971 for "Bonanza" and again in 1981, with a Spur Award for Best Script for "May We Make Them Proud," a 1974 episode of "Little House on the Prairie."

John Larch

John Larch was a prolific American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 160 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 35 years.  He had a leading role in the radio serial "Captain Starr of Space" (1953–1954), after which he segued into film and television.  In television, he proved to be a versatile actor, guest-starring in genres ranging from action adverntures to family dramas, including the historical drama "You Are There" (1953–1957), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the medical dramas "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966) and "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967, the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the action series "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981), the long-running family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), and the action comedy series "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979–1985), as well as the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Police Story" (1973–1977), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977) and "Ironside" (1967–1975).

Larch played several recurring roles, including Lt. Michaels in the crime drama "The Walter Winchell File" (1957–1958), Deputy DA Jerry Miller in the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), Gerald Wilson in the Aaron Spelling drama "Dynasty" (1981–1989) and Arlen Ward in the primetime soap opera "Dallas" (1978–1991).  He also had a few significant film roles, including Sgt. McCallum in the suspense drama "Play Misty for Me" (1971), starring Clint Eastwood; the chief in another Clint Eastwood film, "Dirty Harry" (1971), and Father Nuncio in the horror film "The Amityville Horror" (1979), starring James Brolin and Margot Kidder.

Larch made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jack Cooke in "Six Years and a Day" (episode 91).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Harry Lauter

Herman Arthur "Harry" Lauter was a prolific American character actor of television and film.  He appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  He is best-remembered for playing heavies and supporting roles.  Although the vast majority of his early roles were in film, Lauter spent most of his later career working in television.  He had many uncredited roles in major films, including the dramatic comedy "A Foreign Affair" (1948), starring Jean Arthur, Marlene Dietrich and John Lund; the noir films "White Heat" (1949), starring James Cagney, and "The Mob" (1951), starring Broderick Crawford; the action drama "Twelve O'Clock High" (1949), starring Gregory Peck; the crime drama "The Big Heat" (1953), starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame, and the action comedy "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" (1963), featuring a star-studded ensemble cast.  He had a few credited roles appearing with more well-known actors, including Police Lt. Porter in the crime drama The Cry Baby Killer" (1958), starring Jack Nicholson; the doctor in the western "More Dead Than Alive" (1969), starring Clint Walker, Vincent Price and Anne Francis; and Gen. Winthrop in the sci-fi action film "Escape from the Planet of the Apes" (1971), starring Roddy McDowall and Kim Hunter.  He garnered more significant roles in B-movies, including Ben Fish in the drama "The Women of Picairn Island" (1956) and Clay Lanier in the crime drama "Louisiana Hussy" (1959).

Lauter guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the Lloyd Bridges adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the comedy series "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1967), the suburban sci-fi comedy "My Favorite Martian" (1963–1966), the family comedy "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966), the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), the action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), as well as the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975).

Lauter also played several recurring roles, including Jim Herrick in the adventure series "Waterfront" (1954–1956), Atlasande in the family sci-fi series "Rocky Jones, Space Ranger" (1954), and Ranger Clay Morgan in "Tales of the Texas Rangers" (1955–1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the hired gun in "The Bullet" (episode 163).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Branded" (1965–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Marc Lawrence

Marc Lawrence was an American actor who appeared in more than 200 films and television shows in a career spanning more than 70 years.  The majority of Lawrence's early roles were uncredited.  He was often typecast as a shady character, playing gangsters and mob bosses.  When he was investigated by the House Un-American Activities Committee, Lawrence was blacklisted, so he moved to Europe, where he continued working as an actor.  Eventually, he returned to the United States and resumed playing villains in film and television, including in two James Bond movies, "Diamonds Are Forever" (1971) and "The Man With the Golden Gun" (1974).

Lawrence made his first television appearance as a guest on the western series "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).  He also appeared in "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Lawrence made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Gavin in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8) and Cougar in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77).  In 1991, Lawrence published his autobiography, "Long Time No See: Confessions of a Hollywood Gangster."  He was also the subject of a novel by Jonathan Held, "The Beautiful and the Profane," published in 2003, two years before his death.

Linda Lawson

Linda Lawson, born Linda Gloria Spaziani, is an American television and film actress, as well as a former singer.  She has appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  She guest-starred in various popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the Lloyd Bridges adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), and the adventure crime series "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), as well as the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960) and the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  She has also played a few recurring roles, including Renee in the adventure series "Adventures in Paradise" (1959–1962), Pat Perry in the comedy series "Don't Call me Charlie" (1962–1963) and Laura Fremon in the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961-1966).  Her film roles include Dawn Gillis in the western "Apache Rifles" (1964), starring Audie Murphy, and Jan Stamper in the drama "Sometimes a Great Notion" (1970), starring Paul Newman and Henry Fonda.

Lawson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Vashti Croxton in "Assault" (episode 102).  She has guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Jennifer Lea

Jennifer Lea is an American actress who has worked primaily in television.  She has appeared in 24 movies and television shows in a decade-long career.  She guest-starred in a variety of popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the family comedies "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971) and "Family Affair" (1966–1971), as well as the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Dragnet" (1951–1959).  Lea made one apprearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Marge Crandell in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Sergeant Preston of the Yukon" (1955–1958), starring Dick Simmons, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone.

Norman Leavitt

Normal Leavitt, born Norman Turner Leavitt, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  Although the majority of his early work was in film, he segued into television in the 1950s.  He had numerous uncredited roles in major films, appearing in the musical comedy "Two Sisters from Boston" (1946), starring Kathryn Grayson and June Allyson; the dramatic comedy "A Foreign Affair" (1948), starring Marlene Dietrich and Jean Arthur; the film adaptation of Alexandre Dumas' "The Three Musketeers" (1948), starring Lana Turner, Gene Kelly and June Allyson; the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy; the drama "Full House" (1952), featuring a star-studded ensemble cast; and the adventure drama "The Ten Commandments" (1956), also starring an ensemble cast headed by Yul Brynner and Charlton Heston.  In television, he played several recurring roles, including Ralph in the western "Trackdown" (1957–1959); Wally in the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968); the telegrapher in "Bonanza" (1959–1973); and Mr. Felton in the family comedy "Mayberry R.F.D." (1968–1971).

Leavitt also guest-starred in a numerous television shows between the 1950s and 70s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the family comedies "The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour" (1957–1960) and "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the comedy "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971), the western action adventures "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), and "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), as well as the crime dramas, "M Squad" (1957–1960), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964).

Leavitt made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeptha Docking in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103) and the hotel clerk in "The Bullet" (episode 163).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Howard Ledig

Howard Ledig was an American television actor who appeared in nearly 20 television shows during his 10-year career.  Despite the brevity of his career, Ledig guest-starred in several popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), as well as the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959) and the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961).  Ledig made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jake Porter in "The Blowout" (episode 43).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Carol Leigh

Carol Leigh is an American television actress.  She has appeared in 12 television shows in five-years.  She guest-starred in several popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the comedy "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" (1950–1958), the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960) and the legal dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Naked City" (1958–1963).  Leigh made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Betty Lind in "Quiet Night, Deadly Night" (episode 146).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "The Adventures of Jim Bowie" (1956–1958), starring Scott Forbes, and "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda.

David Leland

David Leland was an American actor who worked primarily in television, appearing in 14 TV shows and movies during a decade-long career.  He appeared in the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960) and several westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Bronco" (1958–1962), starring Ty Hardin, "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, and "Laredo" (1965–1967), starring Neville Brand, Peter Brown and William Smith.  Leland made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cousin Healey in "The Woman" (episode 32).

Bethel Leslie

Bethel Leslie was an American stage, film and television actress, as well as a screenwriter.  She appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 50 years.  She was discovered by theater producer and director George Abbott, who cast her in a production of the comedy "Snafu" (1944).  She went on to appear in many Broadway productions, including "Goodbye, My Fancy" (1948), "The Time of the Cuckoo" (1952), "Inherit the Wind" (1955), "Catch Me If You Can" (1965), and "Long Day's Journey Into Night" (1986), in which she played Mary Tyrone, a role that garnered her a Tony Award nomination for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play.  She later reprised the role for a TV movie adaptation.  As a screenwriter, she composed scripts for various popular shows, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980) and "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990).

Leslie guest-starred in a many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the action comedy "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), and the daytime drama "One Life to Live" (1968–Present), as well as the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Mannix" (1967–1975).

Leslie made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Teresa Miller in "Stopover" (episode 107).  She guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Jack Lester

Jack Lester, born Jack Lester Swineford, was an American actor who worked primarily in radio and television.  He appeared in 40 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 60 years.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), starring Broderick Crawford, and the dramatic anthology series "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961).  He also provided voices in the animated family feature "The Last Unicorn" (1982).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Black Hat Murphy in "The Promoter" (episode 87).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

George Lindsey

George Lindsey was an American actor who worked primarily in television, appearing in almost 40 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  He attended Kemper Military School in Boonville, Missouri, and Florence State College, where he earned a Bachelor's degree in bioscience (the college is now the University of North Alabama, where he promoted the George Lindsey Film Festival since 1998).  Before moving to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career, Lindsey was a public high school teacher at Hazel Green High School in Hazel Green, Alabama.  He served in the Air Force and initially tried to break into show business in New York.  He is best-known for his role as Goober, the lovable bumpkin cousin of Gomer Pyle portrayed by Jim Nabors in the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), a role that he has reprised in various other shows, including the Andy Griffith spin-off series, "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969) and the series continuation "Mayberry R.F.D." (1968–1971), as well as the series reboot "The New Andy Griffith Show" (1971).

Lindsey used his celebrity to support philanthropic interests, including raising more than $1-mln over a period of 17 years for the Alabama Special Olympics through the George Lindsey Celebrity Weekend and Golf Tournament, which was held in Montgomery.  He also raised $50,000 for the Alabama Association of Retarded Citizens.  In addition to his philanthropy, Lindsey served as the head coach of winter games for the Minneapolis, Minnesota Special Olymics National Competition.  His home state of Alabama dedicated the "George Lindsey Highway" in Birmingham in his honor.  He recevied the Minnie Pearl Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997 and the first ICON Award presented by the Nashville Associations of Talent Directors in 2007.

Lindsey guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the Disney anthology series, "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the sci-fi adventure series "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" (1964–1968), the comedy variety hour "Hee Haw" (1969–1993) and the Aaron Spelling series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He has also provided his voice for a few Disney characters, including Lafayette in "The AristoCats" (1970) and Trigger in "Robin Hood" (1973).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dove in "Requiem at Mission Springs" (episode 164).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Morris Lippert

Morris Lippert was an American-born actor with a brief career in film and television.  He appeared in one movie starring Danny Kaye and in seven TV programs, including "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and a TV pilot with Sherry Lewis.  He made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Danny in "The Gaucho" (episode 14).

Eddie Little Sky

Eddie Little Sky, born Edsel Wallace Little and also known as Edward Little, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 70 movies and television shows during his two-decade career.  Prior to becoming an actor, Little Sky served in the United States Navy in the Pacific during World War II.  After the war, he was approached by the American actor and war hero Audie Murphy, who encouraged him to take up acting, which made him one of the first Native Americans to portray Native American characters in film.

Eddie Little Sky had uncredited roles in several notable films, including the historical crime drama "The FBI Story" (1959), starring James Stewart; the dramatic western "Cimarron" (1960), starring Glenn Ford; and the western comedy "The Hallelujah Trail" (1965), starring Burt Lancaster and Lee Remick.  He also had many memorable roles, including George C. George in the mystery fantasy "7 Faces of Dr. Lao" (1964), starring Tony Randall; Alchise in the action western "Deal at Diablo" (1966), starring James Garner and Sidney Poitier; Black Eagle in the western adventure drama "A Man Called Horse" (1970), starring Richard Harris; Denson in the horror thriller "The Car" (1977), starring James Brolin; and an indian in the western musical comedy "Paint Your Wagon" (1969), starring Lee Marvin, Clint Eastwood and Jean Seberg.

Eddie Little Sky guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family comedies "Mister Ed" (1958–1966) and "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1967), the sci-fi comedy "My Favorite Martian" (1963–1966), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the Aaron Spelling series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  Eddie Little Sky made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the Apache in "The Indian" (episode 21).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Branded" (1965–1966), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Perry Lopez

Perry Lopez was an American film and television actor.  Born in New York City, his career spanned more than 40 years from the 1950's until his his death in 2008.  He began acting on the stage in New York and was signed to a contract at Warner Bros. Studios in 1955.  In his early career, Lopez appeared in a string of B-movies and westerns, including "The Creature from the Black Lagoon" (1954), "Young Guns" (1956), "The Lone Ranger" (1949-1957), "Zorro" (1957–1959), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

Lopez was usually cast in Hispanic roles, although he portrayed the Persian Prince Ahmud in "Omar Khayyam" (1957) and a Cossack, Ostap Bulba, co-starring Yul Brynner and Tony Curtis in "Taras Bulba" (1962).  Lopez's best-known role was Lieutenant Lou Escobar in the 1974 film "Chinatown," co-starring Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway.  He reprised the role sixteen years later—with Escobar promoted to Captain—in the sequel, "The Two Jakes" (1990).

Lopez made many television appearances in the 1960s and 1970s.   He appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Manolo Argentez in "The Gaucho" (episode 14).

James Luisi

James Luisi was an American stage, film and television actor, as well as a professional basketball player.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He attended St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights, New York, on a basketball scholarship and served in the Army during the Korean War.  He then played guard for the Baltimore Bullets for two seasons (1953–1954).  Luisi then decided to shift his focus from sports to acting and enrolled in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City, eventually landing roles on Broadway.  His stage credits include performances in the musicals "Do I Hear a Waltz?" (1965) and "Sweet Charity" (1966).

Luisi played a few memorable film roles, including the lead role of Sgt. Vince De Carlo in the horror thriller "Killer's Delight" (1978), also starring Susan Sullivan and John Karlen; George Benson in the drama "Norma Rae" (1979), starring Sally Field and Beau Bridges; and Roy in the biographical drama "Star 80" (1983), starring Mariel Hemingway, Eric Roberts and Cliff Robertson.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his portrayal of Lt. Doug Chapman in the crime drama "The Rockford Files" (1974–1980), a role that he reprised in the TV movies "The Rockford Files: If the Frame Fits… " (1996) and "The Rockford Files: Friends and Foul Play" (1996).  He received an Emmy Award for his portrayal of George Washington in the miniseries "First Ladies Diaries: Martha Washington" (1975).

Luisi guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, many in the police-action/crime and legal genres, including "Adam-12" (1968–1975), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), "Kojak" (1973–1978), "Cannon" (1971–1976), "Ironside" (1967–1975), "Police Story" (1973–1977), "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–1979).  Luisi appeared in other genres, as well, including the Aaron Spelling series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990) and the action adventure series "The A-Team" (1983–1987).  He also played a few recurring roles, including Harry Foreman in the drama "Harris and Company" (1979) and Lieutenant Gilbert Garcia in the primetime soap opera "Knots Landing" (1979–1993).  Luisi made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Chuley Carr in "Sporting Chance" (episode 128).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Karl Lukas

Karl Lukas, born Karol Louis Lukasiak, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  Lukas had a few memorable film roles, including Pokey Stiff in the action adventure comedy "Emperor of the North" (1973), starring Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine and Keith Carradine; Charley in the crime drama "Hustle" (1975), starring Burt Reynolds and Catherine Deneuve; and the bartender in the western comedy "The Frisco Kid" (1979), starring Gene Wilder and Harrison Ford.

Lukas guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the anthology series "Four Star Playhouse" (1952–1956) and "Playhouse 90" (1956–1961), the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the family comedies "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971), The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968) and "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the sci-fi comedy "My Favorite Martian" (1963–1966), the espionage action adventure "I Spy" (1965–1968), the musical comedy "The Monkees" (1966–1968), the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), the fantasy comedy "Bewitched" (1964–1972) and the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).  He also had a few recurring roles, including Private Stash Kadowski in the military comedy "The Phil Silvers Show" (1955–1959), Scotty in the family comedy "Family Affair" (1966–1971) and the maintenance man Carl in the drama "St. Elsewhere" (1982–1988).  Lukas made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Oliver in "The Brother-in-law" (episode 5).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Dayton Lummis

Dayton Lummis was a prolific American character actor of stage, film and television.  He appeared in nearly 140 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He studied theater arts at the Martha Oatman School in Los Angeles and made his Broadway debut in 1943.  He is best-remembered for his portrayals of authority figures in anthology series and westerns.  He had several memorable film roles, including Messala in the historical drama "Julius Ceasar" (1953), starring Louis Calhern, Marlon Brando and James Mason; General Douglas MacArthur in the biographical war drama "The Court-Martial of Billy Mitchell" (1955), starring Gary Cooper and Rod Steiger; Judge Groat in the Alfred Hitchcock noir film "The Wrong Man" (1956), starring Henry Fonda and Vera Miles; and Eddington in the film adaptation of Sinclair Lewis' satirical novel "Elmer Gantry" (1960), starring Burt Lancaster and Jean Simmons, as well as minor parts in notable films, including the biographical crime drama "Compulsion" (1959), starring Orson Welles and Dean Stockwell; and the Stanley Kubrick historical action adventure "Spartacus" (1960), starring Kirk Douglas.

Lummis guest-starred in a variety of anthology series, including "Four Star Playhouse" (1952–1962), "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), "G.E. True Theater" (1953–1962) and "Playhouse 90" (1956–1961).  He guest-starred in several other popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962).  He also had a few recurring roles, including Dr. Hillary Tyson in the family sci-fi "Rocky Jones, Space Ranger" (1954) and Marshal Andy Morrison in the western "Law of the Plainsman" (1959).

Lummis made two appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jake Shaw in "Lariat" (episode 67) and Colonel Craig in "The Illustrator" (episode 88). He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Ken Lynch

Ken Lynch was a prolific American charactor actor of radio, film and television, especially crime dramas.  He appeared in nearly 180 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 35 years.  As a character actor, he was noted for his imposing presence, which made him well-suited to the roles of tough street cops and detectives.  Although he got his start in radio dramas, his work would take him to Hollywood, where he appeared in popular films and television shows.  Despite his high visibility in television, Lynch had several memorable film roles, including Det. Sgt. James Durgo in the crime drama "Anatomy of a Murder" (1959), starring James Stewart, Lee Remick and Ben Gazzara; the Chicago policeman Charley in the Alfred Hitchcock romantic mystery adventure "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint; and Captain Johnson in the crime drama "Dead Ringer" (1964), starring Bette Davis, Karl Malden and Peter Lawford.

Lynch guest-starred in a variety of crime dramas throughout his career, including "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Adam–12" (1968–1975), "Mannix" (1967–1975), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  He appeared in many other popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the legal dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the adventure dramas "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the classic sci-fi series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the war comedy "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969), and the romantic war drama "The Winds of War" (1983).

Lynch played several recurring roles, including the lieutenant in the crime drama "The Plainclothesman" (1949–1954), Pablo in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), Andy Gorman in the western "The Tall Man" (1960–1962), Lt. Thomas Brand in the crime drama "Checkmate" (1960–1962), Lt. Det. Tom Handley in the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and Lt. Barney Keller in the action crime drama "Honey West" (1965–1966); however, he is best-remembered for his portrayal of Police Sergeant Grover in the crime drama "McCloud" (1970–1977).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Karl Galt in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

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Charles Macauley

Charles Macauley was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He had a few memorable film roles, including Admiral Herb Corrigan in the disaster film "Airport '77" (1977), starring Jack Lemmon, James Stewart, Joseph Cotten, Christopher Lee and Olivia Havilland; and the President of the United States in the Ron Howard romantic comedy "Splash" (1984), starring Tom Hanks, Daryl Hannah, John Candy, Eugene Levy and Dody Goodman; in addition to various roles in several made-for-TV Perry Mason films.

Macauley guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, including the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the crime dramas "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the science fiction series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the detective series "Cannon" (1971–1976) and the Aaron Spelling fantasy series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sloan in "Sheer Terror" (episode 113).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

George Macready

George Macready was an American stage, film and television actor whose career spanned nearly 30 years.  He graduated from Brown University and worked briefly as a newspaperman in New York.  Attracted to the theater, on the advice of the Polish classical stage director Richard Boleslawski, Macready pursued an acting career.  Later, he claimed a common lineage with the 19th century Shakespearean thespian, William Macready.  His distinctive to-the-manor born diction, refined features, aristocratic bearing and prominent scar on his right cheek were affects well-suited to playing urbane but vaguely sinister characters.

Macready made his Broadway debut in 1926 in "The Scarlet Letter."  He continued to work on Broadway until 1958, appearing in 15 plays—mostly in dramatic roles, but also making some comedic turns.  Macready's first film credit was playing a schoolteacher in the 1942 World War II drama, "Commandos Strike at Dawn."  He appeared in numerous films, including "The Seventh Cross" and "The Missing Juror"(both in 1944), "Counter-Attack" and "My Name Is Julia Ross" (both in 1945).  His best role during the 1940's was the mysterious and malevolent Ballin Mundson in "Gilda" (1946), starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford.

Beginning in 1954, Macready appeared in numerous television series, ranging from westerns to crime and science fiction genres.  He made two appearances on THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Judge Zephonias Burton in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6) and Matt Wymerman in "Lariat" (episode 67).  His performance in Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" (1947), in which he plays French General Paul Mireau, is regarded as Macready's best work.   The film is a semi-fictionalized account of military brutality and mutiny in the French Army during World War I .

Henry Madden

Henry Madden worked briefly as actor, with just a few titles to his credit.  He portrayed film director Easton in "The Small Hours" (1962), written and directed by Norman C. Chaitin.  Henry Madden made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hal Spencer in "Squeeze Play" (episode 152).

Arthur Malet

Arthur Malet is a British film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He has had several memorable film roles, including Mr. Dawes Junior in the Disney musical "Mary Poppins" (1964), starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke; the graveyard keeper in the horror thriller "Halloween" (1978), starring Donald Pleasence and Jamie Lee Curtis; and Tootles in the Steven Spielberg homage to Peter Pan, "Hook" (1991), starring Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts and Bob Hoskins.

Malet guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the medical dramas "Ben Casey" (1961–1966) and "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the family comedies "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968) , the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), the cowboy cop in New York serial "McCloud" (1972–1977), the action crime series "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981) and the police procedural "21 Jump Street" (1987–1991).  He has also had a few recurring roles, including Carl in the drama "Casablanca" (1983), Bobby in the comedy "Easy Street" (1986–1987) and Ryan in the primetime soap opera "Dallas" (1987–1991).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeremy Pennebroke in "Sporting Chance" (episode 128).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Peggy Maley

Peggy Malley is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  She was crowned Miss Atlantic City in 1942.  She is best-known for delivering the famous line "Hey, Johnny, what are you rebelling against?" to Marlon Brando in the outlaw biker film "The Wild One" (1953).  Her more memorable film roles include Jean in the noir film "Human Desire" (1954), starring Glenn Ford, Gloria Grahame and Broderick Crawford; and the blonde stripper Francine in the science fiction film "Indestructible Man" (1956), starring Lon Chaney Jr., Max Showalter and Marian Carr.

Malley guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the CBS anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the private eye series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961).  Malley made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Liz in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).  She also guest-starred in the western "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen.

John Mamo (Fujioka)

John Fujioka, also known as John Mamo, is an American-born film and television actor of Japanese descent.  He has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 40 years.  In addition to acting, Fujioka worked as a public school teacher in Hawaii.  A highly recognizable veteran actor frequently cast in ethnic roles, among his memorable film characters were Rear Admiral Tamon Yamaguchi in the war film "Midway" (1976), starring Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda and James Coburn; Emperor Hirohito in the biographical war drama "MacArthur" (1977), starring Gregory Peck; Mr. Uwatsum in the mystery comedy "The Private Eyes" (1980), starring Tim Conway and Don Knotts; and Nishikura in the World War II drama "Pearl Harbor" (2001), starring Ben Affleck and Kate Beckinsale.  He appeared in a string of Japanese themed action dramas, playing Shinyuki in the ninja action film "American Ninja" (1985), starring Michael Dudikoff, a role that he reprised in the sequel "American Ninja 2: The Confrontation" (1987); Yasujiro Endo in "The Last Samurai" (1991); Tatsuya Sanga in "American Samura" (1992); Isshin Tendo in the action film "American Yakuza" (1993), starring Viggo Mortensen.

Fujioka guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, frequently making multiple appearances, including appearances in the science fiction series "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea" (1964–1968), the sitcom "McHale's Navy" (1962–1966), the original version of the police drama "Hawaii Five-O" (1968–1980); the western action drama "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), the cop thriller "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–1979), the comedy set in the Korean War, "M*A*S*H" (1972–1983) and the action adventure series "The A-Team" (1983–1987).  He has also had a few recurring roles, including Kevin in the comedy "The Last Resort" (1979–1980); Todo in the adventure series "Tales of the Gold Monkey" (1982–1983); he made two appearances as Kuroda, the Japanese soldier lost in the jungle and for whom World War II had not ended, in "The Six Million Dollar Man" (1974–1978); and Master Rin in "Walker, Texas Ranger" (1993–2001).  In 1988, he portrayed Baldhead Kin in several episodes of the television mini-series "Noble House, " based on the James Clavell novel.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hikaru Yamanaka in "The Sixteenth Cousin" (episode 159).

Mickey Manners

Mickey Manners, born Solomon Shapiro, is an American actor who has worked primarily in television, in addition to being a singer, dancer and comedian.  He has appeared in 20 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He is often recognized for having been a regular panelist on the game show "Stump the Stars" (1947).  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1960s through the 90s, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the CBS sitcoms "The Lucy Show" (1962–1968) and "Murphy Brown" (1988–1998), the Buck Henry spy spoof, "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the World War II comedy "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971) and the variety show "The Red Skelton Show" (1951–1971).  Manners also had a recurring role as Joe Foley in the comedy "Many Happy Returns" (1964–1965).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Moss Jackman in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).

Paul Mantee

Paul Mantee, born Paul Marianetti, is an American actor who has worked primarily in television, especially in crime dramas and related genre.  He has appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He studied journalism at San Mateo Junior College in California and enlisted in the US Navy during the Korean War.  Mantee got his first acting break when he was cast to play the lead role of Cmdr. Christopher "Kit" Draper in the science fiction film classic "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" (1964), also starring Victor Lundin and Adam West.  It would prove to be the role for which he is most well-known.  Among his other film characters were the doctor in the semi-biographical martial arts film "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" (1993), starring Jason Scott Lee, Lauren Holly and Robert Wagner; the reporter in the drama "Apollo 13" (1995), starring Tom Hanks, Kevin Bacon, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris and Kathleen Quinlan; and General Willard in "Memorial Day" (1998).

Mantee guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Ironside" (1967–1975) and "Kojak" (1973–1978), the medical dramas "Ben Casey" (1961–1966) and "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the campy superhero action series "Batman" (1966–1968), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the CBS detective series "Cannon" (1971–1976) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1978), the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), the action adventure series "The A-Team" (1983–1987) and the mystery series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).  He also played several recurring roles, including Det. Al Corassa in the police procedural "Cagney and Lacey" (1982–1988) and Cmdr. Clayton in the police drama "Hunter" (1984–1991).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cade Conway in "Assault" (episode 102) and John Wing in "Incident at Line Shack Six" (episode 156).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).  Mantee has written two novels, "In Search of the Perfect Ravioli" (1991) and "Bruno of Hollywood" (1994).

Steve Marlo

Steve Marlo made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Doke Marvin in "The Patsy" (episode 41), The Domino Kid in "The Hero" (episode 59), Sgt. Will in "The Assailants" (episode 149), Stagg in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154).  An alumnus of Lee Strasberg's Actors Studio, New York, Marlo had a prolific career on the stage.  He won the Pulitzer Prize and Drama Critic's Award for his role in "Picnic."  Marlo also had many screen credits in film and television.  He appeared in "The Bob Cummings Show," "Law of the Plainsman," "Ben Casey," "Death Valley Days," "Combat!," "Bonanza," "Mission: Impossible," "Star Trek," "The F.B.I.," "Land of the Giants," "Emergency," "Eight Is Enough," "Falcon Crest," among many other TV series.  He also was a dialogue coach.

Andy Marten

Andy Marten made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a member of the townsfolk in "Hostages to Fortune" (episode 160).

Eugene Martin (Mazzola)

Eugene Martin, born Eugene Mazzola, is an American television and film actor and also a producer, production manager and assistant director.  He has appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than six decades.  Born into a family in the entertainment industry, he had his first film role portraying the infant Anthony Caruso in "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), and he went on to enjoy a successful career as a child actor.  Among the memorable films in which he appeared, Martin/Mazzola played the role of the son of Rameses in Cecile B. DeMille's Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring an ensemble cast led by Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, Ann Baxter and Edward G. Robinson; and he portrayed Edward V in the historical horror drama "Tower of London" (1962), starring Vincent Price and Michael Pate.  He took a break from acting to serve in the Navy from 1968 to 1970.  Upon returning from Vietnam, he worked as a photojournalist for the Navy in San Diego.  He enrolled in college and returned to working in the film industry, but this time behind the camera.  During his long career, he has worked in several different capacities—as a second assistant director, producer and production manager.

Martin guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the police detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the private eye series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977).  He also had a recurring role as Joey Drum in the western "Jefferson Drum" (1958–1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bobby Moon in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  Martin guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  Among Mazzola's many production and AD'ing credits are "Capone" (1975), starring Ben Gazzara and Susan Blakely; "Brainstorm" (1983), starring Christopher Walken and Natalie Wood in her last role; "Little Buddha" (1993), starring Keanu Reeves and Bridget Fonda; "End of the Spear" (2005), starring Louie Leonardo; "Love Happens" (2009), starring Jennifer Aniston and Aaron Eckhart; and "The Details" (2011), starring Elizabeth Banks and Tobey Maguire.

George Matthews

George Matthews was an American film, theater and television actor.  His filmography includes more than 50 roles in a career spanning nearly three decades.  He was heavy-featured and burly, so frequently was cast in villain roles; although, he often portrayed tough guy characters for comedic effect, especially on the stage.  He also appeared in musicals and dramas, with a notable portrayal of Mitch in "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1949–50), co-starring Uta Hagen and Anthony Quinn.  His performance won acclaim from"The New York Times' " Brooks Atkinson.

Prior to making one appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, Matthews co-starred with Chuck Connors in the Spencer Tracy – Katherine Hepburn vehicle, "Pat and Mike" (1952).  In THE RIFLEMAN, Matthews played Abel MacDonald in "The Angry Man" (episode 31).   Other guest-starring roles in television included appearances on "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and a recurring character in Glynis Johns' 1963 comedy series about a mystery writer and amateur sleuth.

John Maxwell

John Maxwell was an American actor who worked primarily in film.  He appeared in nearly 150 movies and television shows during his two-decade career.  Most of his roles were uncredited, but he appeared in many notable films, including the Warner Brothers romantic comedy "The Male Animal" (1942), starring Henry Fonda, Olivia de Havilland and Joan Leslie; the romantic adventure fantasy "Kismet" (1944), starring Ronald Colman and Marlene Dietrich; the comedy "Monsieur Beaucaire" (1946), starring Bob Hope and Joan Caulfield; the romantic drama "The Girl Who Had Everything" (1953), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Fernando Lamas and William Powell; the science fiction classic "The War of the Worlds" (1953), starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson; "Johnny Guitar" (1954), starring Joan Crawford and Sterling Hayden; the science fiction cult classic "Them!" (1954), starring James Whitemore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon and James Arness; and the western "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" (1957), starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas.  He also played the role of Dr. Swanson in the John Huston noir film "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), starring Sterling Hayden, Jean Hagen, Sam Jaffe, Louis Calhern and James Whitmore.

Maxwell guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the Disney anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990).  Maxwell also had a recurring role playing Alex Gregory in the crime drama "The Court of Last Resort" (1957–1958).  He made two appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam Weltz in "The Challenge" (episode 28) and the card dealer in "Lariat" (episode 67).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Charles Maxwell

Charles Maxwell, born Charles Carlton Maxwell, was an American actor who worked primarily in television, in addition to being a director and producer.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the science fiction anthology series "Science Fiction Theatre" (1955–1957), the action series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the private eye series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the Disney anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the classic science fiction series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  He also had a few recurring roles, including Special Agent Joe Carey in the drama "I Led 3 Lives" (1953–1956) and the radio announcer in the sitcom "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1967), for which he went uncredited; although, it was his longest-running role.

He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Gus Torpin in "The Sixteenth Cousin" (episode 159).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, often making multiple appearances, including "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Laramie" (1959–1963),), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Maxwell made two appearances in the Chuck Connors series "Branded" (1965–1966).

Asa Maynor

Asa Maynor, born Virginia Maynor, is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows during her 16-year career.  She appeared in several memorable films, including the leading role as Connie Hayward in the sci-fi B-movie "Man Beast" (1956) and Nikki the secretary in the black comedy "The Loved One" (1965), starring Robert Morse, Anjanette Comer, Rod Steiger, John Gielgud and Liberace.  She played Mrs. Riley in the science fiction film "Conquest of the Planet of the Apes" (1972), starring Roddy McDowall, Don Murray, Ricardo Montalban and Natalie Trundy and had an uncredited role in the musical comedy film "Never Steal Anything Small" (1959), starring James Cagney and Shirley Jones.

Maynor guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the sitcom "McHale's Navy" (1962–1966) and Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  She also had a recurring role as Dixie in the adventure series "Straightaway" (1961–1962).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Molly in "The Bullet" (episode 163).  She also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Paul Mazursky

Paul Mazursky, born Irwin Mazursky in New York City, is a film and television actor, as well as distinguished director, producer and screenwriter.  He has appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 60 years.  Following his graduation from Brooklyn College in 1951, Mazursky made his film debut as Pvt. Sidney in Stanley Kubrick's first feature film, the military action adventure "Fear and Desire" (1953), in which he co-starred with Frank Silvera and Kenneth Harp.  His other film roles include Emmanuel Stoker in the social commentary film "Blackboard Jungle" (1955), starring Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, Louis Calhern and Sidney Poitier; and Teddy Peppers in the crime thriller "2 Days in the Valley" (1996), starring James Spader, Danny Aiello, Peter Horton and Teri Hatcher.

Mazursky wrote his first screenplay for the Peter Sellers comedy "I Love You, Alice B. Toklas" (1968), which also starred Jo Van Fleet, Leigh Taylor-Young, Joyce Van Patten and David Arkin.  He has directed several critically acclaimed films featuring Oscar-winning performances by six of his leading actors, including the dramatic comedy "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice" (1969), starring Natalie Wood, Robert Culp, Elliott Gould and Dyan Cannon; the road movie "Harry and Tonto" (1974), starring Art Carney, Michael Butler, Melanie Mayron, Ellen Burstyn and Larry Hagman; the bittersweet social drama "An Unmarried Woman" (1978), starring Jill Clayburgh, Alan Bates and Michael Murphy; and the film adaptation of Isaac Bashevis Singer's story set in post-World War II New York, "Enemies, a Love Story" (1989), starring Ron Silver, Anjelica Huston, Lena Olin and Margaret Sophie Stein.  In 2000, he received the Austin Film Festival's Distinguished Screenwriter Award.  He is currently a member of the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Mazursky has guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the drama "The Sopranos" (1999–2007).  He has also played a few recurring roles, including Phil Brooks in the family drama "Once and Again" (1999–2002) and Norm in the Larry David comedy "Curb Your Enthusiasm" (2000– ).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the uncredited part of Shorty in "Shotgun Man" (episode 69), and Sylvester Bulgutch in "Hostages to a Fortune" (episode 160).  Mazursky also co-wrote "Tinhorn" (episode 134).

Lin McCarthy

Lin McCarthy, born Linwood Winder McCarthy, was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in 65 movies and television shows during a career spanning 35 years.  Following his service during World War II, McCarthy studied acting on the G.I. bill at Geller's Theater Workshop in Los Angeles, California.  Among his film roles was Capt. Anderson in the military drama "The D.I." (1957), starring Jack Webb.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the anthology drama series "Studio One in Hollywood" (1948–1958), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the detective series "Cannon" (1971–1976), the family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981) and the medical crime drama "Quincy, M.E." (1976–1983).

McCarthy made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Charley Burn in "The Surveyors" (episode 54).  He also portrayed Dr. Cox in the western mini-series "How the West Was Won" (1977), starring James Arness, Eva Marie Saint and Bruce Boxleitner, leading an ensemble cast, and he guest-starred in several other weekly western series, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Kevin McCarthy

Kevin McCarthy was an American stage, film and television actor whose prolific career spanned more than six decades.  Brother of renowned author, Mary McCarthy, he made his Broadway debut in 1938 in "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" and appeared in 18 theatrical productions throughout his career, notably, portraying Harry S. Truman in "Give 'Em Hell Harry," which toured the United States for two decades.  McCarthy appeared in over 200 film and television roles.  His portrayal of Biff in the 1951 film adaptation of "Death of a Salesman" garnered him an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor and won him a Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year, Actor.  His best-known role was Dr. Miles Bennell in the 1956 science fiction horror classic "Invasion of the Body Snatchers."  The iconic film was selected for the National Film Registry in 1994 and in 2008 was named one of the Top 10 science fiction films of all time by the American Film Institute.  In later years, he embraced the cult camp status of the picture and his role in it, even making a cameo appearance in the 1976 remake of the "Body Snatchers."  

McCarthy made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mark Twain in "The Shattered Idol" (episode 120) and Winslow Quince in "Suspicion" (episode 157).  He continued to work until the year before his death at age 96—his last screen appearances were in two 2009 releases, the 18th century period film, "Wesley," and the short comedy film "I Do."

Sean McClory

Sean McClory, born Sean Joseph McClory, was an Irish film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 130 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 50 years.  He had many film roles, including uncredited parts in the drama "The Glass Menagerie" (1950), starring Jane Wyman, Kirk Douglas, Gertrude Lawrence and Arthur Kennedy, and the Disney musical "Mary Poppins" (1964), starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke, as well as several more memorable roles, including Owen Glynn in the John Ford romantic comedy-drama "The Quiet Man" (1952), starring John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, Victor McLaglen and Barry Fitzgerald; Maj. Kibbee in the science fiction film "Them!" (1954), starring James Whitmore, Edmund Gwenn, Joan Weldon and James Arness; and Mr. Grace in the John Huston film "The Dead" (1987), starring Anjelica Huston, Donal McCann, Dan O'Herily, Donal Donnelly and Helena Carroll.

McClory guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "Thriller" (1960–1962) and "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Honey West" (1965–1966), the family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1974) and "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the mystery series "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).  He also had a few recurring roles, including Jack McGivern in the western drama "The Californians" (1957–1959) and Myles Delaney in the adventure series "Bring 'Em Back Alive" (1982–1983).

McClory made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colonel Black in "The Knight Errant" (episode 117) and Dennis O'Flarrety in "I Take This Woman" (episode 148).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Renny McEvoy

Renny McEvoy was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He had a few roles in notable films, including Johnny Leeweather in the Cecil B. DeMille World War II film "The Story of Dr. Wassell" (1944), starring Gary Cooper, Laraine Day, Signe Hasso and Dennis O'Keefe; and an uncredited role in the comedy "Let's Make It Legal" (1951), starring Claudette Colbert, Macdonald Carey, Zachary Scott, Barbara Bates and Marilyn Monroe.

McEvoy guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), the action adventure series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the anthology series "Four Star Playhouse" (1952–1956), "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990) and "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the family sitcom "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Burke in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Dallas "Dal" McKennon

Dal McKennon, born Dallas Raymond McKennon, was an American television and voice actor.  He appeared in nearly 180 television shows and shorts during a career spanning more than 50 years.  He attended the University of Washington prior to enlisting in the Army Signal Corps during World War II, but when he segued into acting, he became a familiar face on-screen.  His tall, gangly stature and unruly beard made him an easily recognizable character actor, and his voice was so malleable, he could contort it to play any kind of character.  McKennon is best-known for his voice work, having brought to life many iconic characters, including Woody Woodpecker's arch nemesis, Buzz Buzzard, and also Q.T. Hush, Gumby, Tintin, and many of the voices in the "Archie" cartoons.  His voice also can be heard in various Disney theme park attractions, as well as movies, including "Mary Poppins" (1964) and "Lady and the Tramp" (1955).  Among his film roles, he played small parts in the Alfred Hitchcock suspense thriller "The Birds" (1963) and the Elvis Presley vehicle "Clambake" (1967).

McKennon guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the sitcoms "My Three Sons" (1960–1972) and "My Favorite Martian" (1963–1966), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966) and the detective series "Cannon" (1971–1976).

McKennon often portrayed the villain in westerns and once quipped, "I specialized in barn-burnings."  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Judge Hopkins in "The Bullet" (episode 163) and Judge Moze in "Which Way Did They Go" (episode 167).  He guest-starred in several other western series, including "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  He also had a recurring role as Cincinnatus, the tavern owner, in "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Patrick McVey

Patrick McVey was an American stage, film and television actor who appeared in 100 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  Most of his many film appearances were uncredited roles early in his career, including in the romantic comedy "Caught in the Draft" (1941), starring Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour; the adventure comedy "Invisible Agent" (1942), starring Peter Lorre; the noir film "Dark Passage" (1947), starring Humphrey Boggart and Lauren Bacall.  He played Sergeant Flamm, the Chicago policeman, in the mystery adventure film "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason; Police Office Mike Tanner in the Frank Sinatra film "The Detective" (1969); and Bruce's father in the sports drama "Bang the Drum Slowly" (1973), starring Robert DeNiro (as Bruce Pearson), Michael Moriarty and Vincent Gardenia.

McVey guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He also played several recurring roles, including Steve Wilson in the drama "Big Town" (1950–1956), Lt. Col. Wesley Hayes in the western "Boots and Saddles" (1957), and Ben Andrews in the crime drama "Manhunt" (1959–1961).  McVey made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Walt Hake in "The Hawk" (episode 29) and Jake Striker in "The Quiet Fear" (episode 127).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Don Megowan

Don Megowan was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He had a few film roles, including an uncredited part in the romantic thriller "To Catch a Thief" (1955), starring Cary Grant and Grace Kelly, and Luke Phelan in the war film "The Devil's Brigade" (1968), starring William Holden, Cliff Robertson and Vince Edwards.

Megowan guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the western action drama "Kung Fu" (1972–1975) and the Aaron Spelling fantasy series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He also had a recurring role as Captain Huckabee in the adventure series "The Beachcomber" (1962).

Megowan made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dorf in "Seven" (episode 79).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Branded" (1965–1966), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

William "Bill" Meigs

William "Bill" Meigs was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in 19 movies and television shows during a 30-year career.  Among a handful of film roles, he had uncredited parts in the classic western "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" (1957), starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas, and the sci-fi horror "The Navy Vs. the Night Monsters" (1966), starring Mamie Van Doren.  He played Capt. Rand Treadway in "The Glory Guys" (1965), a feature produced by Levy-Gardner-Laven Productions, directed by Arnold Laven and Sam Peckinpah (uncredited), and starring Harve Presnell and a young James Caan.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the crime drama "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  Meigs made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colonel Cushman in "The Sheridan Story" (episode 16), Deputy Phil Rogers in "The Second Witness" (episode 23) and Sam Benson in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone.

Joe Mell

Joe Mell, born Joseph Mellovitz, was an American film and television actor who appeared in nearly 180 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He had a few roles in memorable films, including Dan in the romance "Magnificent Obsession" (1954), starring Jane Wyman and Rock Hudson; Dr. Hugo Wagner in the B-movie horror cult classic "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" (1957), starring Michael Landon and Whit Bissell; and an uncredited role as a newspaper vendor in the musical "Thoroughly Modern Millie" (1967), starring Julie Andrews.

Mell guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the campy comedy-horror sitcom "The Munsters" (1964–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the spinoff series "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969), the family comedy "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974) and the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969).

Mell had a recurring role as Bill Pence in the western "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam Moody in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.

Troy Melton

Troy Melton was an American actor who worked primarily in television, as well as a stuntman.  He appeared in 110 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than five decades.  As a stuntman, he performed the stunts for several popular shows, including the westerns "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), in addition to serving as a stunt double for Kent Taylor in the crime drama "Boston Blackie" (1951–1953) and Duncan Renaldo in the western "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956).

Melton guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973) and the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).

Melton made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Wally Pierson in "First Wages" (episode 112) and Ab Richards in "Deadly Image" (episode 132).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Branded" (1965–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

John Milford

John Milford made eleven appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He had a long acting career, primarily in television, spanning five decades.   He ran the Chamber Theatre on Cahuenga Blvd. West in Hollywood, where he helped many young actors get a start in the entertainment industry.  He is also credited with the original design for the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Diana Millay

Diana Millay is an American actress who began her career as a child model and later was under contract with the John Robert Powers modeling agency.  Beginning in high school, she appeared in summer stock, playing leading or featured roles in many classic American plays.  After seven seasons, she made the leap to Broadway, where she appeared in "Fair Game" with Sam Levene and Ellen Burstyn; "Drink to Me Only," co-starring Tom Poston; "Roger the Sixth" opposite Alan Alda; and also "The Glass Rooster" and "Boeing Boeing."  She toured the US and Canada in a production of "The Seven Year Itch," co-starring Eddie Bracken.

Millay is best known for her acting career in television, which spanned the mid-1950s through the early '70s.  She appeared in more than 200 television programs and is best-remembered for her role as Laura Collins in 67 episodes of the daytime drama "Dark Shadows" (1966–1969).  She also appeared in the long-running serial "The Secret Storm" (1954–1974), playing Kitty Styles in the first episode of Season 1.  She guest-starred in numerous popular shows, including three appearances in the legal-crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and one appearance in "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), starring Ben Gazzara and Chuck Connors.  She also appeared in several popular family comedies, including "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), starring Robert Young and Jane Wyatt; "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), starring Dwayne Hickman and Bob Denver; "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray and Don Grady; as well as the comedy series "The Tab Hunter Show" (1960).  Millay appeared in a variety of other TV genres, including the short-lived Civil War drama "The Americans" (1961), starring Darryl Hickman and Richard Davalos; the adventure series "The Aquanuts" (1960–1961), starring Keith Larsen, Jeremy Slate and Ron Ely; and the popular espionage series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum.  Her credits include the role of Cynthia Raine in the 1961 TV movie "Las Vegas Beat," an adventure mystery starring Peter Graves.

Diana Millay appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Beth Block in "The Actress" (episode 94).  Most of her screen credits were for guest turns in westerns, and she appeared in most of the iconic series, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Tales of Wells Fargo" and "Maverick" (both running from 1957–1962), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Eventually, Millay turned from acting to writing, publishing several books, including I'd Rather Eat Than Act (1996, 2004), The Power of Halloween (2003) and How to Create Good Luck.

Denny Miller

Denny Miller, born Dennis Linn Miller, is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly five decades.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 90s, including the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the sitcoms "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1965) and "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), the espionage thrillers "I Spy" (1965–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), the crime drama "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980), the science fiction series "Battlestar Galactica" (1978–1979), the fantasy drama "Fantasy Island" (1978–1984), the action crime drama "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981), the action adventure "The Fall Guy" (1981–1986) and the murder mystery "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).

Miller also had several recurring roles, including Duke Shannon in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), Mike McCluskey in the sitcom "Mona McCluskey" (1965–1966), Max Flowers in the soap opera "Dallas" (1978–1991) and Sheriff Owen Kearney in the western "Lonesome Dove: The Series" (1994–1995).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Reuben Miles in "The Promoter" (episode 87).  He has guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Mort Mills

Mort Mills, born Mortimer Morris Kaplan, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 140 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 20 years.  He had a few roles in memorable films, including Martin in the drama "Affair in Trinidad" (1952), starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford; Al Schwartz in the Orson Welles crime thriller "Touch of Evil" (1958), starring Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Joseph Calleia, Akim Tamiroff and Marlene Dietrich; and the highway patrol officer in the Alfred Hitchcock suspense film "Psycho" (1960), starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh.

Mills guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the Disney anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police dramas "The Mod Squad" (1968–1973) and "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  He also had a few recurring roles, including Marshal Frank Tallman in the western "Man Without a Gun" (1957–1959), Sheriff Madden in "The Big Valley" (1965–1969) and Sgt. Ben Landro in the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).

Mills made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joshua Snipe in "The Sister" (episode 9) and Jake Owens in "The Jealous Man" (episode 136).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Irving Mitchell

Irving Mitchell, born James Irving Mitchell, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He was typecast as a professional, often portraying judges, lawyers, bank clerks and similar roles.  He had uncredited roles in a few notable films, including the iconic drama "Citizen Kane" (1941), starring Orson Welles, and the film noir "The Harder They Fall" (1956), starring Humphrey Bogart.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Martin Harlow in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6).  He also guest-starred in the western "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner.

Gerald Mohr

Gerald Mohr was a character actor of radio, stage, film and television.  He appeared in 150 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He got his start in radio, eventually making the transition to stage acting via the Orson Welles Mercury Theatre company.  He placed his acting career on hold in order to serve in the Air Force during World War II.  A familiar voice in radio, Mohr gradually made the transition to television during the 1950s.  He is best-remembered for his portrayals of slick, professional villains.  He had several memorable film roles, including Capt. Delgado in the noir film "Gilda" (1946), starring Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford and George Macready; Tami Giacoppetti in the noir film "Detective Story" (1951), starring Kirk Douglas, Eleanor Parker, William Bendix, Cathy O'Donnell and Lee Grant; and Tom Branca in the romantic musical "Funny Girl" (1968), starring Barbra Streisand and Omar Sharif.

Mohr guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the sitcom "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the anthology series "Four Star Playhouse" (1952–1956), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the espionage series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He also had various recurring roles, including the narrator in the western "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), Christopher Storm in the drama "Foreign Intrigue" (1951–1955) and Mr. Fantastic in the animated superhero series "Fantastic 4" (1967).

Mohr made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Willard Prescott in "Squeeze Play" (episode 152).  He guest-starred in virtually all of the other iconic westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973) and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969).

Montie Montana

Montie Montana was an American actor, stuntman, rodeo trick rider and cowboy.  He worked primarily in television; although, he had numerous uncredited roles in film.  Montana made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, playing a cowboy in "The Gaucho" (episode 14) and a stage driver in "Mail Order Groom" (episode 56).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he also appeared in the western series "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), again playing the part of the stagecoach driver.  In 1994, Montana was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Alberto Monte

Alberto Monte, born Alonzo Acevedo Gonzalez, was a Puerto Rican actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in 20 movies and television shows during a 10-year career.  Despite having had a short acting career, Monte was busy in the 1960s, guest-starring in popular television shows that included the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the sitcom "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the espionage series "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973) and "I Spy" (1965–1968), and the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Poco in "Baranca!" (episode 82).  He also guest-starred in the western "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.

Alex Montoya

Alex Montoya was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He had minor parts in a few notable films, including the drama "Crisis" (1950), starring Cary Grant and Jose Ferrer; the western "Escape from Fort Bravo" (1953), starring William Holden, Eleanor Parker and John Forsythe; and the western "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and Horst Bucholz.

Montoya guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the anthology series "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), "Thriller" (1960–1962) and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the espionage series "I Spy" (1965–1968), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970) and the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).  He also had a recurring role as Miguel Morales in the western "The High Chaparral" (1967–1971). 

Montoya made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ear Digger in "Waste" (episode 143).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Adventures of Kit Carson" (1951–1955), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975).

Ralph Moody

Ralph Moody was an American actor who appeared in over 50 movies and 100 television shows.  Often cast in Westerns as indians, his many television credits include "The Lone Ranger" (1949 1950), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1955–1959), "Dragnet" (1952 1959), "The Texan" (1959), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1958–1961), "Perry Mason" (1958–1964), "Gunsmoke" (1959–1966), "Dragnet 1967" (1967–1970) and "Bonanza" (1960 1971).

Moody appeared in 12 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jonathan Dodd in "The Visitor" (episode 58), Roy Merrick in "The Spoiler" (episode 61), and Eban Muchen in "The Hangman" (episode 76).  Moody also played the recurring character of Doc Burrage in nine episodes, including "Six Years and a Day" (episode 91), "The Actress" (episode 94), "Dark Day at North Fork" (episode 100), "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106), "Man From Salinas" (episode 130), "Quiet Night, Deadly Night" (episode 146), "Mark's Rifle" (episode 150), "Conflict" (episode 155), "Requiem at Mission Springs" (episode 164).

Joanna Moore

Agnes Moorehead

Agnes Moorehead was an American actress whose distinguished career spanned three decades.  She appeared in more than 70 films and numerous television series.  In her early career, she was a busy performer in radio.  Her first screen credits included Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane" (1941) and "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942). Moorehead was nominated for four Academy Awards and won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for "Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte" in 1964.  She also was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards and six Emmy's.   She won an Emmy Award for her role in the television series "Wild, Wild West" (1967).  Equally adept in dramatic and comedic roles, she is best-known for playing Endora, mother of Elizabeth Montgomery's character Samantha in the hit ABC television sitcom, "Bewitched" (1964-1972).  Moorehead made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the title role in "Miss Bertie" (episode 90).

Gloria Moreland

Gloria Moreland is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in eight movies and television shows during her brief career.  She has had a few minor film roles in B-movies, including the drama "The Rebel Set" (1959), starring Gregg Palmer, Kathleen Crowley and Edward Platt; and the science fiction film "The Phantom Planet" (1961), starring Dean Fredericks, Coleen Gray and Francis X. Bushman.  Moreland guest-starred in the anthology series "G.E. True Theater" (1953–1962).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the saloon girl in "Deadly Image" (episode 132).

Rex Morgan

Rex Morgan made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying McKeever in "Honest Abe" (episode 118).

Michael Morgan

Michael Morgan is an actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in 13 television shows during a career spanning just over a decade.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s, including the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959) and the anthology series "Schlitz Playhouse" (1951–1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Injun Adams in "The Sister" (episode 9).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Tombstone Territory" (1957), starring Pat Conway; and "Gunslinger" (1961), starring Tony Young.

Ben Morris

Ben Morris was an American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 20 movies and television shows over five years.  He lent his voice to more than 300 radio programs.  Fittingly, he portrayed the radio announcer in the noir film "Kiss Me Deadly" (1955), starring Ralph Meeker.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Dragnet" (1951–1959), as well as the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  Morris made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jimmy Carson in "One Went to Denver" (episode 25).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen.

Vic Morrow

Victor "Vic" Morrow was an American actor, director, screenwriter and producer whose career spanned nearly three decades.  He debuted in the film "Blackboard Jungle" (1955) following his signing with MGM.  Although his first major role was in film, Morrow was primarily a television actor, appearing in more than 30 different shows and made-for-TV films during his lifetime.  In 1963, Morrow received an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actor in a Series (Lead) for his recurring role as Sergeant Chip Saunders in the World War II television series "Combat!" (1962–1967).  He played a key role in the film "The Bad News Bears" (1976); however, he did not appear in the sequels.

Morrow appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Johnny Cotton in "The Angry Gun" (episode 12) and Brett Stocker in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50).  Much to his dismay, Morrow was typecast as the villain, appearing with Martin Sheen as the homicidal sheriff in the TV film "The California Kid" (1974).  On July 23, 1982, Morrow and two child actors were killed in an on-set accident during filming of John Landis' "Twilight Zone: The Movie" (1983).  The film was eventually released with the scene omitted.

Jeff Morrow

Jeff Morrow, born Leslie Irving Morrow, was an American stage, radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, Morrow worked as a commercial artist.  Beginning his career as a stage actor, he had significant stage experience in Shakespearean theater.  After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, Morrow played the title role in the Dick Tracy radio series, in addition to appearing in several Broadway productions.

Morrow had a few leading roles in film, including Exeter in the science fiction film "This Island Earth" (1955), also starring Faith Domergue and Rex Reason; and Dr. William Barton in the third and final installment of the "Creature from the Black Lagoon" horror film series, "The Creature Walks Among Us" (1956), also starring Rex Reason and Leigh Snowden; and he had a small part portraying Paulus in the Biblical epic "The Robe" (1953), starring Richard Burton, Jean Simmons, Victor Mature and Michael Rennie.

Morrow guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the spinoff series "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969).  He also had several recurring roles, including Bart McClelland in the western "Union Pacific" (1958) and Dr. Lloyd Axton in the comedy "The New Temperatures Rising Show" (1972–1974).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Reef Jackson in "End of the Hunt" (episode 162).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).

Arnold Moss

Arnold Moss was an American character actor of stage, radio, film and television, who was recognized for his distinctive deep, aristocratic voice.  He appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  Moss was an erudite man, earning both a Master's degree in French and a PhD in theater.  Trained as a Shakespearean theater actor, he taught drama at Brooklyn College for many years and even started his own Shakespearean theater company.  In addition to his various other pursuits, Moss created many of the crossword puzzles featured in the "New York Times" Sunday paper.  As a character actor, Moss specialized in crafting urbane villains of various ethnicities.  He had a few roles in memorable films, including Tasso in the comedy "My Favorite Spy" (1951), starring Bob Hope and Hedy Lamarr; The Doge in the comedy "Casanova's Big Night" (1954), starring Bobe Hope and Joan Fontaine; and Abdul in the crime caper "Gambit" (1966), starring Shirley MacLaine and Michael Caine.

Moss guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 60s, including the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Steven Griswold in "The Schoolmaster" (episode 86).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Kathleen Mulqueen

Kathleen Mulqueen was an American character actress, working primarily in film and television in the 1950's and 60's.  Her film appearances include the Paddy Chayefsky film, "Marty" (1955), "Texas Lady" (1955), "These Wilder Years" (1956), "The Outsider" (1962) and "The Night Walker" (1965).  She appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN—"The Sharpshooter" (the pilot episode) as Nancy Hanavan, "The Angry Gun" (episode 12) as Mrs. Peterson, "Eddie's Daughter" (episode 46) as Woman and "The Actress" (episode 94) as Judge Hanavan's wife/sister/daughter.  She appeared in dozens of television series of different genres, notably, playing the semi-regular character, Grandma Wilson, in "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963).

Ian Murray

Ian Murray made appearances in seven episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing the recurring character of Harley Hannabury in six, including "The Challenge" (episode 28), "Blood Brothers" (episode 35), "Obituary" (episode 44), "The Fourflusher" (episode 72), "Meeting at Midnight" (episode 74), and "The Illustrator" (episode 88).  He played a Townsman in "The Hangman" (episode 76).

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George N. Neise

George N. Neise was an American screen and television character actor who appeared in more than 120 movies and TV shows in a career spanning more than 35 years.  Although most of his big screen roles were uncredited in his early career, and he was typecast cast in war-time pictures playing soldiers, when he moved to television, he played parts in every genre.  He appeared in the most popular sitcoms of the 1960s, including "Green Acres" (1965–1971), "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), "The Addams Family" (1964–1966), "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971) and "Get Smart" (1965–1970).  Neise made multiple appearances in many TV series, including the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the sitcom "Mister Ed" (1957–1966), the western series "Death Valley Days" (1959–1970), the variety show "The Red Skelton Hour" (1962–1971), and the comic adventure series "Batman" (1966–1966).  He also had recurring roles in several TV shows, including Capitan Felipe Arrellanos in "Zorro" (1957–1961), Doctor Nat Wyndham in "Wichita Town" (1959–1960) and Colonel Thornton in "McKeever & the Colonel" (1962–1963).

Neise appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Roger Quenton in "Smoke Screen" (episode 68). Neise also guest-starred in many other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Cheyenne" (1995–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), and "Laramie" (1959–1963).

Jay Nelson

Jay Nelson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stagecoach driver in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).

Ed Nelson

Ed Nelson, born Edwin Stafford Nelson, is an American stage, film and television actor.  He has appeared in 185 movies and television shows during a career spanning 50 years.  He interrupted his undergraduate career at Tulane University, New Orleans, to spend two years studying at the New York School of Radio and Television Technique; however, at age 71 he returned to Tulane to complete his coursework and earn a degree.  While living and working in Los Angeles, Nelson was active in the Screen Actors Guild and was a board member for many years.  He remains a long-standing member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  He appeared in many films, including several Roger Corman horrors, such as "Attack of the Crab Monsters" (1957), "Teenage Cave Man" (1958), "Cry Baby Killers" (1959) and "A Bucket of Blood" (1959), as well as film classics, such as the historical WWII drama "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961), starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster and Richard Widmark, and the disaster epic "Airport 1975" (1974), starring Charlton Heston, Karen Black and George Kennedy.  He also appeared in the family adventure "For the Love of Benji" (1977) and the dramatic thriller "Runaway Jury" (2003), starring John Cusack, Rachel Weisz and Gene Hackman.  Nelson spent several years portraying President Harry Truman on stage, replacing James Whitmore in "Give 'Em Hell, Harry."

Nelson guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and "Jake and the Fatman" (1987–1992), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the sci-fi anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967) , the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the action undercover police series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family dynasty drama "Dallas" (1978–1991), and the Aaron Spelling action detective series "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981).  Nelson is best remembered for his portrayal of Michael Rossi in the primetime soap opera "Peyton Place" (1964–1969).  He also had another recurring role as Ward Fuller in the adventure series "The Silent Force" (1970–1971).

Nelson made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Stacy Beldon in "Dead Cold Cash" (episode 85), Jake Shaw in "The Illustrator" (episode 88) and Ben Varges in "First Wages" (episode 112).  He has guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Tommy Nolan

Tom Nolan, born Bernard Girouard, is a Canadian film and television actor, and also a writer.  He has appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than five decades.  He has written for several publications, including the "Los Angeles Times" and "Village Voice."

Nolan has had roles in various memorable films, including minor parts in the musical drama "A Star Is Born" (1954), starring Judy Garland and James Mason; the romantic drama "An Affair to Remember" (1957), starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr; the drama "Sweet Bird of Youth" (1989), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Mark Harmon and Valerie Perrine; and the superhero action drama "Batman Begins" (2005), starring Christian Bale, Micharl Caine, Ken Watanabe and Liam Neeson.   He also portrayed Johnnie Mulligan in the romantic comedy "Kiss Me, Stupid" (1964), starring Dean Martin, Kim Novak, Ray Walston and Felicia Farr; he played Vic in the romantic drama "The Grasshopper" (1969), starring Jacqueline Bisset, Jim Brown and Joseph Cotten; and he was cast as Vance in the romantic comedy "Pretty Woman" (1990), starring Richard Gere and Julia Roberts.   Nolan guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962) and the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967).  He also had a recurring role as Judy O'Connell in the western "Buckskin" (1958–1959).

Nolan was a child actor when he made his appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, appearing in one episode as the character Hab Carraway in "Guilty Conscience" (episode 137).  He guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Valora Noland

Valora Noland is an American actress who has worked primarily in television.  She has appeared in 18 movies and television shows during her 10-year career.  She studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena, California.  She played the role of Rhonda in the musical comedy "Beach Party" (1963), starring Robert Cummings, Dorothy Malone, Franky Avalon and Annette Funicello; she was cast as Vickie in the social drama "Sex and the College Girl" (1964), starring John Gabriel, Luana Anders and Charles Grodin; she starred as Diana in "Summer Children" (1965), co-starring Stuart Anderson and John Hanek, and she played Kate in the action western "The War Wagon" (1967), starring John Wayne, Kirk Douglas and Howard Keel.  She guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s and 70s, including the medical drama "Dr.  Kildare" (1961–1966), the family comedy "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975) and the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969).

Noland made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clare in "The High Country" (episode 122).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Henry Norell

Henry Norell was an American actor who appeared in 14 movies and television shows in a little over 15 years.  A few of his roles were uncredited.  He guest-starred in the family comedy starring a talking horse, "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the short-lived comedy series "Oh, Those, Bells" (1962), in which he had a recurring role as Henry Slocum, the family comedy "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), the crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and the family series "Lassie" (1954–1974).  Norell made one guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Henry Whitmore in "The Decision" (episode 116).  He also appeared in the western "The Tall Man" (1960–1962).

Hal Jon Norman

Hal Jon Norman was an American actor who primarily appeared in TV westerns.  He garnered more than 20 acting credits in a career spanning roughly 30 years.  He guest-starred in "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Tall Man" (1960–1962), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).  Norman made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the father in "The Pet" (episode 15) and Frost in "Seven" (episode 79).

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Warren Oates

Warren Oates was an American actor who began his acting career in 1957, starring in a live New York production of the television series "Studio One."  He moved to Los Angeles and appeared in numerous television western series.  Oates made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Andrew Shelton in "The Marshal" (episode 4), Jud Malackie in "Bloodlines" (episode 42), Santos in "The Prodigal" (episode 71), Marty Ryan in "Miss Milly" (episode 84), Will Breen in "Day of Reckoning" (episode 139).  He met Sam Peckinpah working on THE RIFLEMAN, which began a collaborative relationship on later film projects.  He was a prolific actor best-known for his roles in the Peckinpah classics, "The Wild Bunch" (1969) and "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia" (1974).  His most critically acclaimed role was playing GTO in the 1971 Monte Hellman cult classic "Two-Lane Blacktop."  Oates passed away in 1983 and a decade later, in 1993, Tom Thurman produced a documentary tribute film honoring his career, "Warren Oates: Across the Border."

Jerry Oddo

Jerry Oddo appeared in more than 20 movies and television shows in a brief six-year career.  He played the minor part of a Wade henchman in the western action adventure "3:10 to Yuma" (1957), starring Glenn Ford, Van Heflin and Felicia Farr.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "The Lawless Years" (1959–1961) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).

Oddo made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Schuette in "New Orleans Menace" (episode 10).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Bud Osborne

Bud Osborne, born Lennie B. Osborne in 1884, was a prolific American film and television actor, as well as a stuntman, working primarily in the western genre.  He appeared in more than 600 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 50 years.  He had a rugged, weather-beaten appearance, and so was typecast in outlaw roles.  He made his acting debut in silent films, starring in "Galloping Devil" (1921).  Among his several film roles were minor parts in the romantic comedy "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936), starring Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur; the western "Dodge City" (1939), starring Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Ann Sheridan and Bruce Cabot; the noir film "Stranger on the Third Floor" (1940), starring Peter Lorre; the western "Return of the Bad Men" (1948), starring Randolph Scott, Robert Ryan, Anne Jeffreys and George "Gabby" Hayes; and the crime drama "Please Murder Me" (1956), starring Angela Lansbury and Raymond Burr.

Osborne made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the hangman Taos in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6) and Loomis in "The Shattered Idol" (episode 120).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Cliff Osmond

Cliff Osmond, born Clifford O. Ebrahim, is a veteran American film and television actor, and also a drama teacher, producer, writer and director.  He has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He earned a Bachelor's degree in business administration from Dartmouth College and a Master's degree in the same field from UCLA.  Osmond wrote the screenplay for the film "The Penitent," which he also directed, starring Raul Julia and Armand Assante.  He was nominated for a Writer's Guild Award for an episode of the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977).  He is best known for his roles in the film comedies of director Billy Wilder, including his portrayal of the police sergeant in "Irma la Douce" (1963), the songwriter Barney Millsap in "Kiss Me, Stupid" (1964), and Purkey in "The Fortune Cookie" (1966) and "The Front Page" (1974).

Osmond guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the comedy "The Odd Couple" (1970–1975), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977), the crime drama "Kojak" (1973–1978), the cop drama "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–1979) and the murder mystery "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lafayette Blye in "None So Blind" (episode 135).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Robert Osterloh

Robert Osterloh was an American film and television actor who appeared in nearly 130 movies and television shows in a career spanning almost 25 years.  He made his film debut in "The Dark Past" starring Lee J. Cobb, William Holden and Nina Foch, and he went on to be cast in mostly uncredited or small roles in films representing a range of genres, including the crime drama "White Heat" (1949), starring James Cagney, the science fiction cult classic "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951), starring Michael Rennie and Patricia O'Neal, the historical biopic "Seven Angry Men" (155), starring Raymond Massey, and the horror thriller "I Bury the Living" (1958), starring Richard Boone.

Osterloh guest-starred in a wide variety of genres in television, including the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, the gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), starring Boris Karloff, the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack, and the off-beat sci-fi anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965).  Osterloh made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Walt Durkins in "A Time for Singing" (episode 64).  He guest-starred in a number of other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, as well as "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965) starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire as the wagon master.

Ted Otis

Ted Otis is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in 12 movies and television shows during his decade-long career.  He played the role of Dr. Ronnie Wood in the romantic drama "The Best of Everything" (1959), starring Hope Lange and Stephen Boyd, and he had a minor part in the crime caper "Ocean's Eleven" (1960), starring Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. and Peter Lawford.  He guest-starred in Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964).  Otis made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Elliot Hodgins in "The Surveyors" (episode 54).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.

Ollie O'Toole

Ollie O'Toole was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in nearly 90 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 30 years.  He guest-starred in many popular shows, including "The Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the family comedies "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968) and "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).

O'Toole made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Crabtree in "The Promoter" (episode 87).  He also guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon.

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James Parnell

James Parnell was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 80 films and television shows in just over a decade.  Although most of his major guest appearances were in westerns, he also guest-starred in the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the classic family comedy series of the 1950s, "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), and Boris Karloff's gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962).  Parnell made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the drunk in "The Blowout" (episode 43).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Parnell guest-starred in numerous other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brien, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, and "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen.

Milton Parsons

Milton Parsons, born Ernest Milton Parsons, was an American film and television character actor who tended to be typecast playing macabre eccentrics.  He appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  Many of his early roles were uncredited.  He guest-starred in an eclectic variety of shows, including the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the Boris Karloff 's gothic horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the action-adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine as a Shaolin Monk.  Parsons made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying A. Parker in "Letter of the Law" (episode 50) and the old man in "Strange Town" (episode 81).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Reg Parton

Regis "Reg" Parton was an American film and television actor, and also a stunt man.  He appeareed in nearly 60 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 40 years.  He did stunt work for iconic films that included Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of "Spartacus" (1960), Stanley Kramer's adventure comedy romp "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" (1963) and Mel Brooks' western comedy "Blazing Saddles" (1974).  He played minor parts in the science fiction film "This Island Earth" (1955), starring Jeff Morrow, Faith Domergue, Rex Reason and Lance Fuller, and in the musical "Never Steal Anything Small" (1959), starring James Cagney and Shirley Jones.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975).  Parton made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the victim in "The Bullet" (episode 163).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.

Michael Pate

Michael Pate, born Edward John Pate, was an Australian character actor of radio, film and television, as well as an accomplished writer, director and producer.  He appeared in more than 160 movies and television shows during his 55-year career.  Prior to acting, Pate worked as a writer and broadcaster for the Australian Broadcasting Commission, collaborating with George Ivan Smith on "Youth Speaks."  He spent the latter part of the 1930s working primarily in radio drama.  He also worked as a theatrical and literary critic, in addition to enjoying brief success as an author of short stories.  When World War II broke out, Pate enlisted in the Australian Army and served with the South West Pacific Area command.  As part of the 1st Australian Army Amenities Entertainment Unit, known as "The Islanders," he entertained Australian troops in various combat areas.

After the war ended, Pate not only resumed his work in radio, but ventured into films.  He had his first leading role in the adventure drama "Sons of Matthew" (1949), in which he portrayed Shane O'Riordan.  His other endeavors included adapting, producing and directing the plays "Dark of the Moon" and "Bonaventure" in 1950.  Later that year, he appeared in the American adaptation of "Bonaventure" for Universal Pictures, entitled "Thunder on the Hill" (1951), in which he performed opposite Claudette Colbert and Ann Blyth.  He appeared in many other films, portraying Browning in the action comedy "Ten Tall Men" (1951), starring Burt Lancaster; Talon in the horror film "The Strange Door" (1951), starring Charles Laughton and Borris Karloff; Flavius in the historical drama "Julius Caesar" (1953), starring Marlon Brando, James Mason and John Gielgud; Vittorio the Chiricahua Apache Chief in the action drama "Hondo" (1953), starring John Wayne; Sir Locksley in the adventure comedy "The Court Jester" (1956), starring Danny Kaye; Sir Ratcliffe in the historical drama "Tower of London" (1962), in which he had a starring role opposite Vincent Price; Lt. Reginald Evans in the biographical war drama "PT 109" (1963), starring Cliff Robertson; and Sierra Charriba in the Sam Peckinpah war film "Major Dundee" (1965), starring Charlton Heston and Richard Harris.  Later in his career, Pate wrote and directed the internationally acclaimed film adaptation of Colleen McCullough's "Tim" (1979), starring Piper Laurie and Mel Gibson, which garnered him the Best Screenplay Award from the Australian Writers Guild.

Pate guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the espionage adventure "The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (1964–1968), the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  He also had several recurring TV roles, including Salvador Quintana in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959); Chief Crazy Horse in "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; Chief Vittoro in the western "Hondo" (1967); and Detective Sgt. Vic Maddern in the drama "Matlock Police" (1971–1976).

Pate made five appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Xavier in "New Orleans Menace" (episode 10), Brad Davis in "The Second Witness" (episode 23), Pete Morgan in "The Visitor" (episode 58), Mogollan in "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106), Sanchez in "The Executioner" (episode 132).  He guest-starred in nearly all of the other notable westerns of the 1950s through 70s, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975).

Lee Patrick

Lee Patrick was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 45 years.  A veteran character actress, she played roles ranging from the "other woman" Maggie Biederhof in the noir film "Mildred Pierce" (1945), starring Joan Crawford, and the flinty Elvira Powell in the prison drama "Caged" (1950), co-starring Eleanor Parker and Agnes Moorehead, to the ditzy socialite Doris Uspon in the musical comedy "Auntie Mame" (1958).  Patrick is perhaps best-remember for her role as Henrietta Topper, wife of Cosmo Topper, played by Leo G. Caroll in the fantasy comedy series "Topper" (1953–1955).  Patrick guest-starred in the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack, and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Leota Carraway in "Guilty Conscience" (episode 137).  She also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire as the wagon master.

Hank Patterson

Hank Patterson, born Elmer Calvin Patterson in 1888, was an American actor and a musician.  He appeared in more than 170 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 20 years.  Before embarking on an acting career, Patterson worked as a travelling vaudeville piano player.   He was a veteran of World War II.  He worked primarily in television but had a few film roles, including a minor part in the romantic drama "Perfect Strangers" (1950), starring Ginger Rogers, and the science fiction films "Tarantula" (1955) and "Earth vs. The Spider" (1958).  He is best-remember for his recurring character Fred Ziffel in the comedy series "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970) and "Green Acres" (1965–1971).

Patterson guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).

Patteron made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Abe Merar in "The Debt" (episode 133).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Steve Pendleton

Steve Pendleton was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 55 years.  Often credited as Gaylord Pendleton, he began acting during the silent film era.  Most of his roles prior to the 1950s were in film and included the character Bobby in the romantic drama "Manslaughter" (1930), starring Claudette Colbert and Fredric March; Ensign Richard "Dick" Cabot in the war drama "Seas Beneath" (1931), starring George O'Brien; Dennis Daly in John Ford's drama "The Informer" (1935); Interne Jones in the romantic crime drama "Internes Can't Take Money" (1937), starring Barabara Stanwyck, Joel McCrea and Lloyd Nolan; a gas station attendant in the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), starring Henry Fonda; Captain Prescott in the romantic western "Rio Grande" (1950), starring John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara; and Charlie Ford in the western "Gunfire" (1950), starring Don "Red" Barry.

In addition to his work in film, Pendleton guest-starred in various popular TV shows, including the adventure series "Dangerous Assignment" (1952), the comedy "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" (1950–1958), the comic book hero action series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958) and "Batman" (1966–1968), the legal-crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the spy spoof comedy "Get Smart" (1965–1970), and the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968).  Pendleton made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Deputy Marshal Ben Johnson in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1956), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok" (1951–1958), starring Guy Madison, "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), starring Gail Davis, "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, in which he had a recurring role as Thacker, "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Ron Penfound

Ron Penfound, "Captain Penny," was an American television personality and radio announcer in Cleveland, Ohio.  He created the personae of Captain Penny in 1953 for a children's program that ran for 16 years.  The show featured a variety of regular live-action characters and thematic spots that aired on different days of the week and around the holidays.  The show was interspersed with "Little Rascals" and "Three Stooges" shorts.   In 1957, a second show, "Captain Penny's Fun House," was spun off to showcase Penfound's character.  Following a 1961 guest appearance by actor Chuck Connors, the radio personality was offered a small role in an episode of the fourth season episode of THE RIFLEMAN.   Penfound, credited as Ron Penford, portrayed Mr. Smith in "The Princess" (episode 125).

Gigi Perreau

Gigi Perreau, born Ghislaine Elizabeth Marie Thérèse Perreau-Saussine, is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in nearly 80 movies and television shows during a career spanning 70 years.  She made her film debut as the young daughter of scientist Marie Curie (portrayed by Greer Garson) in the biographical drama "Madame Curie" (1943), also starring Walter Pidgeon as Pierre Curie.  She was cast to play the role for her fluency in French.  At the age of ten, she was given the keys to the city of Pittsburgh for being the "top child movie actress of 1951," making her the youngest actress to receive the honor.  Like many actors who had successful careers as children Perreau struggled to maintain her popular appeal as an adult; although, her accomplishments were acknowledged later, including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (1960) and a Former Child Star Lifetime Achievement Award.

Most of Perreau's many film roles were minor, including an uncredited part in the war drama "The Seventh Cross" (1944), starring Spencer Tracy; Julie in the musical drama "Song of Love" (1947), starring Katharine Hepburn; the character Roberta Blaisdell in the comedy "Has Anybody Seen My Gal" (1952), starring Charles Coburn; Ellen in the romantic drama "There's Always Tomorrow" (1956), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray; and Susan Hopkins in the war drama "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" (1956), starring Gregory Peck, Jennifer Jones and Fredric March.

Perreau guest-starred in many television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the family comedies "My Three Sons" (1960–1972) and "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974), the war comedy "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969), and the police drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975).  She also played recurring roles as Pat Strickland in the comedy "The Betty Hutton Show" (1959) and Kathy Richards in the adventure series "Follow the Sun" (1961–1962).  Perreau made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Heller Chase in "Heller" (episode 62)and Carrie Battle in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Vic Perrin

Vic Perrin was an American actor who worked primarily in television, often doing voice acting.  He appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He began his career in radio, providing his voice for many shows, including various roles as "heavies" in the radio version of "Gunsmoke", for which he also authored at least one script.  He continued his voice work in television, lending his voice to various popular shows, including the animated series "Jonny Quest" (1964–1965), "Scooby Doo, Where Are You!" (1969–1972) and "Challenge of the SuperFriends" (1978), and also the sci-fi series "Star Trek" (1966–1969).  He also served as the narrator in Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of "Spartacus" (1960); however, he is best remembered for his role as the "Control Voice" in the sci-fi anthology "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965).  Perrin made appearances in many television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), and the western adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).  Perrin also had a few film roles, including the character Little Harry Goubenek in the noir film "The System" (1953), starring Frank Lovejoy, and Bar-M Rider in the western "Riding Shotgun" (1954), starring Randolph Scott.

Perrin made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ed Osborne in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  He guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Sergeant Preston of the Yukon" (1955–1958), for which he provided the narration, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Larry Perron

Larry Perron was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in nearly 20 movies and television shows in a career of just under 10 years.  He guest-starred in a few popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), and the suspenseful anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962).  He also had an uncredited role in the romantic adventure film "Timbuktu" (1959), starring Victor Mature and Yvonne De Carlo.

Perron made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dan Cameron in "Blood Brother" (episode 35), Eddie in "Baranca" (episode 82) and Sag in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  He guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Joseph V. Perry

Joseph V. Perry was an American film and television actor, who appeared in more than 160 movies and TV shows.  He received the 1949 Glenn Ford Award at Santa Monica High School and a UCLA Best Actor award in 1952.  Perry had a natural comedic talent and was a master of dialects, which garnered him steady work throughout his long career, which spanned more than 40 years.  Although he worked primarily in television, he appeared in several movies, including the Biblical epic "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965) and the comedy western "The Shakiest Gun in the West" (1968), starring Don Knotts.  He worked in every TV genre, including the popular sitcoms "Bewitched" (1964–1972), "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), "The Partridge Family" (1970–1974), "Seinfeld" (1990–1998) and "Barney Miller" (1974–1982); the crime dramas "Kojak" (1973–1978),"The F.B.I." (1965–1974) and "The Fugitive" (1963–1967); the medical dramas "Ben Casey" (1961–1966) and "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966); and several sci-fi thrillers, including "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965) and "The Invaders" (1967–1968).   Perry is probably best-known for his role as Nemo in "Everybody Loves Raymond" (1996–2005).

Perry appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tanner in "The Illustrator" (episode 88).  Perry appeared in many other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Johnny Ringo" (1959–1960), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).  He also guest-starred in Chuck Connors' later series "Branded" (1965–1966).

Michael Petit

Michel Petit is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than 40 years.  He guest-starred in the family comedies "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), in addition to the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), starring Vic Morrow as Sgt. Saunders, and the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen as a doctor wrongly convicted of murder.  Petit made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the young prince in "The Princess" (episode 125).  He also guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.  Pickard had the opportunity to co-star with Chuck Connors again in his later series "Branded" (1965–1966).

Marilee Phelps

Marilee Phelps, born Mary Lee Kukuck, was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in ten movies and television shows during a decade-long career.  She played the role of Virginia in the crime B-movie "Without Warning" (1952), starring Adam Williams and Meg Randall.  She guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges, and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray and Don Grady.  Phelps made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Miss Adams in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6).  She also guest-starred in the television western "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

William Phipps

William Phipps is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 50 years, working primarily in televsion in the science fiction and western genres.  He has had roles in several memorable films, including uncredited parts in the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy, Bill Mauldin, Douglas Dirk and Royal Dano, and in the post-World War II drama "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" (1956), starring Gregory Peck, Jennifer Jones and Fredric March.  He played the servant to Antony in the historical drama "Julius Caesar" (1953), starring Louis Calhern, Marlon Brando, James Mason and John Gielgud; and he portrayed Wash Perry in the science fiction film "The War of the Worlds" (1953), starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson  He lent his voice to the role of Prince Charming in the classic Disney animated feature "Cinderella" (1950).  In his only leading role, he played Michael in the sci-fi film "Five" (1951).  His last role prior to retiring was in the independent film "Sordid Lives" (2000), which he also produced.

Phipps guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983) and the murder mystery "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).

He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Asa Manning in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Phipps also guest-starred in Chuck Connors' later television series "Branded" (1965–1966).

John "Jack" Pickard

John Pickard was a prolific American film and television actor with over 200 screen credits in a career spanning 50 years.  His first acting roles were mostly uncredited small roles, beginning with "Mary of Scotland" (1936), in which he played a dueling soldier.  During World War II, Pickard served in the United States Navy.  He returned to acting after the war and continued to play supporting roles in scores of westerns and action dramas before being cast to play the leading role of Captain Shank Adams in the TV western "Boots and Saddles" (1957).  Although most recognizable in the western genre, Pickard made appearances in a wide variety of popular TV shows of the 1960s through the 1980s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb as Sgt. Joe Friday, "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), both starring Raymond Burr, in addition to Rod Serling's anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the espionage thriller, "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring Peter Graves, the action-adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), starring David Carradine as a Shaolin Monk, and the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), starring Melissa Gilbert and Michael Landon.

Pickard was ubiquitous in the popular TV westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including Dick Powell's "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.  Pickard also played the recurring role of Sgt. Major Murdock in 12 episodes of Gunslinger (1961).  He was almost cast as Marshal Dillon in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) when its was being developed for television in 1955, but according to the show's producer, Charles Marquis Warren, his screen tests with Miss Kitty generated no chemistry.  Despite missing out on the leading role, he did make 12 guest appearances in the long-running western.  Picard appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Stacey in "Death Trap" (episode 109).  He also appeared in six episodes of "Branded" (1965–1965), which gave him the opportunity to once again work with series star Chuck Connors.

Noam Pitlik

Noam Pitlik was an American film and television actor, and also director and producer.  He appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He had minor parts in a few memorable films, including the drama "A Child Is Waiting" (1963), starring Burt Lancaster and Judy Garland; and the 1960s counter-culture film "The Graduate" (1967), starring Dustin Hoffman, Anne Bancroft, Katharine Ross and William Daniels.

Pitlik guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s and 70s, including the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the musical comedy "The Monkees" (1966–1968), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the Sally Field comedy "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975) and the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977).  He had a few recurring roles in television, including Bentley in the comedy "I'm Dickens, He's Fenster" (1962–1963) and Officer "Swanny" Swanhouser in the comedy "Sanford and Son" (1972–1977).   He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Trooper Daft in "The Assailants" (episode 149).  He also guest-starred in the western "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

In 1975, after a successful career in acting, Pitlik moved behind the camera, directing 30 television shows, including the sitcoms "One Day at a Time" (1975–1984), "Mr. Belvedere" (1985–1990) and "Wings" (1990–1997).  In 1979, he received an Emmy award for "Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series" for his direction of the sitcom "Barney Miller" (1975–1982), starring Hal Linden.

Edward Platt

Edward Platt, born Edward Curthbert Platt, was an American character actor of stage, film and television, who appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He studied at the Juilliard School of Music in New York and spent time performing on Broadway, making his stage debut in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Allegro."   He appeared with Jose Ferrer in the Broadway production of Joseph Kramm's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "The Shrike" (1952) and made his movie debut in 1955 in a film adaption of the play, again appeared opposite Jose Ferrer.  He was known for his distinctive resonant voice, which suited the sophisticated roles he played.  He is best-remembered for his portrayal of "The Chief" in the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970).  Behind the camera, he produced the western film "Santee" (1973), starring Glenn Ford, which was one of the first independent color motion pictures recorded on videotape.

Platt had a minor part in the romantic war comedy "I was a Male War Bride" (1949), starring Cary Grant and Ann Sheridan.  He had a few other roles in memorable films, including Ray Fremick in the romantic drama "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955), starring James Dean, Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo; and Victor Larrabee in the Alfred Hitchcock's thriller "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason.  Platt guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the daytime drama "General Hospital" (1963–2007), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964) and the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965).  After his stint on "Get Smart, " Platt garnered another recurring role in the 1970 sitcom "The Governor and J.J. "

Platt made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Senator Borden in "The Assailants" (episode 149).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Preston Price

Preston Price made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the stagecoach driver in "Gun Fire" (episode 126).

Denver Pyle

Denver Pyle appeared in five episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Henry Trumble in "Bloodlines" (episode 42), Seth Mitchell in "Legacy" (episode 51), Harold Tenner in "The Hangman" (episode 76), George Tanner in "The Clarence Bibs Story" (episodes 104), and Frank Hazlitt in "The Decision" (episode 116).  Pyle was a highly recognizable character actor who worked in film and television, mostly in the 1950's through 1970's.  Frequently cast in westerns, he appeared in two classic John Ford films,"The Horse Soldiers," with William Holden, and "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance."  Pyle played recurring characters in several television series, including the role of Mad Jack in "The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams" (1977-1978; 36 episodes), Buck Webb, Doris Day's father, during the first two seasons of "The Doris Day Show" (1968-1970), and Briscoe Darling on The Andy Griffith Show.  Pyle's best-known television role may have been the hillbilly, Uncle Jesse Duke, in "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979-1985; 146 episodes).  In later life, Pyle made cameo appearances, notably 1994's "Maverick," with Mel Gibson and Jodie Foster, and the original Maverick, James Garner.

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Eddie Quillan

Eddie Quillan was an American actor whose career as a performer spanned more than 70 years.   Born in Philadelphia, his career began at age seven, first appearing in a vaudeville act, "The Rising Generation," with his siblings and later playing in a succession of silent films.  He had a natural gift for comedy and his vibrant personality and expressive face garnered Quillan mostly comedic parts and supporting roles.

Quillan's early film credits include "Big Money" (1930), "Girl Crazy" (1932), "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1935), "Young Mr. Lincoln" (1939) and "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940).  His later comedic turns included "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1965) and "How to Frame a Figg" (1971), both starring Don Knotts, and "Angel in My Pocket" (1969), starring Andy Griffith.  He appeared in scores of television shows, including "The Real McCoy," "Perry Mason," "The Addams Family," "Julia," "Mannix," "Lucas Tanner," "Here's Lucy," "Police Story," "Baretta," "Little House on the Prairie" and "Highway to Heaven."

Quillan appeared in THE RIFLEMAN twice in the fourth season playing Angus Evans, the Gunsmith—first in "Mark's Rifle" (episode 150), then in "Conflict" (episode 155).  He guest-starred in numerous other Westerns throughout much of his long career, including "Death Valley Days," "Gunsmoke," "The Guns of Will Sonnet," "Daniel Boone," "The Virginian," and "The Wild, Wild West."  Quillan made his last television appearance in Andy Griffith's show, "Matlock" in 1987.  He passed away in 1990.

Bill Quinn

Bill Quinn was an American actor whose early career began in the 1920's in silent films and ended with the 1989 science fiction film, "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier."  Perhaps, his best-known role was Mr. Ranseleer, Archie Bunker's blind friend in "All In The Family" (1971-1978).  He also was a regular character in the Carroll O'Connor spin-off, "Archie Bunker's Place."  Quinn's other television credits include roles in "The Odd Couple" (1970-1975), "McHale's Navy" (1962-1966), and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" (1970-1977), in which he play Mary Richard's father.  In 1971, he appeared in Universal Pictures' "How to Frame a Figg" starring Don Knotts.  Quinn was a regular character in THE RIFLEMAN, appearing in 40 episodes as Sweeney, the Owner/Bartender of the North Fork Saloon.

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Stuart Randall

Stuart Randall was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 140 movies and television shows during his 20-year career.  He had many film roles, including the sheriff in the western "Bells of Coronado" (1950), starring Roy Rogers; an uncredited role as Detective McGill in the drama "This Woman Is Dangerous" (1952), starring Joan Crawford; Pemberton in the western "Pony Express" (1953), starring Charlton Heston; an uncredited role as Joseph's elder in Cecile B. DeMille's Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring an ensemble cast led by Charlton Heston; the sheriff in "College Confidential" (1960), starring Steve Allen; and an uncredited role as McAlester in the western "True Grit" (1969), starring John Wayne and Kim Darby.

Although Randall worked primarily in the western genre, he also appeared in other notable television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the superhero action series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958) and the legal crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975).  He also had several recurring roles, including Sheriff Art Sampson in the western "Cimarron City" (1958–1960), starring George Montgomery; Rupe Prentice in the western "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; Sheriff Mort Corey in the western "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; and Lens Briggs in the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  Randall made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Curge Palmer in "The Gaucho" (episode 14) and Marshal Dixon in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  He guest-starred in nearly all of the other iconic westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Sue Randall

Sue Randall, born Marion Burnside Randall, was an American actress, appearing in nearly 60 movies and television shows during a career of 12 years.  She graduated with honors from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, New York.  In her only movie role, she played Ruthie Saylor in the romantic comedy "Desk Set" (1957), starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn.  Randall is best-remembered for her portrayal of Alice Landers in the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).

She guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s and 70s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the espionage thriller "I Spy" (1965–1968).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Lucy in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975).

John Rayborn

John Rayborn has appeared in nine television shows during a 20-year career.  He served in the U.S. Marines during World War II and was awarded a Purple Heart for injuries sustained during the Battle of Saipan.  He guest-starred in the detective drama "Burke's Law" (1963–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the private eye series "Cannon" (1971–1976) and the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977).  Rayborn made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Red Evans in "Death Never Rides Alone" (episode 147).  He also guest-starred in "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Rhodes Reason

Rhodes Reason is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He made his acting debut at age 18 in a production of "Romeo and Juliet," directed by Charles Laughton.  Among his film appearances were roles in "Yellowstone Kelly" (1959), starring Clint Walker, and the Vincent Sherman drama "A Fever in the Blood" (1961), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and Angie Dickenson.  He portrayed Daddy Warbucks in the Broadway musical "Annie" during the 1980s.

Reason guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969) and the espionage action adventure "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  He had several recurring television roles, including the leading role of John A. Hunter in the adventure series "White Hunter" (1957–1959) and Sheriff Will Mayberry in the dramatic series "Bus Stop" (1961–1962).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ben Todd in "Conflict" (episode 155).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Dick Rich

Dick Rich was an American television and film actor who appeared in nearly 200 movies (many uncredited) and television shows during a three-decade career.  He portrayed Dorcas' father in the musical western "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" (1954), starring Jane Powell, Howard Keel and Russ Tamblyn.  He also played minor parts in several films, including the biographical romance "The Adventures of Marco Polo" (1936), starring Gary Cooper, Sigrid Gurie and Basil Rathbone; the film adaption of John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), starring Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell and John Carradine; the western musical comedy "Belle of the Yukon" (1944), starring Randolph Scott, Gypsy Rose Lee and Dinah Shore; and the musical drama "Jailhouse Rock" (1957), starring Elvis Presley.

Rich guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Line Boss in "The Young Englishman" (episode 12).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Darryl Richard

Darryl Richard was an American television actor.  He appeared in 14 television shows in just over a decade.  He guest-starred in several popular shows, including "The Phil Silvers Show" (1956–1959), Rod Serling's anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the popular family comedy "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966), in which he played the recurring role of Smitty.  Richard made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fred in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).

Paul Richards

Paul Richards, born Paul Richard Levitt, was an American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 130 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He earned a Master's degree in theater from UCLA.  Among the films in which he appeared, Richards had minor roles in the historical drama "Demetrius and the Gladiators" (1954), starring Victor Mature, Susan Hayward and Michael Rennie; and the noir film "Kill Me Deadly" (1955), starring Ralph Meeker and Albert Decker.  He portrayed Trooper Perkins in the action western "War Paint" (1953), starring Robert Stack and Joan Taylor; and he played Rene the knife-thrower in the thriller "Phantom of the Rue Morgue" (1954), starring Karl Malden.  He also portrayed Mendez in the sci-fi film "Beneath the Planet of the Apes" (1970), starring James Franciscus, Kim Hunter, Maurice Evans and Linda Harrison.  His did voice work for many television commercials, including the iconic ad pitching the 1967 Pontiac GTO.

Richards guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage thriller "I Spy" (1965–1968) and the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970).  Although he tended to be typecast in villain roles, he starred as the compassionate and caring Dr. McKinley Thompson in the short-lived medical drama "Breaking Point" (1963–1964).  He also played the recurring role of Louis 'Louy' Kassoff in the 20s-era New York crime drama "The Lawless Years" (1959–1961).

Richards made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sam Morly in "The Trade" (episode 24).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Grant Richards

Grant Richards was an American actor whose career spanned the 1930's through the early 1960's.  He had numerous television credits and was a voice-over regular on the popular 1930's radio series "Gangbusters," which featured weekly episodes based on actual crime incidents.  Each program ended with various descriptions of wanted criminals, many of whom were later arrested due to avid listener participation.   Richards appeared in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Reed Barns in "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11), Dave Chester in "Gunfire" (episode 126), and John Keeler in "Tinhorn" (episode 134).

Danny Richards, Jr.

Danny Richards is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows in just over a decade.  He has guest-starred in a few popular shows, including the classic family comedy of the 1950s, "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  He also had a recurring role as Franklin Sanders in the short-lived drama "Willy" (1954–1955).  Richards made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Swifty Sullivan in "The Pitchman" (episode 80) and reprising that role in "Assault" (episode 102).

Steve Ritch

Steven Ritch was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in just over a decade.  He guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s, including the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges as an intrepid scuba diver, and the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), starring Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.  Ritch made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe Hyatt in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  Ritch guest-starred in many other popular westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Broken Arrow" (1956–1960), in which he had a recurring role as Nukaya, "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), starring Lee Aaker and James Brown, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire as the wagon master.

Bartlett Robinson

Bartlett "Bart" Robinson was an American radio, stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 130 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  As a young actor, Robinson divided his time between performing on stage in New York and working in radio and film in Los Angeles.  He was a regular on the last major network radio show "Yours Truly Johnny Dollar," which ended in 1962.  Among his career highlights, Robinson was the voice of Perry Mason (1943) during radio's Golden Age; he portrayed Benjamin Frank Mahoney in the biographical drama "The Spirit of St. Louis" (1957), starring James Stewart and Murray Hamilton; and he appeared in "To Serve Man" (1962), one of the most popular episodes in the iconic Rod Serling anthology "The Twilight Zone."

Bartlett guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973) and the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970).

Robinson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Samuel Britton in "Outlaw's Inheritance" (episode 38).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Ziva Rodann

Ziva Rodann is a Palestinian actress who has worked primarily in television.  She has appeared in 50 movies and television shows during her 16-year career.  Most of her film roles were minor, including uncredited parts in the war drama "China Gate" (1957), starring Gene Barry, Angie Dickinson and Nat King Cole, and the film adaptation of Fyodor Dostoevsky's "The Brothers Karamazov" (1958), starring Yul Brynner, William Shatner and Richard Basehart; Mrs. Catherine Morgan in the western thriller "Last Train from Gun Hill" (1959), starring Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn; and Gogo Lazlo in the drama "College Confidential" (1960), starring Steve Allen.

Rodann guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the espionage adventure series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968), in which she appeared twice portraying ancient Egyptian queen Nefertiti.  Rodann made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Maria in "Vaqueros" (episode 111).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

David M. Rodman

David M. Rodman appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Merar in "First Wages" (episode 112).

Teddy Rooney

Teddy Rooney, born Ted Michael Rooney, is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in 12 movies and television shows in five years.  His father is the famed actor Mickey Rooney.  He portrayed Billy Osgood in the comedy "It Happened to Jane" (1959), starring Dorris Day, Jack Lemmon, Ernie Kovacs and Steve Forest.  He guest-starred in the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the war comedy "McHale's Navy" (1962–1966).  Rooney made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Woody in "The Long Goodbye" (episode 119).  He also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Fay Roope

Fay Roope was an American character actor, born Winfield Harding Roope.  Beginning in the 1920's he was primarily a stage actor, appearing both off and on Broadway for nearly 30 years.  In the 1950's until his death in 1961, he worked primarily in film and television.  His film credits include roles in "From Here To Eternity" (1953, uncredited), the Gary Cooper comedy "You're in the Navy Now" (1951, uncredited), and the original version of the science-fiction classic film "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951, uncredited) and "Viva Zapata" (1952) and "Ma and Pa Kettle at Waikiki" (1955).  Roope also guest-starred in numerous television series, including "Mr. & Mrs. North" (1952–1953), "Dragnet" (1958), "Perry Mason" (1958) and "Twilight Zone" (1960).  He also appeared in many of the drama anthology shows during the Golden Age of television.

Roope made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jeff Stacey in "The Brother-In-Law" (episode 5), Baynes Barton in "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49), and he was one of six actors to play the recurring character of Doc Burrage—Roope portrayed Doc Burrage in "Panic" (episode 47) and "The Legacy" (episode 51).  He was a recognizable veteran actor in Westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1954), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1958), "The Adventures of Jim Bowie" (1957–1958), "Gunsmoke" (1959), in which he played the recurring character Mr. Botkin, "Bonanza" (1959), "The Texan" (1958–1960), "Rawhide" (1959) and "Cheyenne" (1960).

Tony Rosa

Tony Rosa appeared in four movies and television shows in a decade-long career.  He portrayed a gambler in the film adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man and the Sea" (1958), starring Spencer Tracy.  He also had a minor part in the musical comedy "Guys and Dolls" (1955), starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra and Vivian Blaine.  In television, he guest-starred in the crime drama "Checkmate" (1960–1962).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Horse Teeth Looker in parts 1 and 2 of "Waste" (episodes 143 and 144).

Henry Rowland

Henry Rowland was an American actor who appeared in more than 175 films and television shows, frequently appearing in uncredited roles.  Among the many films in which he appeared, Rowland had small parts in the Humphrey Bogart-Ingrid Berman classic film, "Casablanca" (1942, uncredited), John Huston's "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950, uncredited), Lew Landers' "Captain John Smith and Pocahontas" (1953), the Gore Vidal film adaptation starring Paul Newman, "The Left Handed Gun" (1958, uncredited), the film adaptations of bestselling novels by Jacqueline Susann, "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls" (1970), and Irving Wallace, "The Seven Minutes" (1971), and he appeared in the James Bond franchise feature film, "Diamonds Are Forever" (1971, uncredited).   The Harrison Ford and Gene Wilder comedy "The Frisco Kid" (1979), was Rowland's last film.

Rowland appeared in just one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, "The Babysitter" (episode 52), in which he played Nels (Swenson/Svenson), the Blacksmith.  He was one of seven actors to play the recurring character.  He also appeared in numerous other television shows, especially Westerns, including multiple guest spots in "The Cisco Kid" (1952–1955), "Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok" (1952–1955), "The Roy Rogers Show" (1953–1957), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956) and "Buffalo Bill, Jr." (1955–1956), "Zorro" (1958), and "Gunsmoke" (1962–1964).

Steve Rowland

Steve Rowland, born Stephen Jacob Rowland, is an American television and film actor, in addition to being a singer, columnist and record producer.  During the 1960s, Rowland relocated to London, where he produced 13 Top Ten hits for Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich.  He also produced hits for P.J. Proby and The Pretty Things.  He received a gold album and an award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers during the 1970s.  While serving as the creative manager for Ariola Records, Rowland discovered and signed The Cure and the Thompson Twins, in addition to handling Boney M and Japan.

Rowland had several film roles, including an uncredited role in the romantic western "The Moonlighter" (1953), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray; Glasses in the crime drama "Crime in the Streets" (1956), starring John Cassavetes, Sal Mineo and James Whitmore; and Eddy in the war drama "Battle of the Bulge" (1965), starring Henry Fonda, Robert Shaw, Robert Ryan and Dana Andrews.  Outside of film, Rowland has appeared almost exclusively in westerns, including having a recurring role as Phin Clanton in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian.  Rowland made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Billy Lehi in "Home Ranch" (episode 2) and Buddy Link in "The Coward" (episode 53).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Herman Rudin

Herman Rudin was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in nearly 50 television shows during a career of more than 20 years.  Among his few movie roles, he had a minor uncredited part in the western "From Noon Till Three" (1976), starring Charles Bronson.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965) and the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Morgan Bailey in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.

Herbert Rudley

Herbert Rudley was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He attended Temple University until he received a scholarship to study at Eva Le Gallienne's Civic Repertory Theatre.  In 1931, he made his Broadway debut in "Did I Say No."  He appeared in various other productions, including "The Threepenny Opera," "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" and "Macbeth."  He subsequently portrayed Seth Gale in the film adaptation of "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" (1940), starring Raymond Massey, Gene Lockhart and Ruth Gordon.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his recurring role as attorney Herb Hubbard, husband of Eve Arden, in the sitcom "The Mothers-in-Law" (1967–1969).

Rudley had roles in several memorable films, including captain of the guard in the adventure comedy "The Court Jester" (1956), starring Danny Kaye, Glynis Johns, Basil Rathbone and Angela Lansbury; and Capt. Colclough in the war drama "The Young Lions" (1958), starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, Dean Martin and Hope Lange.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).

Rudley also had several recurring roles, including Sam Brennan in the western "The Californians" (1957–1959) and Howard Baker in the daytime drama "Dallas" (1978–1991).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Gorman in "The Indian" (episode 21) and Captain James Gordon in "A Case of Identity" (episode 57).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Bing Russell

Bing Russell, born Neil Oliver Russell, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 40 years.  He is the father of actor Kurt Russell.  In addition to his acting pursuits, Russell was the owner of the Portland Mavericks, a minor league baseball team.  He created a baseball park without corporate sponsorship and hired the first female general manager in professional baseball.

Russell had roles in several memorable films, including Robert in the western "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and James Coburn.  He portrayed Vernon Presley in the biographical drama "Elvis" (1979), starring Kurt Russell and Shelley Winters; he played the van driver in the action comedy "Tango and Cash" (1989), starring Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell; and he was a Club Ritz patron in the superhero action movie adaptation of "Dick Tracy" (1990), starring Warren Beatty.  He had minor parts in many films, including the noir film "Kiss Me Deadly" (1955), starring Ralph Meeker and Albert Dekker; the western "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral" (1957), starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas; and the western drama "Rio Bravo" (1959), starring John Wayne, Dean Martin and Ricky Nelson.

Russell guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the comedy "Hazel" (1961–1966), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967) and the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967).

Russell made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hode Evans in "A Matter of Faith" (episode 34) and Sanchez in "Seven" (episode 79).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Richard Rust

Richard Rust was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows during a career of nearly 35 years.  He began his career in the theater, replacing another actor in Eugene O'Neill's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama "Long Day's Journey into Night" (1956), in which he performed alongside Fredric March and Florence Eldridge.  He had a few film roles, including the part of a country boy in the western "The Legend of Tom Dooley" (1959), starring Michael Landon; Dobie in the western "Comanche Station" (1960), starring Randolph Scott; Oliver in the drama "Walk on the Wild Side" (1962), starring Laurence Harvey and Jane Fonda; and Pisco in the drama "The Last Movie" (1971), starring Dennis Hopper.

Rust guest-starred in a variety of popular television shows, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the short-lived drama series "Sam Benedict" (1962–1963), in which he had a recurring role as Hank Tabor, and the action series "The Rat Patrol" (1966–1968).  Rust made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Brice Hornsby in "The Quiet Fear" (episode 127).  He guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Glenn Ryle

Glenn Ryle was a television personality in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He served in the United States Marines during World War II and was recalled to active duty during the Korean War.  In the interim, Ryle worked as a civilian advisor for the Israeli military while the territory was being developed.  He is best-remembered for hosting "The Skipper Ryle Show," a very popular children's show.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ed the townsman in "First Wages" (episode 112).

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Walter Sande

Walter Sande was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 250 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, Sande worked as a musical director for 20th-Century Fox's theater chain.  He had roles in several memorable films, including Mr. Gillespie, Jr. in the comedy "You Can't Fool Your Wife" (1940), starring Lucille Ball and James Ellison; he portrayed Johnson in the romantic adventure "To Have and to Have Not" (1944), starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall; he played Art Jansen in the romantic drama "A Place in the Sun" (1951), starring Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters; and he was cast as Sam in the western thriller "Bad Day at Black Rock" (1955), starring Spencer Tracy, Robert Ryan and Anne Francis.

Sande also had minor parts in many other films, including the action crime adventure "The Green Hornet Strikes Again!" (1940), starring Warren Hull and Keye Luke; the iconic Orson Welles classic "Citizen Kane" (1941); the comedy-drama "Tortilla Flat" (1942), starring Spencer Tracy and Hedy Lamarr; and the science fiction classic "The War of the Worlds" (1953), starring Gene Barry.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), and the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).

Sande had a recurring role as Captain Horatio Bullwinkle in the adventure comedy "The Adventures of Tugboat Annie" (1957).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ralph Haven in "The Guest" (episode 165).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Hugh Sanders

Hugh Sanders was an American actor who worked primarily in television.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during a career of two decades.  He portrayed Charlie Thomas in the drama "The Wild One" (1953), starring Marlon Brando.  He had minor parts in a few other memorable films, including the musical drama "Jailhouse Rock" (1957), starring Elvis Presley, and the film adaptation of "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962), starring Gregory Peck.

Sanders guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the comedy "Hazel" (1961–1966), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the family comedy "The Addams Family" (1964–1966) and the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967).

Sanders made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, potraying Ben Waller in "The Blowout" (episode 43).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

William Schallert

William Schallert is a prolific American film, television and voice actor.  He has appeared in 360 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 60 years.  He is the son of the late Edwin Schallert, a former drama editor of the "Los Angeles Times" and the dean of West Coast critics.  After graduating from UCLA, Schallert began working with the Circle Theater, where he would eventually become one of the owners.  He was also the president of the Screen Actors Guild from 1979 to 1981.  He remains actively involved the Guild and has said that he has no plans to retire.  He is best known for his portrayal of Martin Lane in the family comedy "The Patty Duke Show" (1963–1966).

Schallert has appeared in numerous films, including playing several uncredited parts in classic films, including a gas station attendent in the adventure drama "Mighty Joe Young" (1949), starring Terry Moore and Ben Johnson; a Union soldier in the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy and Bill Mauldin; a messenger on screen in the musical comedy "Singin' in the Rain" (1952), starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds; an ambulance attendant in the sci-fi horror "Them!" (1954), starring James Whitmore and Edmund Gwenn; a Union lieutenant in the romantic drama "Band of Angels" (1957), starring Clark Gable and Yvonne De Carlo; Doctor Arthur Bramson in the sci-fi thriller "The Incredible Shrinking Man" (1957), starring Grant Williams; Harry in the western drama "Lonely Are the Brave" (1962), starring Kirk Douglas; Judge Herman Spicer in the western "Hour of the Gun" (1967), starring James Garner, Jason Robards and Robert Ryan; and Horn in the dramatic comedy "Teachers" (1984), starring Nick Nolte.

Schallert has guest-starred in many popular television shows in virtually every major genre, including the family comedies "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the legal dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Ironside" (1967–1975), the family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1974) and "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the iconic sci-fi series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the western action adventure series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), the comedy "Maude" (1972–1978), the crime action adventure "Magnum, P.I." (1980–1988), and most recently, the romantic comedy "How I Met Your Mother" (2005–present) and the dramatic comedy "Desperate Housewives" (2004–present).  His credits as a voice actor include the animated series "Smurfs" (1981–1990) and "What's New, Scooby-Doo?" (2002–present).

Schallert has also played many recurring roles, including Herbert in the comedy "Hey, Jeannie!" (1956–1957), Justinian Tebbs in the western "The Adventures of Jim Bowie" (1956–1958), Major Karl Richmond in the adventure series "Steve Canyon" (1958–1960), Lieutenant Manny Harris in the Raymond Chandler crime drama "Phillip Marlowe" (1959–1960), Mr. Leander Pomfritt in the family comedy "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), Admiral Hargade in the Buck Henry spy spoof, "Get Smart" (1965–1970), Carson Drew in the family mystery series "The Nancy Drew Mysteries" (1977–1979), Stanley Perkins in the long-running family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), Russell "Russ" Lawrence in the comedy "The New Gidget" (1986–1988), and Mayor Norris in the fantasy drama "True Blood" (2008–present).  He made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fogarty in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40), Marshal Truce in "Strange Town" (episode 81), and Joe Lovering in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103).  He has guest-starred in many other classic westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Stefan Schnabel

Stefan Schnabel was a German radio, stage, television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows during a career spanning 50 years.  He was the son of the famed classical pianist Artur Schnabel.  He and his family fled Germany when the Nazis came to power in 1933.  As a stage actor, he often portrayed professionals (i.e. military officers, teachers, etc.) in plays by Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Gorky and Schnitzler.  While residing in London, he began acting at the Old Vic, where he worked with John Gielgud, Charles Laughton and Maurice Evans, and also appeared opposite Laurence Olivier in "Hamlet."  After he immigrated to America in 1938, Schnabel not only appeared in thousands of radio programs, but also worked frequently on Broadway, including playing the role of Metellus Climber in Orson Welles' "Blackshirt" rendition of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," which was set in Fascist Italy and featured Welles in the role of Brutus.  Schnabel's acting career was interrupted while he served in the United States Army with the Office of Strategic Services.  He is best-remembered for his portrayal of Dr. Stephen Jackson in the CBS soap opera "The Guiding Light" (1965–1981).

Schnabel was cast in minor parts in several notable films, including the translator for the ship's captain in the noir film "Journey Into Fear" (1943), starring Orson Welles; Zeno in the drama "Two Weeks in Another Town" (1962), starring Kirk Douglas and Edward G. Robinson; Andrei Krupitzyn in the drama "The Ugly American" (1963), starring Marlon Brando; the first secretary in the Clint Eastwood thriller "Firefox" (1982); and a party guest in the romantic comedy "Green Card" (1990), starring Gerard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell.  He guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962).  He also had a recurring role as Firebeard in the adventure series "Tales of the Vikings" (1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the title character in "Old Tony" (episode 168), the last episode of the series.

Sydna Scott

Sydna Scott, born Sydna MacFetridge, was an American film, stage and television actress.  On Broadway, she appeared in "The Man Who Came to Dinner," "He Who Gets Slapped" and "The Native Son," which was directed by Orson Welles. She appeared in just 12 movies and television shows in a career spanning more than four decades.  Her film roles included Angela in the sci-fi film "Crack in the World" (1965), starring Dana Andrews; Mrs. Johnson in the action film "10 to Midnight" (1983), starring Charles Bronson; Sara Beecham in the action film "Messenger of Death" (1988), starring Charles Bronson; and a bit part (the second woman in the shelter) in the comedy "Scrooged" (1988), starring Bill Murray.  In television, she guest-starred in the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960) and the murder mystery "Danger" (1950–1955); however, she is best remembered for portraying Helen Davis opposite husband Jerome Thor in the detective series "Foreign Intrigue" (1951–1955).  They are credited with having been the first trench-coat wearing detectives on television, and one of their signature macs is preserved in the Smithsonian Institution.   Scott made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mary Halpern in "Tension" (episode 45).

Vito Scotti

Vito Scotti was an American actor who appeared in more than 200 film and television programs spanning 46 years.  He was born into an Italian family and spent his childhood in Naples.  His career as a performer began playing in night clubs.  His first film role (uncredited) was in "Illegal Entry" (1949).  Scotti became well-known as a versatile character actor—a man with a thousand faces.  Equally adept playing comedic and dramatic parts, he frequently was cast in ethnic roles.  Scotti appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Alphonso in the two-part program "Waste" (episodes 143 and 144), Soto in "The Sixteenth Cousin" (episode 159), and Marcello Chabini in "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167).

Alexander Scourby

Alexander Scourby was an American stage, film, television and voice actor.  He appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows during his 35-year career.  He got his start on the stage with an apprenticeship at Eva Le Gallienne's Civic Repertory Theatre in Manhattan.  Together with other actors, Scourby helped to establish the Apprentice Theatre, which presented plays at the New School for Social Research in New York City from 1933–1934.   He was also one of the founders of the drama company New Stages, which presented productions from 1947–1948.  His first Broadway role was the player king in Leslie Howard's production of "Hamlet."  He would go on to have many significant roles, including Razumikhin in Rodney Ackland's dramatization of "Crime and Punishment" at the National Theatre in New York.  Despite receiving accolades for his stage work, Scourby is best remembered for his deep and resonant voice heard narrating a wide variety of media, including commercials, documentaries and radio serials.  He broadcast in Greek and English for the Office of War Information during World War II.  His greatest accomplishment was his narration of the King James version of the Bible, which was commissioned originally by the American Foundation for the Blind.

Some of his film roles include Max Fabian in the noir film "Affair in Trinidad" (1952), starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford; Mike Lagana in the crime drama "The Big Heat" (1953), starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame; Old Polo in the epic drama "Giant" (1956), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean; Dr. Mihail Andrassy in the family comedy "The Shaggy Dog" (1959), starring Fred MacMurray; and Evans in the comedy horror film "The Stuff" (1985), starring Michael Moriarty, Andrea Marcovicci, Garrett Morris and Paul Sorvino.  In television, he appeared primarily in drama series, including "Omnibus" (1952–1961), "Studio One in Hollywood" (1948–1958), "Kraft Theatre" (1947–1958) and "The United States Steel Hour" (1953–1963), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975).  Scourby made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Byron Claremont in "Obituary" (episode 44).  He guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Jack Searl

Jack Searl, born John E. Searl, was an American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 90 movies and television shows during his 40-year career, frequently credited as Jackie Searl.  He began acting as a child and was typecast as "the brat."  He was a familiar face during the 1930s, having roles in several films based on classic novels, including Sid Sawyer in both "Tom Sawyer" (1930) and "Huckleberry Finn" (1931), starring Jackie Coogan (appearing in his last film roles), the child actor famous for his roles in Charlie Chaplin's silent movies; Dormouse in "Alice in Wonderland" (1933), starring Richard Arlen and Charlotte Henry Herbert; and he appeared in "Great Expectations" (1934), starring Phillip Holmes.  Other roles as a child actor included Sidney in the family comedy "Skippy" (1931), starring Jackie Cooper, and Tom in the family drama "Little Lord Fauntleroy" (1936), starring Freddie Bartholomew and Mickey Rooney.

Following his service during World War II, Searl experienced difficulty reviving his acting career.  He landed the role of Jasper Martin in the western "The Paleface" (1948), starring Bobe Hope and Jane Russell, and he tried to develop as a character actor, mostly playing heavies, but establishing a successful career in film was elusive.  He fared better in television, guest-starring in many popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the comedy "The Jack Benny Program" (1950–1965), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the suspense series "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" (1962–1965), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the comedy series "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970).

Searl made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tom in "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106).  He guest-starred in several other prominent westerns, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), starring Walter Brennan and Dack Rambo, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Charles Seel

Charles Seel, born Charles Frederick Seel, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in 130 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He had several film roles, most of them minor, including uncredited roles in the family comedy "Please Don't Eat the Daisies" (1960), starring Doris Day and David Niven; the romantic comedy "Donovan's Reef" (1963), starring John Wayne; and the action drama "Winning" (1969), starring Paul Newman; as well as the part of a bellhop in the Michael Crichton sci-fi thriller "Westworld" (1973), starring Yul Brynner, Richard Benjamin and James Brolin.

Seel guest-starred in a wide variety of popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Mannix" (1967–1975) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the drama anthology series "The Loretta Young Show" (1953–1961), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the espionage adventure series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the classic sci-fi series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the legal drama "Ironside" (1967–1975), and the medical drama "Marcus Welby, M.D." (1969–1976).  He also had a few recurring roles, including the bartender in the western "Tombstone Territory" (1957), Mr. Krinkie in the family comedy "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), and Tom Pride in the western "The Road West" (1966–1967).

Seel made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Barney the storekeeper in "The Boarding House" (episode 22), a role that he reprised in "The Mind Reader" (episode 40).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Sarah Selby

Sarah Selby was an American actress who worked primarily in television.  She appeared in 120 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  She appeared in several uncredited film roles, including Mrs. Hawkins in the comedy "The Naughty Nineties" (1945), starring Bud Abbott and Lou Costello; and a Texas woman in the western "The Fabulous Texan" (1947), starring Bill Elliott.  Despite receiving mostly minor parts, Selby demonstrated versatility as an actress, performing in shows in every major television genre, including the family comedies "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), in which she had a recurring role as Miss Thomas, "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966), "My Three Sons" (1960–1972) and "Family Affair" (1966–1971); the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975); the comedies "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" (1950–1958), in which she had a recurring role as Lucille Vanderlip, "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963) and "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970); the family mystery series "The Hardy Boys: The Mystery of the Applegate Treasure" (1956), in which she had a recurring role as Aunt Gertrude, a role that she reprised in the film "The Hardy Boys: The Myster of the Ghost" (1957); the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).

Selby made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Agnes Hamilton in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).  She guest-starred in numerous other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "The Restless Gun" (1957–1959), starring John Payne, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, in which she had a recurring role as Ma Smalley.

Marion (Marian) Seldes

Marian Seldes is an American radio, stage, film and television actress.  She has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during her 60-year career.  She studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City and made her Broadway debut in a production of "Medea" (1948).  Her career highlights and accolades as a stage performer include being elected to the American Theatre Hall of Fame and being a member of the Juilliard School of Performing Arts (1969–1972); a Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performance in "A Delicate Balance" (1967); a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Performance in "Father's Day" (1971); an Outer Circle Critics Award for Best Actress in a Play for "Painting Churches" (1983); and a Tony Lifetime Achievement Award (2010).  She also earned a nod from the "Guinness Book of World Records" for being the "most durable actress," having appeared in every one of the 1,809 Broadway performances of Ira Levin's play "Deathtrap," which premiered in 1978.  Her students include Robin Williams, Kelsey Grammer and Kevin Kline.

In addition to her success on stage, Seldes also has been featured prominently in radio and film.  She appeared in nearly 180 episodes of the "CBS Radio Mystery Theater. "  Some of her film roles include Rowena Cobb in the biographical action film "The True Story of Jesse James" (1957), starring Robert Wagner; Herodias in the Bible epic "The Greatest Story Ever Told" (1965), starring Max von Sydow; Ruth in the crime drama "Fingers" (1978), starring Harvey Keitel; Alma Pittman in the mystery drama "Affliction" (1997), starring Nick Nolte, Sissy Spacek and James Coburn; President Jocelyn Carr in the romantic drama "Mona Lisa Smile" (2003), starring Julia Roberts; and Barbara in the crime drama "The Visitor" (2007), starring Richard Jenkins.

Seldes has guest-starred in many popular television shows, especially in her early career, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Law & Order" (1990–2010), the drama series "Studio One in Hollywood" (1948–1958), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and the short-lived comedy series "Good & Evil" (1991), in which she had a recurring role as Charlotte Sandler; and the mystery whodunit "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).  Seldes made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hazel, the apparition of Mark McCain's mother, in "The Vision" (episode 66).  This is the only episode in THE RIFLEMAN's five seasons in which the mother of Mark/wife of Lucas appears.  Seldes guest-starred in a few other westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, and "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.

Joan Shawlee

Joan Shawlee, also credited as Joan Fulton, was an American film and television actress.  She apppeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  She had roles in several memorable films, including Sylvia Hunter in the comedy "Buck Privates Come Home" (1947), starring Bud Abbott and Lou Costello; Sweet Sue in the comedy "Some Like It Hot" (1959), starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon; Sylvia in the romantic comedy "The Apartment" (1960), starring Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine and Fred MacMurray; and Amazon Annie in the horror film "Willard" (1971), starring Bruce Davison, Elsa Lanchester and Sondra Locke; as well as minor parts in the musical drama "A Star Is Born" (1954), starring Judy Garland and James Mason, and the crime thriller "Farewell, My Lovely" (1975), starring Robert Mitchum, Charlotte Rampling, John Ireland and Sylvia Miles.

Shawlee guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the comedy "Hazel" (1961–1966), the crime drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977) and the cop thriller "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–1979).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mary Woodson in "Lonesome Bride" (episode 108).  She also guest-starred in the western "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner.

Dan Sheridan

Dan Sheridan, born Daniel Marvin Sheridan, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He had minor parts in film, including the biographical western "The Left-Handed Gun" (1958), starring Paul Newman, and the western drama "Lonely Are the Brave" (1962), starring Kirk Douglas, Gena Rowlands and Walter Matthau.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964) and the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963).

Sherdian made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Sheriff McVey in "The Trade" (episode 24).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961); starring Gene Barry, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Fred Sherman

Fred Sherman, born Clarence E. Kolegraff, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He had minor parts in a few films, including the noir film "Lady in the Lake" (1947), starring Robert Montgomery, Lloyd Noland and Audrey Totter; the biographical western "The Left-Handed Gun" (1959), starring Paul Newman; and the comedy "Some Like It Hot" (1959), starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon.

Sherman guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tom the telegraph operator in "The Man from Salinas" (episode 130).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Mickey Simpson

Mickey Simpson appeared in THE RIFLEMAN pilot episode, "The Sharpshooter," as Carl Lamprey.  He also appeared in "The Indian" (episode 21) as Tub.  Over his long career in film and television, he appeared in many westerns, frequently cast as the villain.

Pam Smith

Pam Smith appeared in five movies and television shows in four decades.  She portrayed Maureen Beebe in the family drama "Misty" (1961), starring David Ladd, and Mrs. Stewart in the family drama "Owd Bob" (1998), starring James Cromwell, Colm Meaney and Jemima Rooper.  She guest-starred in the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  Smith made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the young girl Susan in "Honest Abe" (episode 118).  She also guest-starred in the western "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Duke Snider

Duke Snider was born in Los Angeles, California.  Nicknamed "The Silver Fox" and "The Duke of Flatbush," he is a former Major League baseball center fielder and left-handed batter who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers, as well as the New York Mets and San Francisco Giants.  Snider was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980.

Snider has occasionally taken acting roles since the mid-1950's, often appearing as himself or as a professional baseball player.   He played himself in "Hero Father" (1956) in the Robert Young television series "Father Knows Best" and as recently as 2007, he was featured in "Brooklyn Dodgers: The Ghosts of Flatbush."  Snider made one guest appearance on THE RIFLEMAN, playing Wallace in "The Retired Gun (episode 17).  Other credits include an uncredited part as a Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder in "The Geisha Boy" (1958), Phil Wallace in an episode of "The Retired Gun" (1959), the Cranker in "The Trouble with Girls" (1969) and a Steamer Fan in "Pastime" (1990).

Tom Snyder

Thomas "Tom" Snyder was an American news anchor, as well as radio and television personality who appeared in just three television shows during his 40-year career.  He graduated from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, having majored in journalism. In the 1960s, he was a local news anchor in Cleveland, Philadelphia, New York City and Los Angeles.  After segueing into late night television in the early 1970s, he continued to anchor the news.

Snyder came to national fame as a fixture in late night television, hosting the long-running "Tomorrow Show" (1973–1982), and later "The Late Late Show with Tom Snyder" (1995–1998).  Later, Dan Aykroyd would parody him and his laconic chain-smoking interview style and spontaneous bursts of laughter on "Saturday Night Live."  In between his late night stints, Snyder anchored the news in broadcast television and hosted a radio talk show, eventually yielding both media to a new generation of hosts (Rush Limbaugh in radio and David Letterman in broadcast).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pete in "A Friend in Need" (episode 123).

Vladimir Sokoloff

Vladimir Sokoloff, born Vladimir Nikolaevich Sokoloff, was a Russian film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  He became an actor and assistant director through the Moscow Art Theatre.  He emigrated to Berlin in 1923, then moved to Paris, eventually embarking for the United States in the wake of the Nazi's rising influence in Europe.  As a character actor, he portrayed characters of various nationalities.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his portrayal of Anselmo in the film adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's "For Whom the Bell Tolls" (1943), starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman; as well as his role as the Old Man in the western "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Eli Wallach, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and James Coburn.

Sokoloff had roles in several other memorable films, including the jailer Smith in the musical comedy "The Threepenny Opera" (1931), starring Rudolf Forster and Lotte Lanya; artist Paul Cezanne in the biographical drama "The Life of Emile Zola" (1937), starring Paul Muni, Gale Sondergaard, Joseph Schildkraut and Gloria Holden; Hyder Khan in "Road to Morocco" (1942), starring Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour; and George "Pop" Pilski in the noir film "While the City Sleeps" (1956), starring Dana Andrews, Rhonda Fleming and George Sanders.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960) and Rod Serling's "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), as well as the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961) and the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963).

Sokoloff made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Grandfather in "The Vaqueros" (episode 111).  He guest-starred in a few others westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Paul Sorenson

Paul Sorenson was an American stage, film and television actor, as well as an ordained minister.  He appeared in nearly 180 movies and televisions shows during a career spanning 35 years.  He graduated from the Pasadena Playhouse, which later honored him with a lifetime achievement award.  He served in the United States military during the Korean War.  Following a standout performance in a theater production of Garson Kanin's "Born Yesterday," Sorenson was signed by a talent agent.  He later co-founded the Orchard Gables Repertory Theater group and ran The Original Actors Workshop with the help of his wife.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his recurring role as Andy Bradley in the long-running drama "Dallas" (1978–1991).

Sorenson had roles in a few memorable films, including minor parts in the western "Hang 'Em High" (1968), starring Clint Eastwood; the sci-fi thriller "Westworld" (1973), starring Yul Brynner, Richard Benjamin and James Brolin; as well as Captain in the sci-fi film "Star Trek III: The Search for Spock" (1984), starring William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972) and the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977).

Sorenson made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a prisoner in "Seven" (episode 79) and Vic Adler in "The Sixteenth Cousin" (episode 159).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Olan Soule

Olan Soule, born Olan Evart Soule, was an American stage, radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 230 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 40 years.  He got his start performing on stage in Chicago, eventually making his way into radio, where he spent 11 years on the daytime drama "Bachelor's Children."  He was noted for his ability to provide voices that belied his modest outward appearance.

Soule had roles in several memorable films, including Johnson in the thriller "The Towering Inferno" (1974), starring Paul Newman, Steve McQueen, William Holden and Faye Dunaway; as well as minor parts in the sci-fi drama "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951), starring Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal; the comedy "Monkey Business" (1952), starring Cary Grant, Ginger Rogers, Marilyn Monroe and Charles Coburn; the Alfred Hitchcock thriller "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason; and the drama "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), starring Steve McQueen.

Soule provided the voice for Batman in the animated series "Super Friends" (1980–1983).  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).

Soule made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the hardware clerk in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Arthur Space

Arthur Space, born Charles Arthur Space, was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 260 movie and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He got his start in summer stock theater and eventually made the transition to Broadway.  He had roles in several memorable films, including Mr. Brown in the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "Tortilla Flat" (1942), starring Spencer Tracy, Hedy Lamarr, John Garfield and Frank Morgan; and Donald Hall in the biographical drama "The Spirit of St. Louis" (1957), starring James Stewart and Murray Hamilton; as well as minor parts in the noir film "The Woman in the Window" (1944), starring Edward G. Robsinson and Joan Bennett; and the drama "A Star Is Born" (1944), starring Judy Garland, James Mason and Jack Carson; however, he is probably best-remembered for his recurring television role as Doc Weaver in the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).

Space guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the crime drama "Ironside" (1967–1975) and the family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981).

Space made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the conductor in "The Grasshopper" (episode 63).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Douglas Spencer

Douglas Spencer, born William Henry Mesenkep, was an American actor who worked primarily in film.  He appeared in nearly 90 movies and television shows during his two-decade career.  He had roles in many memorable films, including Bert Finch in the thriller "The Big Clock" (1948), starring Ray Milland, Maureen O'Sullivan and Charles Laughton; Ned "Scotty" Scott in the sci-fi horror "The Thing from Another World" (1951), starring James Arness; and Axel "Swede" Shipstead in the western "Shane" (1953), starring Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur and Van Heflin; as well as minor parts in the noir film "Double Indemnity" (1944), starring Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson and Byron Barr; the Billy Wilder drama "The Lost Weekend" (1945), starring Ray Milland and Jane Wyman; the romantic comedy "Father of the Bride" (1950), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor; and the romantic drama "A Place in the Sun" (1951), starring Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor and Shelley Winters.

He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jackson in "The Dead-Eyed Kid" (episode 20). Spencer guest-starred in Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and several TV westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Ted Stanhope

Ted Stanhope was an American film and television actor who appeared in more than 130 movies and television shows during his 35-year career.  He had minor parts in many memorable films, including the dramatic comedy "State of the Union" (1948), starring Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Van Johnson and Angela Lansbury; the western drama "High Noon" (1952), starring Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly and Lloyd Bridges; the noir film "The Big Heat" (1953), starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame; the crime thriller "Suddenly" (1954), starring Frank Sinatra and Sterling Hayden; and the film adaptation of Jacqueline Susann's "Valley of the Dolls" (1967), starring Barbara Perkins, Patty Duke and Sharon Tate.

Stanhope guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), Rod Serling's anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).  Stanhope made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the grave digger in "Tension" (episode 45).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Harry Dean Stanton

Harry Dean Stanton is a prolific American character actor of stage, film and television, as well as a musician.  He has appeared in more than 180 movies and television shows during an illustrious career spanning more than six decades.  He studied journalism and radio arts in Lexington at the University of Kentucky.  Later he relocated to California and studied acting at the Pasadena Playhouse.  He also served in the Navy during World War II.  Stanton has been a very successful character actor, distinguished by his drooping, weather-beaten appearance.  He has garnered accolades from critics, notably Roger Ebert, who observed, "no movie featuring Harry Dean Stanton… in a supporting role can be altogether bad."

Stanton has had numerous film roles, including an uncredited role in the adventure drama "How the West Was Won" (1962), starring James Stewart, John Wayne and Gregory Peck; Tramp in the crime drama "Cool Hand Luke" (1967), starring Paul Newman; Pvt. Willard in the action comedy "Kelly's Heroes" (1970), starring Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O'Connor and Donald Sutherland; Homer Van Meter in the biographical gangster film "Dillinger" (1973), starring Warren Oates; an F.B.I. agent in the Francis Ford Coppola classic "The Godfather: Part II" (1974), starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro and Robert Duvall; Brett in the horror sci-fi film "Alien" (1979), starring Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skeritt and John Hurt; Detective Rudolph Junkins in the film adaptation of Stephen King's "Christine" (1983); Jack Walsh in the dramatic comedy "Pretty in Pink" (1986), co-starring Molly Ringwald and John Cryer; Saul/Paul in the drama "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988), starring Willem Dafoe, Harvey Keitel and Barbara Hershey; the judge in the film adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson's "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" (1998), starring Johnny Depp and Benicio Del Toro; and the voice of Balthazar in the animated comedy "Rango" (2011), starring Johnny Depp.

Stanton has guest-starred in many television shows from the 1950s through the present day, including the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975) and the comedy "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970).  More recently, Stanton had a recurring role as Roman Grant in the HBO drama "Big Love" (2006–2011).

Stanton made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Clemmie in "Tension" (episode 45).  He has guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970).

Michael Stefani

Michael Stefani appeared in just eight movies and television shows during a 30-year career.  He portrayed Martin Whistler in the sci-fi action film "Trancers" (1985), starring Tim Thomerson, Helen Hunt and Art LaFleur.  His other credits have been in television, including the medical drama "The Eleventh Hour" (!962–1964), the marine corps drama "The Lieutenant" (1964–1966), the marital drama "The Young Marrieds" (1964–1966), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973).  Stefani made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Chad Morgan in "Nora" (episode 75).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Two Faces West" (1960), starring Charles Bateman, Joyce Meadows and Francis De Sales, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

K. T. Stevens

K. T. Stevens was an American actress whose career in films and television spanned 70 years.  She debuted in her first film role at age two in a silent film classic directed by her father, Sam Wood, in "Peck's Bad Boy" (1921), which starred Jackie Coogan.  Stevens also worked on the stage and in radio, eventually retiring from acting, but later returning to the screen as a character actress, primarily in television.  She appeared five episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Muriel Chase in "Heller" (episode 62), Molly Fenway in "The Fourflusher" (episode 72), Nancy Clay in "Face of Yesterday" (episode 95), Emma Lincoln in "Honest Abe" (episode 118), and Granny Mede in "End of the Hunt" (episode 162).

Rusty Stevens

Robert "Rusty" Stevens is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  A former child actor, he has appeared in 14 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years.  Although primarily a television actor, he had an uncredited role as Sonny Pollitt in the Tennessee Williams classic film adaptation of "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman and Burl Ives.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime dramas "Racket Squad" (1950) and "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972); however, he is most recognizable for his role as Larry Mondello in the iconic family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), a role that he reprised in the TV movie "Still the Beaver" (1983), as well as the series reboot "The New Leave It to Beaver" (1983–1989).  Stevens made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Melvin in "Hostage to Fortune" (episode 160).  He also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Bert Stevens

Bert Stevens, born Malcolm Byron Stevens and older brother of Barbara Stanwyck, was a prolific American actor who worked primarily in film.  He appeared in more than 270 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  Despite his extensive filmography, virtually all of his roles were uncredited.  Among his roles in notable films were the romantic comedy "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936), starring Gary Cooper and Jean Arthur; the Orson Welles' classic "Citizen Kane" (1941), starring Orson Welles; the crime comedy "Monsieur Verdoux" (1947), starring Charlie Chaplin; the biographical drama "Houdini" (1953), starring Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh; the George Stevens drama based on the Edna Ferber novel of the same name, "Giant" (1956), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean; the crime drama "Witness for the Prosecution" (1957), starring Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich and Charles Laughton; the Alfred Hitchcock mystery adventure "North by Northwest" (1959), starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint; the Billy Wilder comedy "Some Like It Hot" (1959), starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon; the historical drama "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961), starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster and Richard Widmark; the political thriller "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962), starring Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, Angela Lansbury and Janet Leigh; and the musical drama "The Sound of Music" (1965), starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer.

Stevens guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Stevens made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the doctor in "The Marshal" (episode 4).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Jan Stine

Jan Stine, born Jan Russell Stine, was an American actor who primarily worked in television.  He appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows during his brief career.  He guest-starred in several popular shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the comedy "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963), the family comedy "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  Stine made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Johnny in "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78) and Gorwin Morgan in "The High Country" (episode 122).  He guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Hank Stohl

Hank Stohl, born Henry S. Zakowski, was an American film and television actor, as well as a television personality.  He appeared in nearly 30 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 40 years.  He hosted a children's show on a local Pittsburgh television station, in addition to a variety show in which he interviewed celebrities such as Sammy Davis Jr., Jerry Lewis and THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors.  Following the interview with Connors, THE RIFLEMAN star invited Stohl to appear in the popular western.  After making his guest appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, Stohl went on to appear in many other television shows and even films; however, his main professional credits were for providing narration for commercials.

Stohl had roles in a few memorable films, including General Enders in the thriller "Capricorn One" (1977), starring Elliot Gould, James Brolin, Brenda Vaccaro and Sam Waterson; and the morgue cop in the horror film "Diabolique" (1996), starring Sharon Stone, Isabelle Adjani, Chazz Palminteri and Kathy Bates.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the crime drama "Ironside" (1967–1975), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977), the comedy "Happy Days" (1974–1984), the police series "Starsky and Hutch" (1975–1979) and the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983).  Stohl made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a cowboy in "Ordeal" (episode 48) and Britt in "Death Trap" (episode 109).

Harold J. Stone

Harold J. Stone was an American film and television character actor.  Born Harold Hochstein to a Jewish acting family, he began his career on Broadway in 1939.  He made his motion picture debut in the Alan Ladd film, "The Blue Dahlia" (1946). He went to work in small but memorable roles in films that included "The Harder They Fall" (1956) with Humphrey Bogart, Alfred Hitchcock's "The Wrong Man" (1956), "Somebody Up There Likes Me" (1956), "Spartacus" (1960), "Girl Happy" (1965) and the gangster epic, "The St. Valentine's Day Massacre" (1967), in which he played Chicago mobster Frank Nitti.

Stone became a recognizable face to television viewers, appearing in many police dramas, including "77 Sunset Strip" (1958), "Naked City" (1958), "The Untouchables" (1959), "Mannix" (1967), "Mission: Impossible" (1966), "The Rockford Files" (1974) and "Kojak" (1973). and having made more than 150 guest appearances on numerous television shows that included "I Spy" (1967), "The Barbara Stanwyck Show" (1961), "Griff" (1973), "The Untouchables" (1960–1963), "The Twilight Zone" (1961), "Hogan's Heroes" (1968–1971), and "Get Smart" (1966).  He had a recurring role in the short-lived series "Bridget Loves Bernie" (1972–1973), starring Meredith Baxter and David Birney.  Stone also appeared in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Oat Jackford in "Home Ranch" (episode 2), Ben Stark in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77) and the Marshal in "The Bullet" (163).

In the 1960s and 70s, while still working in television, Stone returned to the stage, directing several off-Broadway and off-off-Broadway productions, including "Ernest in Love" and "Charley's Aunt."

Leonard Stone

Leonard Stone, born Leonard Steinbock, was an American character actor of stage, film and television.  He appeared in more than 130 movies and television shows during his 50-year career.  After serving in the Navy during World War II, Stone attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London.  He then relocated to Australia where he participated in the traveling production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical "South Pacific."  Upon returning to the United States, he guest-starred in a wide variety of shows from the 1950s through the 90s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the comedy "The Real McCoys" (1957–1963), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the family comedy "The Donna Reed Show" (1958–1966), the war comedies "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C." (1964–1969) and "M*A*S*H" (1972–1983), the police dramas "Mod Squad" (1968–1973) and "Adam-12" (1968–1975), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the sitcoms "The Dukes of Hazzard" (1979–1985) and "Barney Miller" (1974–1982), and the medical crime drama "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).

Stone had several recurring roles, including Doc Joslyn in the comedy series "Camp Runamuck" (1965), Lenny in the comedy "Alice" (1976–1985), Judge Carl Fuller in the primetime drama "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990), and Judge Paul Hanson in the legal drama "L.A. Law" (1986–1994); however, he is best-remembered for his portrayal of Mr. Beauregarde in the film adaptation of the Roald Dahl children's fantasy "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" (1971), starring Gene Wilder.  In addition to his most famous role, Stone played the role of Charles in the sci-fi drama "Soylent Green" (1973), starring Charlton Heston and Leigh Taylor-Young.  Stone made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the gambler in "Miss Bertie" (episode 90) and KC in "Deadly Image" (episode 132).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Glenn Strange

Glenn Strange was an American actor most well known for playing roles in the Western and Horror genres.  Growing up in New Mexico, he had been a rancher, cowboy and rodeo performer—a background that lent authenticity to the Western characters he played.  In the 1920's he learned to play the fiddle and guitar, and toured the country with a radio singing group, the Arizona Wranglers.  He came to Hollywood in 1930 with the ensemble and began landing small parts in "B" Westerns.  At 6' 5" tall, he had a large, rugged frame and heavy features—attributes that tended to typecast him as villainous and nefarious characters.  Later, a different Western characterization would supplant the archetypal villains he portrayed earlier in his career—Sam Noonan, the bartender on CBS's "Gunsmoke" (1961–1973) television series would become his most enduring TV personae.  He appeared in 215 episodes of "Gunsmoke."

Boris Karloff, the quintessential Horror genre star, portrayed Frankenstein's monster in three films, but in 1944 passed the baton to Strange, who played the monster role in three Universal films, "House of Frankenstein" (1944), "House of Dracula" (1945) and the camp horror-comedy film, "Bud Abbott and Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein" (1948).  Ironically, in "House of Frankenstein" Karloff was cast as the villainous Dr. Niemann opposite Strange as the monster, formerly Karloff's signature character.

Beginning in the late 1940's, Strange segued into television and for the rest of his career appeared in numerous shows, again, frequently appearing in Westerns.   He guest-starred in six episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing variations of the same character in each outing.  He was Cole, the stagecoach driver, in "Duel of Honor" (episode 7) and a shotgun guard on the stagecoach in "The Dead-eye Kid" (episode 20), then Joey, the stagecoach driver, in "The Woman" (episode 32), followed by appearances as an unnamed stagecoach driver in "The Blowout" (episode 43), "The Spiked Rifle" (episode 49) and "Miss Bertie" (episode 90).  Among the many television shows in which he appeared, Strange guest-starred in "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "Death Valley Days" (1954 1958), "The Adventures of Champion" (1955–1956), "The Cisco Kid" (1955–1956) and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955 1960).  He passed away in 1973, ending his career playing Sam Noonan, the bartender on "Gunsmoke," whom he played for 12 years.

Frank Sully

Frank Sully was an American character actor of television and film.  He appeared in more than 270 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He was typecast as the heavy and is perhaps best-remembered for his portrayal of Danny in "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Sully had roles in several memorable films, including Noah Joad in the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath" (1940), starring Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell and John Carradine; and Maude's bartender in the musical comedy "Bye Bye Birdie" (1963), starring Dick Van Dyke, Ann-Margret, Janet Leigh and Maureen Stapleton; as well as minor parts in the crime drama "Fury" (1936), starring Sylvia Sidney, Spencer Tracy, Walter Abel and Bruce Cabot; the romantic comedy "Father's Little Dividend" (1951), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor; and the biographical drama "Funny Girl" (1968), starring Barbra Streisand, Omar Sharif and Anne Francis.

Sully guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).

Sully made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the second spieler in "The Wrong Man" (episode 27).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner.

Hope Summers

Hope Summers was an American actress of the stage, radio, film and television.  Her acting career began in the 1930's, when she worked primarily in community and stock theater and radio.  Her career was most active in the 1950's and 1960's, when she appeared in numerous films and television shows.   Her film credits include "Zero Hour!" (1957), "Inherit the Wind" (1960), "Spencer's Mountain" (1963), "The Hallelujah Trail" (1965), "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1966), "The Shakiest Gun in the West" (1968), "Rosemary's Baby" (1968), "Charley Varrick" (1973) and her last movie, "Foul Play" (1978).

Summers began working in television in the 1950's, guest-starring in a wide variety of genres, but especially Westerns.  Her television credits include "The Loretta Young Show" (1956–1959), "Maverick" (1957) and "Wagon Train" (1957), "Gunsmoke" (1958–1963), "Dennis the Menace" (1959), "Petticoat Junction" (1963) and "The Phyllis Diller Show" (1966).  She played numerous memorable recurring roles in many hit television series, including "Hawkins Falls: A Television Novel" (1950).  Her best-known role was Clara Edwards, Aunt Bee's gossipy neighbor, in "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960-1968) and its spin-off, "Mayberry R.F.D." (1968–1971).  Summers appeared in 16 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN as Hattie Denton, owner of the General Store.  Hattie was first introduced in "Eight Hours to Die" (episode 6).  Her last regular television role was playing Olive in "Another Day" (1978).

Bob Sweeney

Bob Sweeney was an American film and television actor who also had a prolific career as a producer and director.  He appeared in more than 30 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He graduated from San Francisco State College, then began working in radio as an announcer and comedian.  He is known for having lent his voice to the "Sweeney and March Show" (1944–1948), in which he co-starred with Hal March on CBS radio.

Sweeney produced or directed many popular television shows of the 1960s, 70s and early 80s, primarily comedies, including "The Patty Duke Show" (1963–1966), the first three seasons of the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the war comedy "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971), "The Doris Show" (1968–1972), the Marlo Thomas comedy "That Girl" (1966–1971) and several Aaron Spelling series, including "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), "The Love Boat" (1977–1986) and "Dynasty" (1981–1989).  He also worked on several hit dramatic series, including the medical drama "Trapper John M.D." (1979–1986) and the crime drama "Hawaii 5–0" (1968–1980).

Sweeney had a few roles in memorable films, including Johnny Degnan in the drama "The Last Hurrah" (1958), starring Spencer Tracy and Pat O'Brien; Cousin Bob in the Alfred Hitchcock mystery drama "Marnie" (1964), starring Tippi Hedren, Sean Connery, Diane Baker and Martin Gabel; and a minor part in the drama "A Raisin in the Sun" (1961), starring Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee.  He made multiple appearances in "The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" (1950–1958), and also guest-starred in the family comedy "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966) and the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), among many other shows.  He also had recurring roles playing Oliver Munsey in the family comedy "Our Miss Brooks" (1952–1956) and Gilly Box in the sitcom "Brothers" (1984–1989).  He also played the lead in his own comedy shows, "The Brothers" (1956–1957), co-starring Gale Gordon and Barbara Billingsly, and the title role in "Fibber McGee and Molly" (1959–1960), co-starring Cathy Lewis and Paul Smith.  Sweeney made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Speed Sullivan in "The Pitchman" (episode 80) and "Assault" (episode 102).

Karl Swenson

Karl Swenson was an American actor of theater, radio, film and television whose career spanned more than 35 years.  He met his second wife, stage and radio actress Joan Tompkins, while working in radio, and they performed together in various media, including film and television, throughout their careers.  Swenson's long career began on the stage and in radio, appearing in numerous serials, including "Inner Sanctum Mysteries" (1941–1952), and the title roles in "Lorenzo Jones" (1937–1949) and the detective serials, "The Adventures of Father Brown" (1945) and "Mr. Chameleon" (1948–1953).

Beginning in the 1950's, Swenson guest-starred in 160 films and television shows.  A fair-haired, strapping man of Swedish ancestry, Swenson was frequently typecast in roles playing Scandinavian characters.  Usually appearing in minor parts, his film credits include "Kings Go Forth" (1958), "North to Alaska" (1960), Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" (1963) and "The Sons of Katie Elder" (1965).  He had a prolific career in television, frequently appearing in Westerns; his many TV credits include "Gunsmoke" (1957–1971), "The Texan" (1958–1959), "Zane Grey Theater" (1958–1959), "Bachelor Father" (1958–1960), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1963), "Bonanza" (1959–1967), "Perry Mason" (1962–1965), "The Virginian" (1962–1969), "Lassie" (1962–1972), "Dr. Kildaire" (1965), "The Big Valley" (1965–1967) and "The Mod Squad" (1970–1972).

Swenson appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing the recurring character of Nils Svenson (variously Swenson, Swensen), the Blacksmith in "The Vision" (episode 66) and Chris Mance in "The Jailbird" (episode 73).  Swenson is probably best remembered for his role playing lumber mill owner Lars Hanson in "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1978).  He had met actor/writer/producer/director Michael Landon on the set of "Bonanza" (1959), and remembering him when casting his successful "Little House" franchise, Landon gave Swenson a recurring role, which the veteran actor played until his death in 1978.

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Sarah Taft

Sarah Taft was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows in a 20-year career.  She had roles in several memorable films, including the part of Sarah in the dramatic comedy "The Reivers" (1969), starring Steve McQueen and Sharon Farrell; as well as minor parts in the Alfred Hitchcock thriller "Vertigo" (1958), starring James Stewart and Kim Novak; the romantic comedy "Donovan's Reef" (1963), starring John Wayne; and the thriller "The Mechanic" (1972), starring Charles Bronson, Jan-Michael Vincent and Keenan Wynn.

Taft guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the period crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), and the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).  Taft made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the old woman in "Waste" (episode 74) and Sara Caruthers in "Dead Cold Cash" (episode 85).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Akim Tamiroff

Tamiroff was a Russian actor of Armenian descent.   Born in Tblisi, Georgia, he was trained in Moscow Art Theatre drama school and arrived in the U.S. in 1923 on a tour with a troupe of actors.  He decided to stay and managed to develop a career in Hollywood where his thick Russian accent and versatility as a character actor brought him many different roles.  In a film and television career spanning more than 40 years, his film role playing The Boss in the politically satirical comedy "The Great McGinty" inspired the cartoon villain Boris Badenov on "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show."

Tamiroff's film debut came in 1932 in an uncredited role in "Okay, America!"  He performed in several uncredited roles until 1935, when he co-starred in "The Lives of a Bengal Lancer." The following year, he was cast in the title role in "The General Died at Dawn," for which he received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.  He appeared in the 1937 musical "High, Wide and Handsome" and the 1938 proto-noir "Dangerous to Know" opposite Anna May Wong—a film frequently cited as his best role.

In the following decade, he appeared in numerous films, including "The Buccaneer," "The Great McGinty," "The Corsican Brothers," "Tortilla Flat" "Five Graves to Cairo," "His Butler's Sister," "The Miracle of Morgan's Creek" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls," for which he received another Oscar nomination and won the 1944 Golden Globe award for Best Supporting Actor.  In later years, Tamiroff appeared in "Touch of Evil," the original screen version of "Ocean's Eleven" and "Topkapi."  Tamiroff appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the villain, Tiffauges, in "New Orleans Menace" (episode 10).

Charles Tannen

Charles Tannen, born Charles David Tannen, was an American television and film actor who appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He had uncredited roles in numerous films, including the romantic drama "The Dark Angel" (1935), starring Fredric March and Merle Oberon; the biographical drama "Young Mr. Lincoln" (1939), starring Henry Fonda; the crime drama "The Street with No Name" (1948), starring Mark Stevens and Richard Widmark; the landmark sci-fi drama "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951), starring Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal; and the sci-fi horror film "The Fly" (1958), starring David Hedison and Vincent Price.  Although his uncredited roles outnumber the credited ones, Tannen was cast in significant parts in several Henry Fonda films, including Charles Ford in the westerns "Jesse James" (1939) and "The Return of Frank James" (1940), and Joe in the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940).

Tannen guest-starred in many television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the comedy "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970).  Tannen made six guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Barney the barber in "The Boarding House" (episode 22), the bartender in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), Josh Moore in "The Jailbird" (episode 73) and "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78), Mr. Penn in "Miss Milly" (episode 84), and Jack Carson in "The Actress" (episode 94).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).

Kent Taylor

Kent Taylor, born Louis William Weiss, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 140 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly four decades.  Most of his film appearances were in obscure B-movies; although, he did have a minor part in the historical drama "The Scarlet Express" (1934), starring Marlene Dietrich.  He is best-remembered for his recurring role as the title character of the crime drama "Boston Blackie" (1951–1953).

Taylor guest-starred in a few popular television shows, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), in which he played the recurring character Carlos Murietta.  He also appeared in the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961) and the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Forbes McKee in parts one and two of "The Wyoming Story" (episodes 96 and 97).  Previously, he starred in his own western series "The Rough Riders" (1958–1959), playing ex-Confederate officer Captain Jim Flagg.  He also guest-starred in a few other westerns, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "Bronco" (1958–1962), starring Ty Hardin.  His appearance in "Land of The Giants" (1968–1970) was one of his last television roles.

Joan Taylor

Joan Taylor was an American actress born to a family in the entertainment business.  Her mother, Amelia Berky, was a vaudeville dancer and singer in the 1920s.  Her father operated a movie theater, which inspired in her an abiding interest in the movies from an early age.  Taylor came to Hollywood in 1946 and worked on the stage at the Pasadena Playhouse for four years.  Discovered by Victor Jory when she played Regina in "Another Part of the Forest," she was contracted to Paramount Studios where she appeared in several Western pictures.  She guest-starred in numerous television series in the 1950s and early 60s, retiring from acting in 1962.

Taylor appeared in 18 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN between 1960 and 1962, playing Milly Scott, Owner of the General Store, which she bought from Hattie Denton.  An attractive young woman who figured as a love interest for Lucas McCain, her character was introduced in "Miss Milly" (episode 84).

Ray Teal

Ray Teal was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 330 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 40 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, Teal attended the University of California, Los Angeles.  He had a few credited roles in memorable films, including Mr. Mollett in the romantic drama "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946), starring Fredric March, Dana Andrews, Myrna Loy and Teresa Wright; Sheriff Gus Kretzer in the drama "Ace in the Hole" (1951), starring Kirk Douglas and Jan Sterling; Frank Bleaker in "The Wild One" (1953), starring Marlon Brando; and Judge Curtiss Ives in the historical drama "Judgment at Nuremberg" (1961), starring Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster and Richard Widmark.  He is perhaps best-remembered, however, for his recurring role as Sheriff Roy Coffee in the long-running western series "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Teal played minor parts in many films, including the romantic adventure "They Met in Bombay" (1941), starring Clark Gable, Rosalind Russell and Peter Lorre; the romantic drama "The Clock" (1945), starring Judy Garland, Robert Walker and Keenan Wynn; the prison drama "Brute Force" (1947), starring Burt Lancaster and Hume Cronyn; the crime drama "Asphalt Jungle" (1950), starring Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern and James Whitmore; and the western "Winchester '73" (1950), starring James Stewart and Shelley Winters.

Teal guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the family comedy "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the courtroom drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974).  Teal made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Albie in "Eddie's Daughter" (episode 46).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Pick Temple

Pick Temple was an American cowboy folksinger.  Various accounts report that in the 1930s he rode the rails and listened to the melancholy ballads inspired by the hard scrabble lives of the people he met during the Great Depression, which he later recorded for the Library of Congress music archives; however, during this period through the early 1950s, he had a long-term regular job as an economic statistician at the U.S. Census Bureau.  After a stint in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he returned to the Baltimore area where he grew up and wrote, produced, and performed a series of programs on folk music for Washington D.C. station WTTG.  He went on to host a long-running children's show "The Pick Temple Giant Ranch" (1948–1961), which was produced for various stations from Baltimore, Washington, D.C. to Philadelphia.  After the show was cancelled, he returned to his earlier civil service career.  Temple made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the guitarist in "Honest Abe" (episode 118); he sang the tune "Blue-tailed Fly."

Dee J. Thompson

Dee J. Thompson appeared in 35 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  She portrayed Donna in the romantic comedy "The Glass Bottom Boat" (1966), starring Doris Day, Rod Taylor and Arthur Godfrey.  She guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the crime drama "Dragnet" (1951–1959), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the comedy "Hazel" (1961–1966), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962) and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972).  She had a recurring role playing Agnes in the Imogene Coca comedy "Grindl" (1963–1964).  Thompson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ma Boyle in "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

Larry Thor

Larry Thor, born Arnleifur Lawrence Thorsteinson, was a Canadian actor who worked primarily in radio and television.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  While working for CBS radio, Thor served as an announcer in "The Adventures of Rock Jordan" (1948–1953) and "The Green Lama" (1949), in addition to portraying detective Danny Clover in "Broadway Is My Beat" (1949–1954).

Thor guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the family comedies "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963) and "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the sitcom "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1965), the espionage thrillers "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "I Spy" (1965–1968) and the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jessie Phillips in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

Kelly Thordsen

Kelly Thordsen, born Sherman Jess Thordsen, was an American television and film actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career of just two decades.  Character actor William Bendix appeared at an LAPD benefit where Thordsen, a motorcycle police officer, was master of ceremonies.  After the performance, Bendix complimented Thordsen and suggested he embark on an acting career.  Playing to type, Thordsen was frequently cast as lawmen.   He had roles in several notable films, including Sheriff Clark in the drama "Sweet Bird of Youth" (1962), starring Paul Newman and Geraldine Page; an uncredited role in the film adaptation of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962), starring Gregory Peck; Federal Purchasing Agent Carroll in the war drama "Shenandoah" (1965), starring James Stewart; and Sheriff L.D. Wicker in the thriller "The Parallax View" (1974), starring Warren Beatty.

Thordsen guest-starred in many television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), "Adam-12" (1968–1975) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the long-running family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1974) and Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), and the western adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).  He had a recurring role as Colorado Charlie in the western "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959), starring Jock Mahoney, X Brands and Kevin Hagen.

Thordsen made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Arthur M. Truelove in "Closer than a Brother" (episode 98) and Andy in "The Score is Even" (episode 105).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), and "The Virginian" (1962–1971).

Russell Thorson

Russell Thorson, born Delos Russell Thorson, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 120 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 30 years.  He portrayed Maddow in the western "Hang 'Em High" (1968), starring Clint Eastwood, and had a minor part in the war drama "Run Silent Run Deep" (1958), starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster.

Thorson guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960) and "Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), where THE RIFLEMAN made its debut.  Among the many other shows in which he appeared were the medical dramas "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966) and "Marcus Welby M.D." (1969–1976), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the sitcom "Gilligan's Island" (1964–1965), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the law enforcement drama "The F.B.I." (1965–1974), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977) and the detective dramas "Cannon" (1971–1976) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  He also played recurring roles portraying William Kennerly in the primetime television drama "Peyton Place" (1964–1969), Det. Lt. Otto Lindstrom in "The Detectives" (1959–1962), and Dr. Donald White in the daytime drama "Days of Our Lives" (1965– ).

Thorson made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Marshal Burks in parts one and two of "The Wyoming Story" (episodes 96 and 97).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Mary Jo Tierney

Mary Jo Tierney made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Holly in "The Shattered Idol" (episode 120).

Les Tremayne

Les Tremayne was a British-born radio, film and television actor whose career spanned nearly 70 years.  He immigrated to the United States as a small child and grew up in Chicago.  He began his career working in community theater, dancing in vaudeville shows and playing the role of barker at amusement parks.  Tremayne landed his first radio job in 1930 and went on to appear in numerous serials and shows.  In 1936, he became famous after replacing actor Don Ameche as the leading man on "The First Nighter," a weekly program of radio dramas.  The repertoire of voices and accents he cultivated working in radio garnered him many voice assignments throughout his career and eventually, in 1995, induction into the Radio Hall of Fame. It has been estimated that Lee worked on more than 30,000 broadcasts, performing in as many as 45 radio shows every week in the 1930's and '40's.

In 1943, Tremayne left the Chicago area and moved to Los Angeles and later to New York.  Before serving in the military, he starred with Bob Crosby on the "Old Gold Show" (beginning 1943).  In New York, he starred in the popular "Thin Man" and "Falcon" mystery thrillers and later co-starred with second wife, Alice Reinhardt in "The Tremaynes," a breakfast talk show.  In 1947, he appeared on stage in "Heads or Tails" and for 18 months performed on Broadway in "Detective Story," beginning in 1949.

In the 1950's, he was a durable player in film and TV dramas.  His filmography includes "The Racket" (1951), the sci-fi classic "War of the Worlds" (1953), "A Man Called Peter" (1955) and "North by Northwest" (1959).  Typically cast in roles playing shifty executives, errant husbands and unctuous, non-nonsense professionals in scores of TV dramas, he appeared in numerous shows, including "Perry Mason," "Alfred Hitchcock Presents," and "77 Sunset Strip."  Tremayne appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Professor in "The Challenge" (episode 28).  Tremayne went on to play one of the longest-lived and oldest characters in daytime television, Edward L. Quartermaine, the scion of the wealthy Port Charles family in ABC's "General Hospital."

Karen Sue Trent

Karen Sue Trent is an American actress who has worked primarily in television.  She has appeared in just six movies and television shows in a 10-year period.  In addition to television shows, Trent appeared in several commercials.  She guest-starred in the family fantasy series "The Shirley Temple Theatre" (1958–1961), and the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN's last episode, portraying Lorrie in "Old Tony" (episode 168).  She also guest-starred in the western "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond.

Gene Tyburn

Gene Tyburn is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in 45 movies and television shows during a 20-year career.  He guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, including the war comedy "McHale's Navy" (1962–1966), starring Ernest Borgnine, Joe Flynn and Tim Conway; the fantasy anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), starring Robert Wagner; the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), starring Robert Conrad and Ross Martin; the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray and Don Grady; the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), starring an ensemble cast led by Peter Graves, Barbara Bain and Martin Landau; the legal drama "Ironside" (1967–1975), starring Raymond Burr, and the primetime soap operas "Dallas" (1978–1991) and "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990), both starring ensemble casts led by Larry Hagman and Jane Wyman, respectively.  Tyburn made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Deputy Ben in "The Bullet" (episode 163).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

David Tyrell

David Tyrell was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in six movies and television shows during a 30-year period.  He began acting on Broadway.  He had minor parts in a few memorable films, including the film adaptation of "All Quiet on the Western Front" (1930), starring Lew Ayres; the comedy "Love Before Breakfast" (1936), starring Carole Lombard; and the musical comedy "It Happened at the World's Fair" (1963), starring Elvis Presley.  He had a recurring role as Charlie Burr in the comedy "Mister Peepers" (1952–1955).  Tyrell made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Roy Thursby in "The Sister" (episode 9).

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Natividad Vacio

Natividad Vacio, born Jose Natividad Dominguez Vacio, was an American character actor of film and television, in addition to being a musician and a teacher.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  Due to his Hispanic heritage, Vacio almost always was cast in ethnic roles.  During high school, he became friends with George Reeves, who encouraged him to enroll at the Pasadena Community Playhouse.  Following military service in World War II, he began working as a teacher and appearing in films and television.  In addition to acting, Vacio was a guitarist and singer, making recordings with composer Laurindo Almeida.  He was also the director of the Commedia del Artistes stage company in Padua Hills, California.

Vacio made appearances in many classic films, including the role of Jose in the film noir thriller "The Hitch-Hiker" (1953), starring Frank Lovejoy, Edmund O'Brien and William Talman; an uncredited role in the film adaptation of the Edna Ferber classic "Giant" (1956), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean; Miguel in "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner, Eli Wallack and Steve McQueen; and Ramon in the Steve Martin comedy "The Man with Two Brains" (1983).  He guest-starred in a wide variety of popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring his best friend George Reeves, the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the action adventures "I Spy" (1965–1968), "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970) and "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the action undercover police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the crime drama "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980), and the family comedies "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), "My Three Sons" (1960–1972) and "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970), and the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970).

Vacio played several recurring roles, including Fronk in the the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960) and Senor Leal in the drama "Knots Landing" (1979–1993).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pedro in "The Vision" (episode 66).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors, "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), starring Lee Aaker and James Brown, "The Texan" (1958–1960), starring Rory Calhoun, "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), starring Walter Brennan and Dack Rambo, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Lee Van Cleef

Lee Van Cleef was an American actor born in Somerville, New Jersey.  He was one of the great movie villains, whose distinctive hawk nose, steely glint in his eyes and perpetual snarl in the turn of his mouth destined him to play the heavy in some of the most memorable Westerns and action pictures of the 1950's and 60's.  Van Cleef appeared in 90 films and over 100 television series spanning nearly four decades.  Before breaking into films, during World War II, Van Cleef served in the United States Navy aboard minesweepers and subchasers.  Later, he had a brief career as an accountant and became involved in amateur theatrics in his spare time.  An audition for a professional role led to a touring company job in "Mr. Roberts."  His performance was seen by Stanley Kramer, who cast him as henchman Jack Colby in "High Noon" (1952), a role that brought him great recognition, despite having no dialogue in the film.  Over the next decade, he played a string of memorably villainous characters, primarily in Westerns but also in crime dramas such as "I Cover the Underworld" and "The Big Combo," both released in 1955.  He played another outlaw henchman in John Ford's "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (1962).  In 1965, Sergio Leone cast him as the tough but decent Colonel Mortimer opposite Clint Eastwood in the Spaghetti Western, "For a Few Dollars More."  The following year, he portrayed the character Sentena/Angel Eyes in Leone's "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly" (1966).  The roles revitalized his flagging career, but now as a western hero, or at least an anti-hero, and he became an international star.  His later films, however, were of lesser quality.  In the 1980's he moved into action and martial-arts movies.

Lee Van Cleef appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dan Maury in "The Deadly Wait" (episode 26), Stinger in "The Prodigal" (episode 71), Wicks in "The Clarence Bibs Story" (episode 104), Johnny Drago in "Death Never Rides Alone" (episode 147).  He also co-starred with Chuck Connors in "Trial by Fear," an episode of "The DuPont Show with June Allyson" (1960), and in two episodes of Chuck Connors' later series, "Branded" (1965-1966).  Of his career, Van Cleef once quipped, " Being born with a pair of beady eyes was the best thing that ever happened to me."

Arlyne Varden

Arlyne Varden appeared in just three movies and television shows during a 20-year period.  She had minor parts in the musical comedy "Louisiana Purchase" (1941), starring Bob Hope and Vera Zorina, and the musical drama "Lady in the Dark" (1944), starring Ginger Rogers, Ray Milland and Warner Baxter.  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the waitress Angie in "The Decision" (episode 116).

Robert Vaughn

Robert Francis Vaughn was an American actor born in New York to show-business parents: his father Walter was a radio actor and his mother, Marcella, was a stage actress.  He had a prolific career in film and television spanning more than 55 years.  Vaughn came to public attention with his Oscar-nominated role in "The Young Philadelphians," in 1959.  The following year he was one of the seven in the Western classic, "The Magnificent Seven."  Despite the popularity of the films in which he appeared, Vaughn found steady work on television and had more than 200 guest roles in the late 1950's through early 1960's. It was during this period that he appeared in one episode of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Don Willard in the title role of "The Apprentice Sheriff" (episode 11).

Vaughn's first major television role was in the 1963 Gene Roddenbury series, "The Lieutenant."  He took the part intending to segue from being a guest star into a co-star on TV, which apparently worked, because after seeing him, producer Norman Felton offered him the role of Napoleon Solo in "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968).  His portrayal of the ultra-cool spy is his best-remembered role—one that established his enduring signature suave personae.

The successful spy series made Vaughn an international TV star, but he wanted to return to film, which he did in 1968, in "Bullitt," starring Steve McQueen.  His portrayal as an ambitious California politician earned him a BAFTA Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.  He began working in film full-time, starring in "The Bridge of Remagen" (1969) and "The Mind of Mr. Soams" (1970).  In the 1970's, he went to England, taking the lead role in the television series, "The Protectors" (1972–1973), but by the mid-70's, he returned to the US and embarked on a very successful run of TV mini-series roles which garnered him an Emmy award in 1978 for "Washington: Behind Closed Doors" and a nomination the following year for "Backstairs at the White House."

Vaughn continued to work on television, film and stage projects throughout the 1980's, 90's and into the 2000's.  He maintained lifelong interests in politics and literary pursuits, completing a thesis on Hollywood blacklisting during the McCarthy "Red Scare" era, which was published in 1972 as "Only Victims: A Study of Show Business Blacklisting."  His published a memoir, "A Fortunate Life" (St. Martin's Griffin), in 2009.

June Vincent

June Vincent, born Dorothy June Smith, was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  She began her career in film during the early 1940s, eventually making the transition to television, where she became known as "television's favorite homewrecker."  She portrayed the leading lady Catherine Bennett in the noir film "Black Angel" (1946), also starring Dan Duryea, Peter Lorre and Broderick Crawford; as well as a minor part in another noir film "In a Lonely Place" (1950), starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame.

Vincent guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977) and the western action adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLMAN, portraying Jenny Morgan in "The Visitor" (episode 58).  She guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961); "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone.

Murvyn Vye

Murvyn Vye, born Marvin Wesley Vye, Jr., was an American stage, film and television actor who appeared in 100 movies and television shows during his 20-year career.  He studied acting at Yale University and was briefly associated with the Theatre Guild during the 1940s.  While working with the Guild, Vye was cast as Jigger Craigin in its 1945 production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Carousel."  The success of the production led to offers from Hollywood for Vye.  Homely and imposing, he was typecast as a heavy.  He had several memorable film roles, including Zoltan in the romantic adventure "Golden Earrings" (1947), starring Ray Millard and Marlene Dietrich; Merlin in the fantasy comedy "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" (1949), starring Bing Crosby; Ken Arok in the musical fantasy comedy "Road To Bali" (1952), starring Bob Hope, Bing Crosby and Dorothy Lamour; and George "Bugs" Moran in the biographical crime drama "Al Capone" (1959), starring Rod Steiger.

Vye guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), and the comedy "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971).  He also had a recurring role as Lionel in the adventure comedy "The Bob Cummings Show" (1961–1962).  Vye made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Jude Nichols in "Nora" (episode 75).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Deputy" (1959–1961) and "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).

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Max Wagner

Maxwell "Max" Wagner was a prolific Mexican-born American film and television actor, appearing mostly in uncredited roles.  He appeared in more than 350 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years, tending to be typecast as thugs or heavies.  He began his show business career performing in Spanish-language versions of English-language films, and later, was a Spanish-language acting coach.  He was involved in a sensational trial in 1927, in which his roommate, actor Paul Kelly, was tried for manslaughter in the death of vaudevillian Ray Raymond.  Wagner was the star prosecution witness against Kelly and his paramour, actress Dorothy MacKaye, resulting in convictions for both.  During World War II, Wagner served in the U.S. Army in the North African campaign.

Wagner had many film roles, including the taxi driver in the crime comedy "Charlie Chan in Shanghai" (1935), starring Warner Oland, as well as minor parts in the romantic drama "Morning Glory" (1933), starring Katharine Hepburn, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Adolphe Menjou; the crime drama "The Roaring Twenties" (1939), starring James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart and Priscilla Lane; the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), starring Henry Fonda and Jane Darwell; the Frank Capra classic "It's a Wonderful Life" (1942), starring James Stewart and Donna Reed; the western "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence" (1962), starring James Stewart, John Wayne, Vera Miles and Lee Marvin; and the film adaptation of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962), starring Gregory Peck.

Wagner guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966) and the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969).  He made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Stoddard in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35), a townsman in "The Spoiler" (episode 61), Prisoner Gibbons in "Seven" (episode 79) and a barfly in "Strange Town" (episode 81).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Bronco" (1958–1962), starring Ty Hardin; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  He appeared in 60 episodes of "Gunsmoke" (1955–1973) in uncredited roles, usually as a townsman.

Gary Walberg

Garry Walberg is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in nearly 100 movies and television shows during his 40-year career.  His few film roles include Adolph in the crime drama "Gangster Story" (1959), starring Walter Matthau; Martin Tilford in the western "Charro!" (1969), starring Elvis Presley; an uncredited role in the film adaptation of Michael Crichton's "The Andromeda Strain" (1971), starring Arthur, James Olson and Kate Reid; and Lt. Gen. Walton H. Walker in the biographical drama "MacArthur" (1977), starring Gregory Peck.  Walberg guest-starred in numerous popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), "M Squad" (1957–1960), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Ironside" (1967–1975), "Police Story" (1973–1977) , "Kojak" (1973–1978), "Mannix" (1967–1975), the mystery whodunit "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996), the medical dramas "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966) and "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family comedy "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis" (1959–1963), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the classic sci-fi series "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), and the undercover cop series "Mod Squad" (1968–1973).

Walberg also had recurring roles is several TV series, playing Police Sgt. Sullivan in the drama "Johnny Staccato" (1959); Sgt. Edward Goddard in the primetime soap opera "Peyton Place" (1964–1969); Mr. Guffy in the family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981); Speed in the comedy "The Odd Couple" (1970–1975), a role that he reprised in the TV movie "The Odd Couple: Together Again" (1993); and Lt. Frank Monahan in the medical forensic drama "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).

Walberg made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying a friend of the Colonel in "Lariat" (episode 67).  He guest-starred in several other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Gregory Walcott

Gregory Walcott, born Bernard Mattox, is an American television and film actor.  He has appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  After serving in the U.S. Army in the immediate aftermath of World War II, Walcott abandoned his home on the east coast to pursue an acting career in the west.  He made his film debut in "The Red Skies of Montana" (1952), playing a minor part.  His appearance portraying a Marine Corps drill instructor in "Battle Cry" (1955) landed him a contract with Warner Bros., and his portrayal of Sgt. Kiley in another Marine Corp film, "The Outsider" (1961), earned him a contract with Universal and a recurring leading role as Det. Roger Havilland in the crime drama "87th Precinct" (1961–1962).

Walcott appeared in numerous films.  He starred as Jeff Trent in Ed Wood's infamous B-movie "Plan 9 from Outer Space" (1959), Mitchell in the western "Joe Kidd" (1972), starring Clint Eastwood and Robert Duvall; a used car salesman in the crime caper "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot" (1974), starring Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges; and he made a cameo appearance as a potential film backer in the biographical comedy "Ed Wood" (1994), starring Johnny Depp, Martin Landau and Sarah Jessica Parker.

Walcott guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977), the crime drama "Kojak" (1973–1978), the murder mystery "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996) and the primetime drama "Dallas" (1978–1991).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Blade Kelly in "The Angry Gun" (episode 13) and Sid Halpern in "Tension" (episode 43).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961); "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood.

George Wallace

George Wallace, born George Dewey Wallace, was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 55 years.  Wallace worked as a coal miner during his teenage years and served in the Navy for eight years.  While working one of his various odd jobs, Wallace was discovered by the Hollywood columnist Jimmy Fiddler, who helped him on his way to becoming an actor.  He made his Broadway debut in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Pipe Dream" (1955).  He also co-starred with Mary Martin in the musical "Jennie" and was nominated for a New York Drama Critic's Circle Award for playing the male lead in "New Girl in Town" (1957) opposite Gwen Verdon.  His film roles included Bosun in the mystery sci-f film "Forbidden Planet" (1956), starring Fred M. Wilcox; Senator Joseph McCarthy in the biographical drama "The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover" (1977), starring Broderick Crawford; the judge in the film adaptation of Richard Wright's "Native Son" (1986), starring Victor Love; the male president in the family drama "Bicentennial Man" (1999), starring Robin Williams; and Chief Justice Pollard in the film adaptation of Phillip K. Dick's "Minority Report" (2002).  Wallace is perhaps best remembered for portraying Commando Cody in the movie serial "Radar Men from the Moon" (1952).

Wallace demonstrated versatility as a television actor, guest-starring in a wide variety of shows from 1950s through the 90s, including the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the family comedy "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974), the long-running family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), the Aaron Spelling fantasy-adventure series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the police drama "Hill Street Blues" (1981–1987), the sci-fi series "Star Trek: The Next Generation" (1987–1994), starring Patrick Stewart, the action series "JAG" (1995–2005), as well as the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Police Story" (1973–1977), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), "Kojak" (1973–1978) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  Wallace also had a recurring role as Mordecai in the family series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Andy Moon in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Harlan Warde

Harlan Warde was an American actor who appeared in 180 films and television series over a 40 year career.  Most of his early film roles were uncredited.  He appeared in 18 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank.  His character debuted in "The Safeguard" (episode 8).   Warde had recurring roles in other television series, many in the Western genre.  Among his many other TV credits, he also appeared in "Dragnet" ( 1954), "You Are There" (1953–1956), "Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre" (1955 1957), "Perry Mason" (1958–1966), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1962–1972), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969) and "The Fugitive" (1966 1967).

Midge Ware

Midge Ware, born Midge Ware Bendelson, is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in 30 movies and television shows during her 30-year career.  She had a few film roles, including Sari in the adventure film "The Prince Who Was a Thief" (1951), starring Tony Curtis and Piper Laurie; Doris Johnson in the crime film "Five Minutes to Live" (1961), starring country music legend Johnny Cash; and Mrs. Slade in the drama "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), starring Steve McQueen.  She guest-starred in some popular television shows in a variety of genres between 1960s and 80s, including the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), the family comedy "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971) and the forensic medical drama "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).  She also had recurring roles in two shows, playing WAC Corporal in the comedy "The Phil Silvers Show" (1955–1959) and Amby McAllister in the western "Gunslinger" (1961), co-starring Tony Young and Preston Foster.  Ware made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Hanna Shaw in "The Illustrator" (episode 88).  She also guest-starred in the western "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Steve Warren

Steve Warren appeared in more than 20 films and television shows during a decade-long career.  He had a few film roles, including minor parts in the war drama "Friendly Persuasion" (1956), starring Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire and Anthony Perkins; and the musical drama "Jailhouse Rock" (1957), starring Elvis Presley.

Warren made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Joe in "Honest Abe" (episode 118).  He guest-starred in the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), with most of his other television credits for westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; and "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller.

Charles Watts

Charles Watts was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows in a short but busy acting career of just 15 years.  Born in Clarksville, Tennessee in 1912, in his early life Watts was a high-school teacher and worked in local theater and tent shows.  He did not embark upon a full-fledged acting career until 1950; however, as a portly character actor, Watts was usually cast in supporting roles, frequently portraying glad-handing politicians, voluble businessmen and salesmen, wily bankers, and alternately avuncular or distrustful family elders.  His movie credits include the film adaption of Edna Ferber's "Giant" (1956) starring Rock Hudson, James Dean and Elizabeth Taylor, the romantic film classic "An Affair to Remember" (1957), starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, the biopic "The Spirit of St. Louis" (19557), starring James Stewart, "The Big Circus" (1959), starring Victor Mature and Rhonda Fleming, among many others.  He guest-starred in many popular shows, including the western "The Cisco Kid" (1951–1954), starring Duncan Renaldo, the comic book superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), starring George Reeves, the mystery anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1957–1968),the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), starring Jack Webb and Henry Morgan, and "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack.  Watts also appeared in lighter fare, including the family sitcom "Bachelor Father" (1959–1962), in which he played the recurring role of Judge Blandon, and the classic family comedy based on the comic strip "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), starring Jay North in the title role.

Watts made three appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Alvah Kemper in "The Brother-in-Law" (episode 5), Maury Cass in "Panic" (episode 47) and Joe Beaseley in "The Mescalero Curse" (episode 106).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Watts guest-starred in a number of other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring James Garner, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Dan Blocker, Pernell Roberts and Michael Landon.

Robert Webber

Robert Webber was a prolific American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 140 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, he served as a Marine during World War II.  After the war, he began working as a stage actor and appeared in several plays on Broadway; however, he would become a film and television actor primarily.  Webber had several memorable film roles, including Ward Hendricks in the drama "The Sandpiper" (1965), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Eva Marie Saint; General Denton in the action war drama "The Dirty Dozen" (1967), starring Lee Marvin; Hugh in the romantic comedy "10" (1979), starring Dudley Moore, Julie Andrews and Bo Derek; and Col. Clay Thornbush in the war comedy "Private Benjamin" (1980), starring Goldie Hawn.   He is best-remembered, however, for his portrayal of Juror number 12 in the drama "12 Angry Men" (1957), starring Henry Fonda.

Webber guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1960s through the 80s, including the crime dramas "Checkmate" (1960–1962), "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), "Mannix" (1967–1975), "Kojak" (1973–1978) and "The Rockford Files" (1974–1980), the horror series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964) and "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the fantasy anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the legal drama "Ironside" (1967–1975), the detective series "Cannon" (1971–1976) and the medical crime series "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).  He also had a recurring role as Alexander Hayes in the Bruce Willis-Cybill Shepherd comedy "Moonlighting" (1985–1989).  Webber made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Wes Carney in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17).  He also guest-starred in the western "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

Jack Wells

Jack Wells was an American film and television actor, as well as a newscaster and television personality.  He appeared in 25 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He worked as a newscaster for Channel 13 in Baltimore, Maryland, eventually leaving the station to host "The Jack Wells Show," Baltimore's first morning television show.  He portrayed the toastmaster in the landmark dramatic film "Brian's Song" (1971), starring James Caan, Billy Dee Williams, Jack Warden and Bernie Casey.

Wells guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), the crime drama anthology series "Police Story" (1973–1977), the action crime drama "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981), the primetime drama "Falcon Crest" (1981–1990) and the legal drama "L.A. Law" (1986–1994).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Carpenter in "Closer than a Brother" (episode 98).

Adam West

Adam West, born William West Anderson, is an American film, stage, television and voice actor.  He has appeared in more than 180 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 60 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, West graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in Literature, with a minor in Psychology.  Among his many film roles were his portrayals of William Lawrence III in the drama "The Young Philadelphians" (1959), starring Paul Newman and Barbara Rush; Col. Dan McReady in the sci-fi film "Robinson Crusoe on Mars" (1964), co-starring Paul Mantee and Victor Lundin; and a cameo role in the comedy "Drop Dead Gorgeous" (1999), starring Kirsten Dunst, Denise Richards and Ellen Barkin.  West is best-known for his portrayal of the title character (and alter-ego Bruce Wayne) in the campy superhero series "Batman" (1966–1968).  Although it was difficult to shrug off being typecast after his memorable superhero role, over the years, West revisited the role in various send-ups and spin-offs.  In recent years, he has lent his recognizable voice to the fictional Mayor Adam West in the popular animated comedy "Family Guy" (1999–present).  Other voice work includes other hit animated TV shows—"The Simpsons," "Rugrats," "Batman," "Animaniacs," "Jonny Bravo," "Spydogs," "The Super Adventure Team."  West also has performed voice roles for animated films, including Ace, Hollywood Chicken Little, in "Chicken Little" (2005), and Uncle Art in "Meet the Robinsons" (2007), both produced by Disney, and Leonard Fox in "Redux Riding Hood" (1998), which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short in 1998.

West has guest-starred in numerous popular shows of the 1950s through the 2000s, including the crime dramas "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the sci-fi anthology series "The Outer Limits" (1963–1965), and the Aaron Spelling adventure "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He also has played several recurring roles, including Captain Rick Wright in the comedy "The Last Precinct" (1986) and the voice of himself in the animated comedy "The Fairly OddParents" (2001–present).  West made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Christopher Ryan in "Stopover" (episode 107).  He guest-starred in many other popular westerns of the 1950s through 70s, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller, "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

James Westerfield

James Westerfield was a prolific American character actor of stage, film and television, as well as a director and producer.  His first love was the stage, and he produced and directed several plays on the summer theater circuit.  He appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows during his 35-year career.  Typecast as a heavy, Westerfield received two New York Drama Critics awards.  Although many of his film roles were uncredited, he appeared in many iconic films, often playing memorable characters, including the traffic cop in the Orson Welles adaptation of Booth Tarkington's "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942), starring Joseph Cotton, Dolores Costello and Anne Baxter and the biographical drama "The Pride of the Yankees" (1942), starring Gary Cooper; Henry Gilson in the noir film "Undercurrent" (1946), starring Katharine Hepburn, Robert Taylor and Robert Mitchum; Officer Hanson in the Disney comedy "The Shaggy Dog" (1959), starring Fred MacMurray, a role that he reprised in the Disney films "The Absent-Minded Professor" (1961) and "Son of Flubber" (1963), both starring Fred MacMurray; Jess Younger in the biographical drama "Birdman of Alcatraz" (1962), starring Burt Lancaster; a prisoner in the action film "Hang 'Em High" (1968), starring Clint Eastwood; and Judge Parker in the western "True Grit" (1969), starring John Wayne and Kim Darby.  Westerfield is best-remembered for his portrayal of Big Mac in Elia Kazan's award-winning crime drama "On the Waterfront" (1954), starring Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Rod Steiger and Eva Marie Saint.

Westerfield guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the crime dramas "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960) and "Mannix" (1967–1975), the suspense series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), Rod Serling's anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), and the fantasy comedy "Bewitched" (1964–1972).  He also had recurring roles playing John Murrel in the western "The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters" (1963–1964), starring Dan O'Herlihy and Kurt Russell, and the character Mr. Turner in the comedy "Hazel" (1961–1966), starring Shirley Booth.  Westerfield made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pa Healey in "The Woman" (episode 32) and Jake Preston in "The Fourflusher" (episode 72).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Texan" (1958–1960), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Brad Weston

Brad Weston appeared in 35 movies and television shows during his 20-year career.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the crime drama "Checkmate" (1960–1962), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964) and the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969).

Weston made one appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mark in "Silent Knife" (episode 89).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Branded" (1965–1966), starring THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors; and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Paul Wexler

Paul Wexler was an American character actor of film and television who appeared in 60 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  Tall and physically imposing, with a deep baritone voice, he was well-suited to play sinister characters and villains.  He made his film debut in the Bowery Boys comedy "Feudin' Fools" (1952), and his most notable film roles were Deputy Sheriff Slim Adams in the film noir thriller "Suddenly" (1954), starring Frank Sinatra and Hayden Sterling, and the arch villain Captain Seas in the adventure film "Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze" (1975), starring Ron Ely.  Most of his other film roles were minor, including an uncredited role in the Cecile B. DeMille Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring an all-star ensemble cast led by Charlton Heston; one of the voices in the Disney animated feature "One Hundred and One Dalmatians" (1961), starring Rod Taylor, Betty Lou Gerson and J. Pat O'Malley in the leading roles; and an uncredited role in the western "The Way West" (1967), starring Kirk Douglas, Robert Mitchum and Richard Widmark.

Wexler guest-starred in some of the most popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the police drama "Police Woman" (1974–1978) and the Aaron Spelling detective series "Charlie's Angels" (1976–1981).  Wexler made four appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cleek Watson in "The Pitchman" (episode 80), Les Foster in "The Queue" (episode 110), Harris in "Sheer Terror" (episode 113) and Joe Weiden in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  He guest-starred in several other popular westerns, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "The Guns of Will Sonnett" (1967–1969), starring Walter Brennan and Dack Rambo, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Daniel White

Daniel White was an American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 250 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 40 years, with many of his film roles uncredited.  He entered show business at the age of 14, traveling throughout the south participating in tent, minstrel, vaudeville and theatrical shows.  Grappling with financial difficulties, White took a break from acting to work for the Civilian Conservation Corps.  Following that stint, he worked on the Pan American Highway.  After returning from Panama, he found work with Republic Pictures Corporation and worked primarily in B-westerns, more often than not playing a villain.  He was offered the role of "Sam the bartender" in "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), but turned it down; although, he guest-starred in six episodes, twice playing a bartender (uncredited).

White had many film roles, including minor parts in the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind" (1939), starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh; the family drama "The Yearling" (1946), starring Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman; the western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" (1949), starring John Wayne and Joanne Dru; the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy, Bill Mauldin and Douglas Dick; the biblical epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter leading an ensemble cast; the noir film "Touch of Evil" (1958), starring Charlton Heston, Orson Welles and Janet Leigh; and the film adaptation of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962), starring Gregory Peck.

White guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the nautical action adventure "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961) and the crime drama "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964).  He made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mr. Russell in "The Brother-in-Law" (episode 5) and "Hostages to Fortune" (episode 160).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Christine White

Christine White is an American film and television actress.  She has appeared in more than 50 movies and television shows during her 25-year career.  She portrayed Carol McCoy in the Dirty Harry film "Magnum Force" (1973), starring Clint Eastwood.  She also had a recurring role as Abigail Adams in the comedy "Ichabod and Me" (1961–1962).

White guest-starred in several television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), the suspense anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (1955–1962), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ann Dodd in "The Visitor" (episode 58).  She also guest-starred in the westerns "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

Peter Whitney

Peter Whitney was an American television and film actor whose large frame and heavy-set, swarthy appearance brought him many roles playing villainous characters in his early career.  Later, as a character actor, he made frequent appearances in television series, particularly the western genre.  Among his film credits, he appeared in "In the Heat of the Night" (1967), "The Great Bank Robbery" (1969), and "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" (1970).  Whitney made nine appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Tracey Blanch in "Eddie's Daughter" (episode 46), John Jupiter in "Mail Order Groom" (episode 56), Andrew Bechtel in "Heller" (episode 62), Otto Drosheck in "Strange Town" (episode 81), Vince Fergus in "The Queue" (episode 110), John Holliver in "Long Gun from Tucson" (episode 121), Neb Jackman in 'Lou Mallory" (episode 145) and "Which Way Did They Go?" (episode 167), and Vantine in "Gun Shy" (episode 153).

Grace Lee Whitney

Grace Lee Whitney, born Mary Ann Chase, but also known as Ruth Whitney and Lee Whitney, is an American actress and vocalist.  She has appeared in more than 70 television shows and movies in a career spanning 60 years.  She began her career as an entertainer in music, opening in clubs for major acts, including Billie Holiday and Buddy Rich.  Her first film role was Laura Lambert in the western "Mystery Range" (1947).  Several of her early roles were uncredited.  Although a familiar face in TV westerns such as "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961) and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), Whitney also made numerous TV appearances in other genres, including "Star Trek" (1966–1969), playing the recurring role of Yeoman Janice Rand.  In addition to the television series, Whitney reprised her role as Rand in some of the "Star Trek" movies.  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Rose in "Tinhorn" (episode 134).

Richard Whorf

Richard Whorf was an American actor, director, writer and artist.  He appeared in 16 movies and television shows in a career spanning 25 years.  He was primarily a director, completing more than 40 movies and television shows during his lifetime.  He directed various westerns, including "Have Gun — Will Travel" (1957–1963) and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  Whorf made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, playing the role of Jeremiah Crowley in "The Illustrator" (episode 88).

Frank Wilcox

Frank Wilcox was an American character actor.  He performed in more than 300 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 40 years.  Many of his numerous roles were uncredited; however, Wilcox was a familiar face in many popular TV shows of his era.  He had a recurring role as Luis Rico in the Walt Disney television series "Zorro" (1957–1959) and in the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), portraying Beecher Asbury.  He played the role of judges in several episodes of "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  Wilcox is best-remembered for his role as the oil executive, John Brewster, in "The Beverly Hillbillies" (1962–1971).  Wilcox made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Colonel Cass in "The Sheridan Story" (episode 16).  He also guest-starred in "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961).

Robert J. Wilke

Robert J. Wilke was a prolific American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 300 movies and television shows during a career spanning 35 years, sometimes working as a stuntman.  A familiar face in westerns, Wilke was typecast as a heavy.  He portrayed Jim Pierce in the western "High Noon" (1952), starring Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly and Lloyd Bridges.  Following this role, Wilke began garnering roles in more prominent movies and television shows.  He had a recurring role as Capt. Mendoza in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959).

Wilke had many film roles, including Madden in the western "The Far Country" (1954), starring James Stewart; the First Mate of the Nautilus in the sci-fi adventure "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" (1954), starring Kirk Douglas, James Mason, Paul Lukas and Peter Lorre; the guard captain in the film adaptation of Howard Fast's "Spartacus" (1960), starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier and Jean Simmons; Wallace in the John Sturges epic western "The Magnificent Seven" (1960), starring Yul Brynner, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Eli Wallach, Robert Vaughn, Brad Dexter and James Coburn.  He portrayed the farm foreman in the romantic tragedy "Days of Heaven" (1978), starring Richard Grace, Brooke Adams and Sam Shepard; and in his final role, he played General Barnicke in the war comedy "Stripes" (1981), starring Bill Murray.

Wilke guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969) and the western action adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).

Wilke made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Florry Sheldon in "The Marshal" (episode 4) and Haskins in "The Pet" (episode 15).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore; The Gene Autry Show (1950–1956), Cheyenne (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  His actor friend Claude Akins, who also guest-starred in THE RIFLEMAN (episodes 8, 74 and 81), quipped that Wilke, who was a passionate golfer, earned more money playing golf than from acting.

Guy Wilkerson

Guy Wilkerson was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in nearly 190 movies and television shows during a career spanning 35 years.  Prior to becoming an actor, Wilkerson was a vaudevillian and burlesque artist.  Lanky and balding, with a dour demeanor, Wilkerson was a character actor who often portrayed undertakers, hangmen and jurors.  He portrayed a jury foreman in the film adaptation of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962), starring Gregory Peck, and he played the hangman in the western "True Grit" (1969), starring John Wayne, Kim Darby and Glen Campbell.

Wilkerson had many other films roles, including minor parts in the film adaptation of "Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind" (1939), starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh; the biographical sports drama "The Pride of the Yankees" (1942), starring Gary Cooper; the western "Winchester '73" (1950), starring James Stewart and Shelley Winters; the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy and Bill Mauldin; and the western "3:10 to Yuma" (1957), starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin.

Wilkerson guest-starred in several popular television shows, including the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967) and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the sheriff in "The Boarding House" (episode 22).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor.

George Willeford

George Willeford was not a professional actor, but was a television personality and trained musician.  He served in the Navy for three years during World War II, then proceeded to earn his M.A. in musical education from Indiana University.  During the 1950s and 60s, he was a local television personality in Indianapolis.  He also served as a weatherman for several years.  He was an accomplished violinist and composer.  He spent many years working as a professor, first at Indiana University teaching acting in radio and television, then later at Butler University, a private university in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he worked from 1971 to 1986.  Willeford made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mallery in "Skull" (episode 124).

Adam Williams

Adam Williams was an American actor with over 120 television credits in the 1950s through the 1970s.  He made six guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode.  He played Jake Pardee in "The Challenge" (episode 28), Corporal Troc in "The Prisoner" (episode 101), Jax in "The Score is Even" (episode 105), Russell Ganaway in "The Executioner" (episode 142), which he also wrote, Platt in "The Anvil Chorus" (episode 154), and Jeb Sherman in "Old Man Running" (episode 166).

Robert B. Williams

Robert Williams was an American television and film actor who appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He had roles in many obscure films of the 1930s and 40s, as well as innumerable uncredited roles in many well-known and classic films, including the the noir film "Lady in the Lake" (1947), starring Robert Montgomery, the drama "The Snake Pit" (1948), starring Olivia Havilland, Alfred Hitchcock's noir film "Strangers on a Train" (1951), starring Farley Granger and Ruth Roman, the musical comedy "Singin' in the Rain" (1952), starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds, the drama "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955), starring James Dean, the comedy "A Hole in the Head" (1959), starring Frank Sinatra, and the biographical drama "Birdman of Alzatraz" (1962), starring Burt Lancaster.

From the 1960s forward, Williams was a busy actor in television, guest-starring in many popular shows, including the family comedies "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" (1952–1966) and "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968), the medical dramas "Ben Casey" (1961–1966) and "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the espionage thriller "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), as well as the crime dramas "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Adam-12" (1968–1975), "Mannix" (1967–1975) and "Ironside" (1967–1975).  He had a few recurring roles, playing Dr. Dorfman in "Dennis the Menace" (1959–1963), Barney in the comedy series "Hazel" (1961–1966) and Garth Gimble Sr. in the short-lived comedy talk-show "Fernwood Tonight" (1977).

Williams made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Harrison in "The Silent Knife" (episode 89).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Rhys Williams

Rhys Williams was a Welsh character actor in movies and television, whose career spanned the 1940's through 1970.  He made his film debut in "How Green Was My Valley" (1941).  Rural Wales was the setting of this John Ford classic film, and it featured a large cast of Welsh characters; although, it was actually filmed in Hollywood with American, Irish and Scottish actors.  Williams, who was the only genuine Welshman in the cast, originally was hired as a dialect coach for the other actors, but director John Ford gave Williams a role in the film.

Williams is recognizable to fans of the television series "Adventures of Superman," in which he played a sadistic character in one of the show's early episodes, "The Evil Three."  Other television appearances included CBS's anthology series, "The DuPont Show with June Allyson," co-starring Steve Allen in the 1960 episode "Play Acting," and five episodes of General Electric Theater between 1956 and 1961.  Williams also appeared in "The Donna Reed Show" (1958), "Temple Houston" (1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1964), "Twelve O'Clock High" (1964-1966), "The F.B.I." (1966), "The Wild Wild West" (1966), "Mission Impossible" (1967), the "Andy Griffith Show" (1967), "Mannix" (1969), "Here Comes the Brides" (1969), among many other shows.  Williams appeared in six episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, one of six actors to portray the regular character, Doc Burrage.   He appeared in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35), "Bloodlines" (episode 42), "Letter of the Law" (episode 50), "A Case of Identity" (episode 57), "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), and "The Prodigal" (episode 71).

Dick Wilson

Dick Wilson, born Ricardo DiGuglielmo, was a British-born radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He began his career in radio at the age of fifteen.  Wilson anglicized his Italian name, concerned that he would be typecast for it.  After graduating from the Ontario College of Art & Design, he became a comic dancer in vaudeville.  At the outset of World War II, Wilson temporarily suspended his acting to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force, in which he served as a fighter pilot against the German Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain in 1940.  After the war ended, Wilson immigrated to America, where he become a naturalized citizen in 1954.

Despite his many film and television credits, Wilson is best-remembered for portraying Mr. Whipple, the finicky grocery store manager in the Charmin commercials, which he played for 25 years.  In honor of this role, Procter & Gamble provided Wilson with a free lifetime supply of Charmin toilet paper.  Wilson made a cameo appearance as a store manager in the fantasy comedy "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (1981), starring Lily Tomlin.

Wilson guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "The Munsters" (1964–1966), the Sally Field comedy "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the war comedy "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971) and the Aaron Spelling series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fred in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda.

Jeane Wood

Jeane Wood was an American film and television actress.  She appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly four decades.  She had several film roles, including Mrs. Buddy in the western "The Fastest Gun Alive" (1956), starring Glenn Ford; as well as minor parts in the Cecil B. DeMille Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter leading an ensemble cast; and the film adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958), starring Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman and Burl Ives.

Wood guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the family comedy Bachelor Father (1957–1962), crime dramas "M Squad" (1957–1960) and "Checkmate" (1960–1962), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967).  She made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Mrs. Svenson "The Vision" (episode 66).  She also guest-starred in the western "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; and "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury.

William Woodson

William "Bill" Woodson is an American film, television and voice actor.  He has appeared in nearly 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 60 years.  He has had a few memorable film roles, including the naval officer in the sci-fi drama "Escape from the Planet of the Apes" (1971), starring Roddy McDowall and Kim Hunter; and the Hexagon Oil commercial announcer in the action comedy "The Naked Gun 21/2: The Smell of Fear" (1991), starring Leslie Nielsen.  He has narrated many movies and television series, including the comedy "The Odd Couple" (1970–1975), the crime drama "Dick Tracy" (1950–1951), the sci-fi horror film "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms" (1953), the sci-fi drama "The Invaders" (1967–1968), and the war dramas "The Winds of War" (1983) and "War and Remembrance" (1988).  He also lent his voice to the character of J. Jonah Jameson in "Spider-Man" (1981–1987); however, he is most often recognized for his work on the "Super Friends" franchise, including his narration of "The All-New Super Friends Hour" (1977–1978), "Challenge of the Superfriends" (1978) and "Super Friends" (1980–1983), as well as reprising his role as the "Super Friends" narrator in the satirical animated comedy "Family Guy" (1999–present).

Woodson has guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1960s through the present day, including the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964) and "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), and the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970).  He has also had several recurring roles, including Sgt. Ed Blankley in the crime drama "This Man Dawson" (1959) and the Secretary of War in the western war comedy "F Troop" (1965–1967).  Woodson made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the Sheriff of Red Wood in "Outlaw's Shoes" (episode 141).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor, and "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone.

Stephen Wootton

Stephen Arthur Wootton is an American actor who has worked primarily in television.  He has appeared in 30 movies and television shows during a decade-long career.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the family comedy "I Love Lucy" (1951–1957), the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960) and the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963).  Wootton made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Willie in "Tin Horn" (episode 134).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), starring Hugh O'Brian.

Dale Wright

Dale Wright made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Dave Croton in "Incident at Line Shack 6" (episode 156).

Than Wyenn

Than Wyenn is an American film and television actor who has appeared in more than 140 movies and television shows during a 30-year career.  He has had many film roles, including Ambassador Gaufridi in the award-winning film adaptation of Jerzy Kozinski's novella "Being There" (1979), starring Peter Sellers and Shirley MacLaine and Melvyn Douglas; as well as minor parts in Cecil B. DeMille's Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter heading an ensemble cast; and the crime caper "Gambit" (1966), starring Shirley MacLaine and Michael Caine.  He also had a recurring role as Licenciardo Pina in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959).

Wyenn guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the crime dramas "The Untouchables" (1959–1963) and "Arrest and Trial" (1963–1964), the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver" (1957–1963), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the espionage thrillers "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), the adventure drama "It Takes a Thief" (1968–1970), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the crime drama "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1903), the action adventure series "The Six Million Dollar Man" (1974–1978) and "Knight Rider" (1982–1986), and the forensic medical drama "Quincy M.E." (1976–1983).

Wyenn made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Ramos in "The Vaqueros" (episode 111).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

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X Brands

X Brands was an American actor who worked primarily in television, especially the western genre.  He appeared in more than 60 movies and television shows during a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He had a few memorable film roles, including Tago in the western "Escort West" (1958), starring Victor Mature, Elaine Stewart and Faith Domergue; Hook in the western "Santee" (1973), starring Glenn Ford and Dana Wynter; and Marty Brenner in the action drama "Avalanche" (1978), starring Rock Hudson and Mia Farrow.  Despite his European heritage, X Brands is best-remembered for his portrayals of Native American characters, particularly Pahoo-Ka-Ta-Wah in the western "Yancy Derringer" (1958–1959), co-starring Jock Mahoney and Kevin Hagen.

X Brands guest-starred in a handful of popular television shows other than westerns, including the espionage adventure series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968) and "Mission: Impossible" (1966–1973), as well as the crime drama "Adam-12" (1968–1975).  He also had a recurring role as Nock-Ay-Del in the western "The High Chaparral" (1967–1971).  X Brands made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Pretty Man Longden in "The Clarence Bibbs Story" (episode 104).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, both film and television, including "Cowboy G-Men" (1952), "The Adventures of Kit Carson" (1951–1955), "Judge Roy Bean" (1956), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" (1954–1959), "The Adventures of Jim Bowie" (1956–1958), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).  He also had the opportunity to work with THE RIFLEMAN's Chuck Connors in his later hit series "Branded" (1965–1966).

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Jeff York

Jeff York, born Granville Owen Scofield, was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 70 movies and television shows during a career spanning 30 years.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his portrayal of Bud Searcy in the Disney classic "Old Yeller" (1957), starring Dorothy McGuire, Fess Parker and Tommy Kirk; and its sequel, "Savage Sam" (1963), starring Brian Keith, Kevin Corcoran and Tommy Kirk.  He also had several recurring roles, portraying Mike Fink in two episodes of Disney's popular miniseries "Davy Crockett" (1954–1955), in which he appeared opposite Fess Parker; he played Joe Crane in the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959) and Reno McKee in the short-lived adventure series "The Alaskans" (1959–1960).

York had many other film roles, including Blair in the noir film "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946), starring Lana Turner and John Garfield; as well as minor parts in John Huston's "Asphalt Jungle" (190), starring Sterling Hayden and Louis Calhern; and the romantic comedy "Father of the Bride" (1950), starring Spencer Tracy, Joan Bennett and Elizabeth Taylor.  He guest-starred in several popular television shows of the 1950s and 60s, including the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990) and the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John J. Mack in "None so Blind" (episode 135).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore; "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Victor Sen Young

Victor Sen Young was an American film and television character actor.  He appeared in more than 150 movies and television shows during a career spanning 40 years.  He made his film debut playing a minor part in the film adaptation of Pearl S. Buck's "The Good Earth" (1937), starring Paul Muni and Luise Rainer.  Most of his early film work consisted of portraying "number two son" in the Charlie Chan film serial of the 1930s and 40s.  Like other Chinese-American actors, Young was cast in Japanese roles during World War II such as the character Joe Totsuiko in the John Huston drama "Across the Pacific" (1942), starring Humphrey Bogart.  Young took a break from acting to serve in the U.S. Army Air Forces.

Following his service, Young returned to Hollywood.  He had a few other notable film roles, including John Wang in the drama "The Left Hand of God" (1955), starring Humphrey Bogart and Gene Tierney.  He is perhaps best-remembered for his recurring role as Hop Sing in the long-running western "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  In 1972, Young was the victim of a shooting that took place onboard a hijacked Pacific Southwest Airlines plane.  He managed to survive the shooting, but fell victim to accidental asphyxiation at his home a few years later.  Fellow Bonanza actor Pernell Roberts delivered the eulogy at his funeral.  Each year, the Chinese Alumni Association of his alma mater, University of California, Berkeley, awards a memorial scholarship in his honor.

Young guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), the detective drama "Richard Diamond: Private Detective" (1957–1960), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the espionage thriller "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." (1964–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970) and the western action adventure "Kung Fu" (1972–1975).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Wang Chi in "The Queue" (episode 110).  He guest–starred in a few other westerns, including "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; and "Bronco" (1958–1962), starring Ty Hardin.

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Bill Zuckert

Bill Zuckert was an American radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during a career spanning 50 years.  He began working in radio, but took a break from acting to serve as a member of the Seabees Naval Construction Battalion during World War II.  A veteran character actor, most of his roles were in televsion; although, he appeared in several major films, including playing the sheriff in the western "Hang 'Em High" (1968), starring Clint Eastwood and directed by THE RIFLEMAN director Ted Post; as well as a minor part in the drama "Cincinnati Kid" (1965), starring Steve McQueen; an uncredited speaking role in the blockbuster war drama "Tora! Tora! Tora!" (1970), starring So Yamamura, Jason Robards and Joseph Cotten; and an uncredited bit part in Mel Brooks' western spoof "Blazing Saddles" (1974), starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder and Slim Pickens.  Two decades later he was still working, playing Mr. Finkle in the comedy "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective" (1994), starring Jim Carrey, and the old man in the action comedy "Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult" (1994), starring Leslie Nielsen and Priscilla Presley.

Zuckert guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the crime drama "Mannix" (1967–1975), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the science fiction cult classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the anthology series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990) and the detective drama "Columbo" (1971–2003), among scores of other shows.

Zuckert made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Debo Lee in "The Long Goodbye" (episode 119).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), starring Clint Walker; "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck; "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), hosted by Robert Taylor; "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.

 

 

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