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"Sins of the Father"
Episode 70
Writer: Philip Saltzman
Director: Ted Post
Original Air Date 04/19/1960

Cast

Chuck Connors as Lucas McCain

Johnny Crawford as Mark McCain

Paul Fix as Marshal Micah Torrance



Guest Cast
Richard Evans as Shep Colman

Richard Evans is an American film and television actor.  He has appeared in more than 80 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 50 years.  He has guest-starred in various popular shows, including the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starring Lloyd Bridges, the adventure series "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), starring David Janssen, the prime-time soap opera "Peyton Place" (1964–1969), in which he had a recurring role as Paul Hanley.  Evans also appeared in the iconic crime drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), starring Raymond Burr, and the sci-fi classic "Star Trek" (1966–1969), starring William Shatner.

Evans made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Shep Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), and Bruce Henry in "A Young Man's Fancy" (episode 129).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, Evans guest-starred in a number of other westerns, including "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), and "Bonanza" (1959–1973).

Kelton Garwood as Tom Coleman

Kelton Garwood was an American film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 40 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 30 years.  He studied acting at American Theatre Wing in New York.  In preparation for working in the western genre, he took horse-riding and quick-draw lessons.  He appeared in a small number of films, including "Miracle of the Hills" (1959), "Story of Ruth" (1960), "The Sandpiper" (1966), and his last film, "Return to Snowy River" (1988).   He guest-starred in the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), starring Craig Stevens, the nautical action-adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), starrring Lloyd Bridges, Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), in which he portrayed the Tramp, and the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), starring Robert Stack.  Garwood made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Smith in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35) and Tom Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  In addition to THE RIFLEMAN, he guest-starred in several other popular westerns of the 1950s and 60s, including "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), starring Richard Boone, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring Ward Bond and later John McIntire, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, and "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), starring Fess Parker.  He was a regular on "Bourbon Street Beat" (1959–1960), playing Beauregard O'Hanlon, and on "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975) he had a recurring role as Percy Crump, the undertaker.

Kay E. Kuter as Rafe Coleman

Kay E. Kuter, born Kay Edwin Emmert Kuter, was an American actor who worked in film, stage and television.  His filmography lists more than 120 movies and television credits in a career spanning 50 years.  Born into a show business family, his father was pioneer art director Leo "K" Kuter and his mother was silent screen actress Evelyn Edler.  After he graduated from Carnegie Mellon University, Kuter began acting and directed more than 50 plays.  He was typecast as a heavy and was known for his distinctive beard.  He guest-starred in many popular shows of the 1950s through the 90s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the action series "The Wild Wild West" (1965–1969), the family comedy "I Dream of Jeannie" (1965–1970), the western adventure series "Kung Fu" (1972–1975), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964) and the sci-fi series "Star Trek: The Next Generation" (1987–1994).  He also had a recurring role as Newt Kiley in the comedy series "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970) and "Green Acres" (1965–1970).  Kuter also worked as a voice actor, and among his many roles, provided the voices for Grimsby in "The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea" (2000); Griswold Goodsoup and Dockmaster Velasco in the acclaimed adventure games "The Curse of Monkey Island" (1997) and "Grim Fandango" (1998), respectively.

Kuter made two appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Rafe Coleman in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70) and Charve Banner in "The Lonesome Bride" (episode 108).  He guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson, "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts, "The Virginian" (1962–1971), starring James Drury, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), starring James Arness.

Eugene Martin (Mazzola) as Bobby Moon

Eugene Martin, born Eugene Mazzola, is an American television and film actor and also a producer, production manager and assistant director.  He has appeared in nearly 50 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than six decades.  Born into a family in the entertainment industry, he had his first film role portraying the infant Anthony Caruso in "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), and he went on to enjoy a successful career as a child actor.  Among the memorable films in which he appeared, Martin/Mazzola played the role of the son of Rameses in Cecile B. DeMille's Bible epic "The Ten Commandments" (1956), starring an ensemble cast led by Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, Ann Baxter and Edward G. Robinson; and he portrayed Edward V in the historical horror drama "Tower of London" (1962), starring Vincent Price and Michael Pate.  He took a break from acting to serve in the Navy from 1968 to 1970.  Upon returning from Vietnam, he worked as a photojournalist for the Navy in San Diego.  He enrolled in college and returned to working in the film industry, but this time behind the camera.  During his long career, he has worked in several different capacities—as a second assistant director, producer and production manager.

Martin guest-starred in many popular television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the Disney adventure series "Zorro" (1957–1959), the police detective series "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the action crime drama "Highway Patrol" (1955–1959), the private eye series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the nautical adventure series "Sea Hunt" (1958–1961), the family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974) and the police drama "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977).  He also had a recurring role as Joey Drum in the western "Jefferson Drum" (1958–1959).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Bobby Moon in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  Martin guest-starred in several other westerns, including "Wanted: Dead or Alive" (1958–1961), starring Steve McQueen, "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond, "Rawhide" (1959–1966), starring Clint Eastwood, "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry, and "Bonanza" (1959–1973), starring Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts.  Among Mazzola's many production and AD'ing credits are "Capone" (1975), starring Ben Gazzara and Susan Blakely; "Brainstorm" (1983), starring Christopher Walken and Natalie Wood in her last role; "Little Buddha" (1993), starring Keanu Reeves and Bridget Fonda; "End of the Spear" (2005), starring Louie Leonardo; "Love Happens" (2009), starring Jennifer Aniston and Aaron Eckhart; and "The Details" (2011), starring Elizabeth Banks and Tobey Maguire.

Charles Tannen as the Bartender
Charles Tannen

Charles Tannen, born Charles David Tannen, was an American television and film actor who appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows during his 30-year career.  He had uncredited roles in numerous films, including the romantic drama "The Dark Angel" (1935), starring Fredric March and Merle Oberon; the biographical drama "Young Mr. Lincoln" (1939), starring Henry Fonda; the crime drama "The Street with No Name" (1948), starring Mark Stevens and Richard Widmark; the landmark sci-fi drama "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (1951), starring Michael Rennie and Patricia Neal; and the sci-fi horror film "The Fly" (1958), starring David Hedison and Vincent Price.  Although his uncredited roles outnumber the credited ones, Tannen was cast in significant parts in several Henry Fonda films, including Charles Ford in the westerns "Jesse James" (1939) and "The Return of Frank James" (1940), and Joe in the film adaptation of John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940).

Tannen guest-starred in many television shows of the 1950s through the 70s, including the family comedy "Father Knows Best" (1954–1960), the crime drama "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), the mystery action series "Peter Gunn" (1958–1961), the family comedy "Mister Ed" (1958–1966), the legal drama "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), the long-running family drama "Lassie" (1954–1974), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series, "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), and the comedy "Petticoat Junction" (1963–1970).  Tannen made six guest appearances in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Barney the barber in "The Boarding House" (episode 22), the bartender in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), Josh Moore in "The Jailbird" (episode 73) and "Woman from Hog Ridge" (episode 78), Mr. Penn in "Miss Milly" (episode 84), and Jack Carson in "The Actress" (episode 94).  He guest-starred in many other westerns, including "The Roy Rogers Show" (1951–1957), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "Have Gun – Will Travel" (1957–1963), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "Bonanza" (1959–1973), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963) and "Rawhide" (1959–1966).

George Wallace as Andy Moon

George Wallace, born George Dewey Wallace, was an American stage, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 200 movies and television shows in a career spanning nearly 55 years.  Wallace worked as a coal miner during his teenage years and served in the Navy for eight years.  While working one of his various odd jobs, Wallace was discovered by the Hollywood columnist Jimmy Fiddler, who helped him on his way to becoming an actor.  He made his Broadway debut in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Pipe Dream" (1955).  He also co-starred with Mary Martin in the musical "Jennie" and was nominated for a New York Drama Critic's Circle Award for playing the male lead in "New Girl in Town" (1957) opposite Gwen Verdon.  His film roles included Bosun in the mystery sci-f film "Forbidden Planet" (1956), starring Fred M. Wilcox; Senator Joseph McCarthy in the biographical drama "The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover" (1977), starring Broderick Crawford; the judge in the film adaptation of Richard Wright's "Native Son" (1986), starring Victor Love; the male president in the family drama "Bicentennial Man" (1999), starring Robin Williams; and Chief Justice Pollard in the film adaptation of Phillip K. Dick's "Minority Report" (2002).  Wallace is perhaps best remembered for portraying Commando Cody in the movie serial "Radar Men from the Moon" (1952).

Wallace demonstrated versatility as a television actor, guest-starring in a wide variety of shows from 1950s through the 90s, including the adventure series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the family comedy "The Brady Bunch" (1969–1974), the long-running family drama "The Waltons" (1971–1981), the Aaron Spelling fantasy-adventure series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984), the family drama "Little House on the Prairie" (1974–1983), the police drama "Hill Street Blues" (1981–1987), the sci-fi series "Star Trek: The Next Generation" (1987–1994), starring Patrick Stewart, the action series "JAG" (1995–2005), as well as the crime dramas "Dragnet" (1951–1959), "77 Sunset Strip" (1958–1964), "Perry Mason" (1957–1966), "Police Story" (1973–1977), "The Streets of San Francisco" (1972–1977), "Kojak" (1973–1978) and "Barnaby Jones" (1973–1980).  Wallace also had a recurring role as Mordecai in the family series "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" (1954–1990).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Andy Moon in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  He guest-starred in numerous other westerns of the 1950s through the 70s, including "Death Valley Days" (1952–1975), "The Deputy" (1959–1961), "Maverick" (1957–1962), "Zane Grey Theater" (1956–1961), "The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp" (1955–1961), "Rawhide" (1959–1966), "Cheyenne" (1955–1963), "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), "Laramie" (1959–1963), "The Virginian" (1962–1971), "Daniel Boone" (1964–1970), "The Big Valley" (1965–1969), "Bonanza" (1959–1973, and "Gunsmoke" (1955–1975).

Rhys Williams as Doc Burrage
Rhys Williams as Doc Burrage

Rhys Williams was a Welsh character actor in movies and television, whose career spanned the 1940's through 1970.  He made his film debut in "How Green Was My Valley" (1941).  Rural Wales was the setting of this John Ford classic film, and it featured a large cast of Welsh characters; although, it was actually filmed in Hollywood with American, Irish and Scottish actors.  Williams, who was the only genuine Welshman in the cast, originally was hired as a dialect coach for the other actors, but director John Ford gave Williams a role in the film.

Williams is recognizable to fans of the television series "Adventures of Superman," in which he played a sadistic character in one of the show's early episodes, "The Evil Three."  Other television appearances included CBS's anthology series, "The DuPont Show with June Allyson," co-starring Steve Allen in the 1960 episode "Play Acting," and five episodes of General Electric Theater between 1956 and 1961.  Williams also appeared in "The Donna Reed Show" (1958), "Temple Houston" (1963), "77 Sunset Strip" (1964), "Twelve O'Clock High" (1964-1966), "The F.B.I." (1966), "The Wild Wild West" (1966), "Mission Impossible" (1967), the "Andy Griffith Show" (1967), "Mannix" (1969), "Here Comes the Brides" (1969), among many other shows.  Williams appeared in six episodes of THE RIFLEMAN, one of six actors to portray the regular character, Doc Burrage.   He appeared in "Blood Brothers" (episode 35), "Bloodlines" (episode 42), "Letter of the Law" (episode 50), "A Case of Identity" (episode 57), "Sins of the Father" (episode 70), and "The Prodigal" (episode 71).

Dick Wilson as Doc's Patient

Dick Wilson, born Ricardo DiGuglielmo, was a British-born radio, film and television actor.  He appeared in more than 100 movies and television shows during a career spanning more than 30 years.  He began his career in radio at the age of fifteen.  Wilson anglicized his Italian name, concerned that he would be typecast for it.  After graduating from the Ontario College of Art & Design, he became a comic dancer in vaudeville.  At the outset of World War II, Wilson temporarily suspended his acting to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force, in which he served as a fighter pilot against the German Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain in 1940.  After the war ended, Wilson immigrated to America, where he become a naturalized citizen in 1954.

Despite his many film and television credits, Wilson is best-remembered for portraying Mr. Whipple, the finicky grocery store manager in the Charmin commercials, which he played for 25 years.  In honor of this role, Procter & Gamble provided Wilson with a free lifetime supply of Charmin toilet paper.  Wilson made a cameo appearance as a store manager in the fantasy comedy "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (1981), starring Lily Tomlin.

Wilson guest-starred in many popular television shows, including the crime drama "The Untouchables" (1959–1963), the road series "Route 66" (1960–1964), the medical drama "Ben Casey" (1961–1966), Rod Serling's iconic anthology series "The Twilight Zone" (1959–1964), the adventure drama "The Fugitive" (1963–1967), the family comedy "The Munsters" (1964–1966), the Sally Field comedy "The Flying Nun" (1967–1970), the Buck Henry spy spoof "Get Smart" (1965–1970), the war comedy "Hogan's Heroes" (1965–1971) and the Aaron Spelling series "Fantasy Island" (1977–1984).  He made one appearance in THE RIFLEMAN, portraying Fred in "Sins of the Father" (episode 70).  He also guest-starred in the westerns "Wagon Train" (1957–1965), starring John McIntyre and Ward Bond; "Tales of Wells Fargo" (1957–1962), starring Dale Robertson; "Bat Masterson" (1958–1961), starring Gene Barry; and "The Deputy" (1959–1961), starring Henry Fonda.


Andy Moon and his young son, Bobby, take shelter at the McCain ranch.  Andy is being hunted by the brothers of a man he killed in a gunfight.  Lucas decides to stand by Andy, believing it was a fair fight, but the situation becomes complicated when Andy's boy, Bobby, suddenly stumbles onto the truth of his father's past and the reason why they have had to keep running from town to town.

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