Customer Service +1 310 278-9820

Welcome to North Fork

Return to Season 1 Index

"The Money Gun"
Episode 33
Writer: Bruce Geller
Director: Sam Peckinpah
Original Air Date 05/12/1959

Cast

Chuck Connors as Lucas McCain

Johnny Crawford as Mark McCain

Paul Fix as Marshal Micah Torrance



Guest Cast
John Dehner as Tom King
John Dehner as Tome King in The Money Gun

John Dehner was an American actor of radio, film and television.  In a career spanning nearly 50 years he appeared in more than 260 movies and television shows.  Often cast as villains, he was tall and distinguished and lent an urbane and droll personae to the characters he played.  Dehner made four guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying different characters in each episode, including Tom King in "The Money Gun" (episode 33), Al Walker in "The Blowout" (episode 43), Wood Bartell in "The Baby Sitter" (episode 52), and Major Aaron King in "The Prisoner" (episode 101).

Bert Freed as Oat Jackford

Bert Freed was an American actor whose career spanned nearly 40 years.  Born and raised in the Bronx, he began his acting career while attending Penn State University, making his Broadway debut in the 1942 production, "Johnny Two by Four."  His film debut was an uncredited role in the musical "Carnegie Hall" (1947).

Freed was a versatile actor who appeared in more than 75 films and 200 television shows.  He played a wide range of characters—from villains and criminals to their law and order counterparts and the occasional avuncular, good-natured family man.  Whether portraying a gangster or a detective, Freed elicited his character's sympathic or detestable qualities with equal persuasiveness.

His films credits include "Halls of Montezuma" (1950), "Where the Sidewalk Ends" (1950), "The Desperate Hours" (1955), "Paths of Glory" (1957), "Fate Is the Hunter" (1964), "Detective Story" (1951), "Wild in the Streets" (1968), "Billy Jack" (1971) and "Norma Rae" (1979).

Freed made numerous television appearances from the 1950's until his death in 1986.  He guest starred in shows of almost every genre, but was seen with most frequently in detective shows and westerns, including "Gunsmoke" (1959–1965), "Perry Mason (1960–1964), 15 episodes of "Shane" (1966), "The Big Valley" (1966–1968), "The Virginian" (1973–1971), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1976–1977) and "Charlies's Angels" (1978).   Freed appeared in two episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Oat Jackford in "The Money Gun" (episode 33) and Ben Crown in "Short Rope for a Tall Man" (episode 103).

Frank Hagney as the Blacksmith

Frank Hagney was a prolific Australian film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 400 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  Despite his voluminous filmography, many of his roles were uncredited.  He began acting in films during the silent era.  His roles from this period include "Spike" Kelly in the drama "The Battler" (1919), Dick Blackwell in the western "The Silent Stranger" (1924), and Daggoo in "The Sea Beast" (1926), which was a film adaptation of "Moby Dick."  Although he rarely portrayed leading roles, Hagney often brushed shoulders with Hollywood heavyweights.  He was in the romantic western "Ride Him, Cowboy" (1932), starring John Wayne, the film adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.  Hyde" (1941), starring Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner, the family drama "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946), starring James Stewart and Donna Reed, the comedy western "Paleface" (1948), starring Bob Hope and Jane Russell, and the action-adventure film "3:10 to Yuma" (1957), starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin.

Most of Hageny's more significant television roles were in the western genre. He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Nils in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He also guest-starred in "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), starring William Boyd, "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), starring Clayton Moore, "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.

Earl Hodgins as the Auctioneer

Earle Hodgins was a prolific American character actor in film and television.  He appeared in more than 300 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He is best-remembered for his portrayals of fast-talking pitchmen, carnival barkers, auctioneers and assorted snake oil salesmen and charlatans; although, most of his roles were uncredited and many did not give him the opportunity to demonstrate his gift for rapid-fire delivery.  In film, Hodgins was a remarkably versatile actor, appearing in everything from westerns to romantic comedies.  He appeared in more than 100 (mostly) B-westerns, including "Paradise Canyon" (1935), "Borderland" (1937), "Idaho" (1943), "Forty Thieves" (1944), "The Devil's Playground" (1946), "Return of the Bad Men" (1948) and "The Paleface" (1948), the horror film "The Walking Dead" (1936), the romantic comedy "My Favorite Wife" (1940), the crime drama "Criminals Within" (1943), the superhero adventure "Batman" (1943), and the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's classic novel "East of Eden" (1955).  After many years as a film actor, Hodgins segued into television, continuing to be a familiar presence in the western genre.  He guest-starred in several other popular series of the early television era, including the crime drama "Boston Blackie" (1951–1953), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), the action series "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959) and Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964).  In addition to his significant contributions to film and television, Hodgins lent his voice to the Porky Pig cartoons of the 1930s.

Hodgins made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying the auctioneer in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He also guest-starred in many other classic westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Annie Oakley" (1954–1956), "The Cisco Kid" (1950–1956), "The Range Rider" (1951–1953), "Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock" (1951–1958), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Hopalong Cassidy" (1952–1954), "Sky King" (1951–1962), "The Lone Ranger" (1949–1957), "The Gene Autry Show" (1950–1956), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Lawman" (1958–1962), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).

Jason Johnson as Cramer

Jason Johnson was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 90 movies and television shows during a career spanning almost 30 years.  He had several film roles, including Dr. Benedict in the Michael Crichton medical thriller "The Andromeda Strain" (1971), starring Arthur Hill, James Olson and Kate Reid; as well as minor parts in the biographical drama "I Want to Live!" (1958), starring Susan Hayward; and the drama "Valley of the Dolls" (1967), starring Barbara Perkins, Patty Duke and Sharon Tate.  He also guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the anthology series "Playhouse 90" (1956–1960), the superhero series "Adventures of Superman" (1952–1958), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the family comedy "My Three Sons" (1960–1972), the family dramas "Lassie" (1954–1975) and "The Waltons" (1971–1981), the medical drama "Dr. Kildare" (1961–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "The Andy Griffith Show" (1960–1968) and the espionage thriller "Mission Impossible" (1966–1973).

Johnson made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Cramer in "The Dead-Eye Kid" (episode 20) and Bert Sanderson in "Money Gun" (episode 33).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Laramie" (1959–1963), starring John Smith and Robert Fuller; "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), starring Dick Powell; "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen; "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts; Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness; and "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), starring Barbara Stanwyck.

William Phipps as Asa Manning

William Phipps is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 50 years, working primarily in televsion in the science fiction and western genres.  He has had roles in several memorable films, including uncredited parts in the war drama "The Red Badge of Courage" (1951), starring Audie Murphy, Bill Mauldin, Douglas Dirk and Royal Dano, and in the post-World War II drama "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" (1956), starring Gregory Peck, Jennifer Jones and Fredric March.  He played the servant to Antony in the historical drama "Julius Caesar" (1953), starring Louis Calhern, Marlon Brando, James Mason and John Gielgud; and he portrayed Wash Perry in the science fiction film "The War of the Worlds" (1953), starring Gene Barry and Ann Robinson  He lent his voice to the role of Prince Charming in the classic Disney animated feature "Cinderella" (1950).  In his only leading role, he played Michael in the sci-fi film "Five" (1951).  His last role prior to retiring was in the independent film "Sordid Lives" (2000), which he also produced.

Phipps guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 80s, including the crime drama "M Squad" (1957–1960), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the macabre anthology series "Thriller" (1960–1962), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the private detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the war drama "Combat!" (1962–1967), the superhero parody "Batman" (1966–1968), the western action adventure "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the police drama "Mod Squad" (1968–1973), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983) and the murder mystery "Murder, She Wrote" (1984–1996).

He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Asa Manning in "The Money Gun" (episode 33).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "The Virginian" (1962–1971) and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).  Phipps also guest-starred in Chuck Connors' later television series "Branded" (1965–1966).

Harlan Warde as John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank
Harlan Warde as John Hamilton, President of the No

Harlan Warde was an American actor who appeared in 180 films and television series over a 40 year career.  Most of his early film roles were uncredited.  He appeared in 18 episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, portraying John Hamilton, President of the North Fork Bank.  His character debuted in "The Safeguard" (episode 8).   Warde had recurring roles in other television series, many in the Western genre.  Among his many other TV credits, he also appeared in "Dragnet" ( 1954), "You Are There" (1953–1956), "Jane Wyman Presents The Fireside Theatre" (1955 1957), "Perry Mason" (1958–1966), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Bonanza" (1962–1972), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969) and "The Fugitive" (1966 1967).


Lucas has carried bitterness and ill-feeling for Oat Jackford for years, ever since he and Mark first moved to North Fork, and Jackford burned their ranch house in an attempt to drive them off the property that he wanted for himself.  However, when a hired gunman arrives in North Fork and announces that he has been paid to kill Oat Jackford, Lucas finds himself on the side of the man he used to hate.

The Rifleman® is a servicemark of Levy-Gardner-Laven Productions, Inc. and is registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office

© Levy-Gardner-Laven Productions, Inc. - 2018 – all rights reserved | www.therifleman.net Distributor: LGL Licensing LLC

Privacy policy | Terms of Use | Browser Compatibility