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"Trail of Hate"

Episode 77

Writer:  Calvin J. Clements

Director:  Arnold Laven

Original Air Date:  9/27/1960

 

Cast

Chuck Connors as Lucas McCain

Johnny Crawford as Mark McCain

Paul Fix as Marshal Micah Torrance

Johnny Crawford and Chuck Connors

 

A trio of bank robbers forces Lucas to help them rob the North Fork Bank by holding Mark hostage and threatening to kill him, if Lucas does not cooperate with them.  Leaving one man behind to guard Mark, the other two take Lucas into town and successfully pull off the robbery.  Mark, in the meantime, tries to escape his guard, but falls and strikes his head.  When Lucas returns to the ranch and finds Mark unconscious, he is determined to find the criminals.  After calling a doctor to look after Mark, he sets out on the trail.  He finds the three outlaws and forces them to start walking back to North Fork.  Consumed by a desire for revenge, Lucas nearly makes a terrible mistake.

Guest Cast

Harvey Johnson as Nooley Stark

Harvey Johnson appeared in 11 movies and television shows in about as many years.  He had minor parts in the Bud Yorkin comedies "Come Blow Your Horn" (1963), starring Frank Sinatra, and "Divorce American Style" (1967), starring Dick Van Dyke, Debbie Reynolds and Jason Robards.  He also guest-starred in a few popular television shows of the 1960s and 70s, including the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), created by Blake Edwards and starring Craig Stevens, Herschel Bernardi and Lola Albright, and the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), starring Fred MacMurray and Don Grady.  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nooley Stark in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77).  He also guest-starred in the western "Maverick" (1957–1962), starring Jack Kelly and James Garner.

Jack Kruschen as Doc Burrage

Jack Kruschen was a Canadian actor whose career began on stage, but he became a character actor in both movies and television.  In his 50-year career, with more than 200 screen credits, he played virtually every kind of role.  Often cast in comedic ethnic roles, Kruschen occasionally landed a role as a villain, but more often was cast as the volatile, emotional Italian or Jewish neighbor patriarch.  He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in "The Apartment" (1960).  Kruschen appeared in four episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the Clyde Bailey in "The Retired Gun" (episode 17), Sammy in "One Went to Denver" (episode 25).  He was one of six actors to play Doc Burrage, appearing in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77) and "Baranca" (episode 82).

Marc Lawrence as Cougar

Marc Lawrence was an American actor who appeared in more than 200 films and television shows in a career spanning more than 70 years.  The majority of Lawrence's early roles were uncredited.  He was often typecast as a shady character, playing gangsters and mob bosses.  When he was investigated by the House Un-American Activities Committee, Lawrence was blacklisted, so he moved to Europe, where he continued working as an actor.  Eventually, he returned to the United States and resumed playing villains in film and television, including in two James Bond movies, "Diamonds Are Forever" (1971) and "The Man With the Golden Gun" (1974).

Lawrence made his first television appearance as a guest on the western series "Wagon Train" (1957–1965).  He also appeared in "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Lawrence made two guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Gavin in "The Safe Guard" (episode 8) and Cougar in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77).  In 1991, Lawrence published his autobiography, "Long Time No See: Confessions of a Hollywood Gangster."  He was also the subject of a novel by Jonathan Held, "The Beautiful and the Profane," published in 2003, two years before his death.

Harold J. Stone as Ben Stark

Harold J. Stone was an American film and television character actor.  Born Harold Hochstein to a Jewish acting family, he began his career on Broadway in 1939.  He made his motion picture debut in the Alan Ladd film, "The Blue Dahlia" (1946). He went to work in small but memorable roles in films that included "The Harder They Fall" (1956) with Humphrey Bogart, Alfred Hitchcock's "The Wrong Man" (1956), "Somebody Up There Likes Me" (1956), "Spartacus" (1960), "Girl Happy" (1965) and the gangster epic, "The St. Valentine's Day Massacre" (1967), in which he played Chicago mobster Frank Nitti.

Stone became a recognizable face to television viewers, appearing in many police dramas, including "77 Sunset Strip" (1958), "Naked City" (1958), "The Untouchables" (1959), "Mannix" (1967), "Mission: Impossible" (1966), "The Rockford Files" (1974) and "Kojak" (1973). and having made more than 150 guest appearances on numerous television shows that included "I Spy" (1967), "The Barbara Stanwyck Show" (1961), "Griff" (1973), "The Untouchables" (1960–1963), "The Twilight Zone" (1961), "Hogan's Heroes" (1968–1971), and "Get Smart" (1966).  He had a recurring role in the short-lived series "Bridget Loves Bernie" (1972–1973), starring Meredith Baxter and David Birney.  Stone also appeared in three episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, playing Oat Jackford in "Home Ranch" (episode 2), Ben Stark in "Trail of Hate" (episode 77) and the Marshal in "The Bullet" (163).

In the 1960s and 70s, while still working in television, Stone returned to the stage, directing several off-Broadway and off-off-Broadway productions, including "Ernest in Love" and "Charley's Aunt."

Harlan Warde as John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank

Harlan Warde was an American actor who appeared in 180 films and television series over a 40 year career.  Most of his early film roles were uncredited.  He appeared in 18 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank.  His character debuted in "The Safeguard" (episode 8).   Warde had recurring roles in other television series, many in the Western genre.  Among his many other TV credits, he also appeared in "Dragnet" ( 1954), "You Are There" (1953–1956), "Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre" (1955 1957), "Perry Mason" (1958–1966), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1962–1972), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969) and "The Fugitive" (1966 1967).

 

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